Bishop’s statement adds more confusion than clarity – Martin Ridge

first_imgAs a new generation of parents in the Diocese of Raphoe comes terms with the sexual trauma of minors highlighted in last week’s TG4 documentary, Martin Ridge, the Garda at the centre of uncovering the scandals has said Bishop McGuckian’s statement has caused more confusion than clarity.At the same time Martin Gallagher, a survivor of clerical abuse says he will accept any invitation to meet the bishop: however that meeting must include a senior Garda officer and all four participants in the TG4 ‘Finné’ documentary.Despite headlines on social media that a meeting had been arranged, Mr. Gallagher confirmed to the Tirconaill Tribune on Wednesday that he had no knowledge of this and no progress whatever been made on the issue. Gallagher said that while welcoming the Bishop’s statement he questions why it took a documentary for him to go to the gardaí and to say that any information that the Diocese of Raphoe holds in relation to the abuse of children is completely available to the gardaí.Martin Gallagher, victim of Eugene GreeneMr. Gallagher said: “We already learned from the audit of the Diocese in 2011 that not one shred of evidence was discovered, despite the human misery heaped on young boys by two leading figures in our parish.“We never had any doubt these cases were covered up and we had three bishops in forty years who did nothing to help the victims. The Church is in denial and has failed again to come to terms with the hurt of the abused and the legacy of suicide in our Diocese.”Martin Gallagher continued: “The last thing we want now is another statement from the Bishop. We need action because it is now more urgent than ever. Many of those involved are elderly and it is vital that we see the Bishop take appropriate to address the harm done. And it is his responsibility and not ours to offer a solution that will end our misery.” “I want to remind the Bishop that Fr. Greene raped me when I was a child of twelve and it continued for a whole year. But if the church had dealt with him, I would not have been abused and the same applies to many others. I can never forgive Fr. Greene for his behaviour. What he did could not have gone without notice by his superiors and it is my view that is why he was moved from parish to parish… to continue his evil deeds, it was like a virus,” he added.Tribune queryIn the aftermath of the Bishop’s response, the Tribune addressed correspondence seeking clarification on a number of issues raised on behalf of victims last Friday afternoon.The paper sought to clarify if any response is being proposed in relation to clergy referenced in the documentary and in relation to the former schoolteacher, Denis McGinely whom the programme identified as being forewarned ahead of a Garda search of his home.They raised a query in relation to the circumstances that obtained when Fr. Eugene Greene was restored to diocesan duties prior to the appointment of Bishop Philip Boyce. Martin Ridge. Photo: TG4 FinneMartin Ridge RespondsReacting to the Bishop’s statement, Martin Ridge told the Tribune: “Bishop McGuckian seems to suggest that in the ‘Finné’ documentary that there was coverup with regard to child sexual abuse in the diocese and allegations of sorts that was not already known before. “There is nothing new in the documentary that was not already highlighted in ‘Sins of Omission’ in 2002 in ‘Shame of the Catholic Church’ in 2012 and in the book, ‘Breaking the Silence’ by Martin Ridge.“What’s not clear is what the Catholic Hierarchy knew about Eugene Greene’s activity with regards to abusing children. ” Ridge said: “Clarity in writing of what the Bishops knew would be important as they can’t wash their hands off this. The real story of what happened in Raphoe to hundreds and hundreds of victims will, in my opinion, only come out when there is a full garda investigation or judicial inquiry.”Bishop’s statement adds more confusion than clarity – Martin Ridge was last modified: November 12th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Finnélast_img read more

Mobile phones bring the internet’s power to Africa’s poor

first_imgPoor people across Africa are increasingly aware of the power of the internet to improve their lives, such as find a job, and use sophisticated online tools to do just that. In under-resourced environments, mobile phones are the most efficient way for them to access these benefits. A girl takes a photo with her mobile phone during the opening ceremony for a new library in El Fasher, the capital city of North Darfur, Sudan. (Photo: Albert González Farran, UNAMID) • Mobile money is transforming Africa’s economy • Africa urged to invest in artists as visionaries • Africa and space: the continent looks skyward • Kumoodi: from Lagos to the world • Africa’s youth population can lift the continentIndra de Lanerolle, University of the WitwatersrandThere is abundant evidence that poorer people in Africa are now using the internet. In South Africa, most new users come from low income households, many of them living below the poverty line.The main driver of this trend is declining costs. Most people in Africa connect to the internet via mobile devices and the price of these is falling. Nokia, for example, launched a $29 internet phone this year.Pay-as-you-go data can be purchased in small bundles in many African countries, sometimes in increments as low as $0.10. This is true even though data prices in South Africa remain high.Solid data on how far internet use has spread is limited. The most reliable survey conducted in 11 countries in 2011 and 2012 found that about one in three South Africans, one in four Kenyans and fewer than one in 20 Ethiopians used the internet.But it appears clear that where networks are available and prices are affordable, people will use internet services.Low income users appear increasingly aware of the benefits of internet access. A study just published of South African users on low and very low incomes (most of them in households with incomes between about $45 and $450 dollars per month) found that many were aware of and used sophisticated online tools.They recognise the power of the internet for improving their lives, in looking for a job for example. Young women using their mobile phones in rural Makurdi, Benue state, Nigeria. (Photo: Kristian Buus, Stars Foundation)Different uses depending on where you areThe internet implies a single thing, a single network. But we may be coming to a point where this is no longer a useful way to describe the realities of the complex web of physical, economic, social and content networks that span the planet.For those who are well-connected, some in Africa, but most in rich countries, the internet means a wide range of services – from quickly messaging friends to storing files and photos in the cloud to accessing global databases. All are available quickly and cheaply 24/7 at home, at workplaces and educational institutions and in public spaces on a variety of devices including those with keyboards.For many of Africa’s new users, the internet means access to instant messaging (a cheaper substitute to expensive SMS text messaging) and some social media via a mobile phone. It is highly rationed and slow.Our research shows that rich media online – music and video – is consumed very lightly because of cost and slow connections. A Kenyan soldier, part of the African Union Mission to Somalia, takes a photo of himself with his mobile phone at Kismayo seaport in southern Somalia. (Photo: Tobin Jones, AU-UN IST)Broadband challenges remainThis research, and the work of others, point to the fact that for the poor, in Africa and elsewhere, the internet is a mobile-centric world.So people on low incomes are getting benefit from internet access. But the experience is a long way from the visions of broadband for all which more than 20 African countries have committed to.As one young internet user told me in a village in Kenya, you can’t write a job application on your mobile phone. And dependency on mobile networks also means that where competition is limited, data costs are too high for many people to consume data on anything but a very rationed diet.There are also concerns about the openness and security of the internet in Africa. There are significant threats of censorship. Some initiatives to make the internet more widely available are being challenged, undermining its openness. Sahal Gure Mohamed, 62, texts on his mobile while waiting to register at the Ifo refugee camp in Dadaab, Kenya, in August 2011, after fleeing from Beledhawo in Somalia. Just over 10% percent of new arrivals and some 20% of long-term residents at the camp reportedly accessed information through mobile phones. (Photo: Internews Europe)African internet progress set for reviewThe next meeting of the World Internet Project, a network of researchers from over 30 countries, is to be held in Africa for the first time. The July gathering in Johannesburg will be an opportunity to compare progress and challenges on the continent with other parts of the world.It will also provide the opportunity to engage with policy makers, researchers and the private sector on how to build on what has been achieved to enable an affordable, accessible and open internet that is truly global.Indra de Lanerolle is Visiting Researcher, Network Society Project at University of the Witwatersrand.This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.last_img read more