Two are Abramson winners

first_imgKevin Eggan, associate professor of stem cell and regenerative biology, brings undergraduates to the frontiers of life science. David Elmer, assistant professor of the classics, takes students back through some of Western culture’s most ancient and honored texts. This year, the two members of Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) have something in common: They’re both winners of a 2011 Roslyn Abramson Award for excellence in undergraduate teaching.“David Elmer and Kevin Eggan may have different areas of research, but they share a love of teaching,” said FAS Dean Michael D. Smith, the John H. Finley Jr. Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences. “Each is an outstanding scholar who also has the ability to communicate knowledge in a way that ignites in students the passion that these faculty feel for their respective fields. They embody a Harvard education at its best. I offer my congratulations to David and Kevin for an honor well-deserved.”The $9,500 award, established with a gift from Edward Abramson ’57 in honor of his mother, is given annually in recognition of “excellence and sensitivity in teaching undergraduates.” Recipients, drawn exclusively from FAS, are chosen on the basis of their ability to communicate with and inspire undergraduates, their accessibility, and their dedication to teaching.Kevin EgganEggan’s popular undergraduate course, “Human Genetics: Mining Our Genomes for an Understanding of Human Variation and Disease,” teaches students some of the fundamentals of cellular biology through the lens of the developing and aging human body. Eggan says he tries to put the principles of life science into a context that people care most about: their health.“We can learn a lot about biology from the things that go wrong with us,” Eggan says. “When there’s a congenital malformation — say, someone’s eyes are too close or too far apart — we have a chance to see what went wrong and to uncover the biology behind it. I try to show students how we use genetic thinking to solve biological problems and to identify what’s causing disease.”“Undergraduates always look at things with very fresh eyes,” Eggan said. “When they look at something for the first time, they see it in a completely different way, unencumbered by the failures of others. It makes me look at things differently too.” Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerEggan says that the most rewarding aspect of teaching is the feeling of satisfaction that comes from helping students work through a difficult concept. Because undergraduates often approach a problem or idea for the first time in his class, their untrained eyes also provide new insights.“Undergraduates always look at things with very fresh eyes,” he says. “When they look at something for the first time, they see it in a completely different way, unencumbered by the failures of others. It makes me look at things differently too.”Some of those undergraduates may share the benefit of Eggan’s award this summer, as he plans to use the prize money to support researchers in his lab.“More and more Harvard undergrads are excited about working in a lab over the summer and during the school year too,” he says. “It seems like there are always more students than money, so this will be a great way to supplement our funds.”David ElmerElmer’s challenge in teaching the classics of ancient Greece and Rome is that undergraduates are both too far from and too close to the subject matter.“It is always challenging to get students to feel a sense of connection with a distant civilization,” he explains. “At the same time, I think many students feel a deceptive familiarity with the Greeks and Romans, since our own culture is pervaded by images and symbols of the ancient world. The real task is to get students to understand both what they have in common with ancient readers and writers, and the deep strangeness of the Greeks and Romans.”Students’ encounters with the “strangeness” of Greek and Roman culture, Elmer says, also leads to teaching’s greatest reward: a “shared sense of wonder and excitement.”“I think teaching provides the best opportunity to see the power of ideas in action,” he says. “There is really nothing more rewarding for me than seeing how undergraduates take up the ideas we discuss in the classroom and make them meaningful for their own lives and experience.”Elmer realizes that few of his students will go on to be classics professors, but rankles at what he calls the “pernicious tendency” in education to define the value of knowledge exclusively by its workplace potential.“I happen to be very committed to the ideals of the traditional liberal arts education, which values the cultivation of thinking for its own sake,” he says. “I believe that the quality of our daily lives is directly related to the richness of our mental lives. Classics is particularly well suited to developing such richness, and can be a model for how to come to a deep understanding by applying a potentially unlimited set of methods and perspectives. This is a valuable skill that can readily be transferred to all areas of life.”As for the award money, Elmer says that he hopes to hire an undergraduate assistant to help with research and course development, not just to help shoulder some of the workload, but also to provide him with another opportunity to teach.“Research assistantships are, I think, another form of teaching,” he says. “Research not only guides teaching by providing the raw material for what happens in the classroom; it also helps to draw students into the pursuit of knowledge. Students really respond to the challenge and excitement of an open research question. In fact, in teaching as well as in research, I think it could be said that the presentation of a problem is often more important than the presentation of the solution. Assistantships are a great way to integrate the University’s teaching and research missions.”last_img read more

2018’s top homes revealed and Queensland reno projects are right up there among them

first_imgB & B Residence in Paddington, designed by Hogg & Lamb. Picture: Christopher Frederick Jones.A Morningside home in the same category, designed by Kieron Gait Architects took the approach of adding to the highset 1920s house by connecting it back to its garden via a pavilion. The original Queenslander was now a “retreat” containing the bedrooms and a TV and craft room while the new “garden pavilion” houses the kitchen, dining room and living areas. “Connected by a covered, but open deck and link, it encourages breezes through the site and allows the family to feel like they are within thegarden domain.” Crescent House in Seven Hills, by architecture firm Deicke Richards with Steven Clegg Design. Picture: Christopher Frederick JonesArchitect Jolyon Robinson, whose design for Avonlea saw it short-listed for the new house over 200sq m award as well as the sustainability gong, said the project was bittersweet for him as the property was on the site of his childhood home.“That house was probably the most special to me because our family home used to be on that site when we were kids,” he told The Sunday Mail. “The old Queenslander burnt down nine years ago and I was commissioned by the new owners to design them a new family home. Terrarium House in Highgate Hill by architecture firm John Ellway. Picture: Toby Scott.Also in the category was JB House in Capalaba by Reddog Architects which looked at reutilising the existing home and reconfiguring it for passive environmental control, taking a “simple approach” that revealed “points of intersection between new and old and use ordinary materials to create extraordinary spaces”.“This extension to a single storey, brick veneer home in Brisbane’s east is an example of a new wave of alterations and additions projects in the city’s suburbs,” the firm said in its statement on the project. Bungalow Garden Rooms in Paddington — Architect Myers Ellyett with Dan Young Landscape Architect. Picture: Cathy Schusler.It will face stiff competition from fellow Queenslanders, with an Auchenflower project called Bungalow Garden Rooms by Myers Ellyett with Dan Young Landscape Architectalso up for thelandscape award nationally, and three others also up for the “over 200sq m” renovation prize.A Paddington home called B & B Residence designed by Hogg & Lamb tackled turned an existing inner-city Queenslander cottage on a steep site into a reinvigorated private, functional space. “Views are edited while portions of the sky, trees and mountains are carefully framed through a series of openings, peepholes and voids,” was how Hogg & Lamb described it. Yeronga House by Tim Bennetton Architects. Picture: Shantanu Starick.Smaller renovations under 200sq m out of Queensland also caught the judges’ eyes, three of which were now in the shortlist for nationals including Terrarium House in Highgate Hill by John Ellway, where a 100-year-old cottage was jettisoned into the 21st century with a sympathetic upgrade that involved inhabiting the undercroft. ”The house began as an exercise in pragmatics,” was how the firm described the challenge. More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus19 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market19 hours agoMorningside Residence by Kieron Gait Architects. Picture: Christopher Frederick Jones.The fourth house to make the cut for its “over 200sq m” renovation work was Yeronga House by Tim Bennetton Architects in Brisbane. The low key Queenslander was transformed with a new pod or studio created to the rear of the house, separated by a walkway and series of decks going to the garden. They even raised the level of the garden to avoid the use of all balustrades. Avonlea in Eumundi gave Robinson Architects a chance to make the most of the site. Picture: Nic Granleese.“It was a labour of love. I obviously knew the site but hadn’t been there for 20 years. “The old Queenslander was beautiful but hot in summer and cold in winter. Having a blank canvas and the ability to get all the fundamentals right like orientation and windows was so great.”Of the seven Queensland renovations that made the national cut, four were for alteration and addition over 200sq m, including Seven Hills property Crescent House by Deicke Richards and Steven Clegg Design. The home was also short-listed in the garden or landscape category nationally. center_img Avonlea in Eumundi, designed by Robinson Architects. Picture: Nic Granleese.QUEENSLAND home renovations from garden rooms to pavilions and undercroft rejuvenation have made the cut in the battle for top national honours.Eleven homes in the Sunshine State were short-listed for the 2018 Houses Awards — and in a nod to the record surge in renovations, seven of the houses were upgrades.Juror Stuart Vokes, director of Vokes and Peters Queensland which won the coveted Australian House of the Year last year, was blown away by the calibre of designs coming out of Queensland.The work was so good that two homes were nominated for double awards: Avonlea by Robinson Architects in Eumundi and Crescent House in Brisbane’s Seven Hills byDeicke Richards with Steven Clegg Design. JB House in Capalaba by Reddog Architects. Picture: Christopher Frederick Jones.Monash Road House in Tarragindi by the firm Zuzana and Nicholas made it a triple out of Brisbane for the smaller renovation category, using a strategy of “minimal intervention”.The project involved “renovations to an existing post war house in Tarragindi, Queensland, through minimal interventions and new insertions within the old house” was how the firm described their work. Monash Road House in Tarragindi by architecture firm Zuzana and Nicholas. Picture: Toby Scott.Two new houses over 200sq m made the shortlist too — one out of Ashgrove called Glenlyon Estate by Push Architecture and Louise Walsh Interior Design and the other a glass pavilion wrapped in timber sliding screens titled Tinbeerwah House by Teeland Architects in the Noosa Hinterland. Glenlyon Estate in Ashgrove by Push Architecture and Louise Walsh Interior Design. Picture: Maree Homer.The idea was to open the Noosa home “to the bush, ocean, stars and sky”, with hardwood screens allowing the owners to control light, breezes, privacy and views. “The long thin plan ensures the building is only one room deep to maximise, ocean views, cross ventilation and natural light. The house layout allows the family to come together to cook, eat and relax, but also the separation of more quiet spaces for reflective time.” Tinbeerwah House in the Noosa hinterland by Teeland Architects. Picture: Jared Fowler.The 2018 Houses Award is in its eighth year and saw the highest number of entries ever, with 477 submissions, up 7 per cent on 2017.Houses magazine editor and 2018 juror, Katelin Butler, said it was “great to see our talented architects and designers experimenting and challenging the status quo, resulting in a series of surprising and delightful architectural moments.” The winners will be announced on July 27. QUEENSLAND HOMES IN 2018 HOUSES AWARD SHORTLIST: Avonlea (New House over 200m2 and Sustainability) B & B Residence (House Alteration & Addition over 200m2) Bungalow Garden Rooms (Garden or Landscape) Crescent House (Garden or Landscape and House Alteration & Addition over 200m2) Glenlyon Estate (New House over 200m2) JB House (House Alteration & Addition under 200m2) Monash Road House (House Alteration & Addition under 200m2) Morningside Residence (House Alteration & Addition over 200m2 ) Terrarium House (House Alteration & Addition under 200m2) Tinbeerwah House (New House over 200m2) Yeronga House (House Alteration & Addition over 200m2)last_img read more

Cisse apologises for elbow

first_img “I’m sorry for doing something like this,” he told club website nufc.co.uk. “I’m not the sort of player who does something like this. “It is not like me. I am not an aggressive player, but in football you cannot do something like this. “I would like to play in the next games, but I did something that is not good and the FA were right to ban me. “I would have liked to play against Burnley, to help us get a win, but I am sure the other players will do well and win the game for us. “We need points and need to win and it is not an easy match. I will not be on the pitch but my head and my heart will be with the team for the game.” Cisse will miss Thursday’s match against Burnley at St James’ Park, Saturday’s FA Cup tie at Leicester and the January 10 trip to Chelsea. Papiss Cisse has apologised for the elbow offence on Everton defender Seamus Coleman which earned the Newcastle striker a three-game ban. Cisse on Tuesday accepted a Football Association charge of violent conduct for the altercation, which occurred during the Magpies’ 3-2 Barclays Premiers League win on Sunday. The 29-year-old Senegal international, who has now played his last game for the club before heading to Equatorial Guinea for the African Nations Cup, insists the incident was totally out of character. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more