Klay Thompson appears unaffected with free-agency speculation, but what about Kevin Durant?

first_imgOAKLAND – As he stepped to the free throw-line, Klay Thompson heard a loud chant coming from the visiting Lakers fans in the upper deck. They did not boo him. They greeted him.“We want Thompson!!!” the Lakers fans yelled. Moments later, those same fans yelled to Kevin Durant, “We want KD!!!”The Lakers definitely want a lot of stars to join their team. Add New Orleans Pelicans forward Anthony Davis to the mix after his public trade request this week that may or may not yield a deal before the …last_img

Jamieson wins Nelson Mandela Champs

first_imgAfter his superb eight-under-par 57, Jaco van Zyl tied for eighth with five others, including fellow South African Colin Nel, on six-under-par 125. Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo material ‘A fantastic achievement’“To get your name on any European trophy is a fantastic achievement,” Jamieson said after claiming the title, “but it’s a little more special when it’s for someone like Nelson [Mandela]. The 29-year-old Scot began the last round six shots off the lead, which belonged to South Africa’s Tim Clark and Denmark’s Morten Orum Madsen on five-under-par 60. Webster and De La Riva set the bar high with rounds of 60 and 61 respectively, but Jamieson went even better, firing an eight-under-par 57 to match them on seven-under 123. Jamieson left the course after his round, returning to his hotel but, when he realised that he might be in the running, he returned. It was a good thing he did as he tied Webster and De La Rive atop the leaderboard. A birdie and victoryThe second time around, a poor drive by Webster left him in the thick rough on the left and in trouble. He did superbly to save par after missing the green with his second shot, but Jamieson was bang on with his drive and approach and two-putted for a birdie and victory. 10 December 2012 MatchedJaco van Zyl managed to match Jamieson’s heroics, but a first round of three-over-par 68 left him out of the running for the title. He had to settle for a share of fourth, one shot off the lead, with Germany’s Maximilian Kieffer, England’s Matthew Nixon and the Dane Morten Orum Madsen. “At the start of the day I probably didn’t think I would be standing here holding the trophy, but I knew I needed a fast start and I was lucky enough to get that.” Rain played havoc with the new event, co-sanctioned by the Sunshine and European Tours, leading to the cancellation of the first two rounds and some holes being reduced in length for the last two rounds, which resulted in a par-65 course. LEADERBOARD 123 Scott Jamieson (Sco) (-7) 66, 57123 Steve Webster (Eng) (-7) 63, 60123 Eduardo De La Riva (Esp) (-7) 62, 61124 Maximilian Kieffer (Ger) (-6) 62, 62124 Matthew Nixon (Eng) (-6) 63, 61124 Morten Orum Madsen (Den) (-6) 60, 64124 Tim Clark (RSA) (-6) 60, 64125 Jaco van Zyl (-5) 68, 57125 Julien Quesne (Fra) (-5) 62, 63125 Sam Little (Eng) (-5) 62, 63 125 Colin Nel (RSA) (-5) 62, 63125 Bjorn Åkesson (Swe) (-5) 63, 62125 Matthew Southgate (Eng) (-5) 62 63 Jamieson, though, wouldn’t complain. The victory was his first on the European Tour in his third season as a professional, and it came after a stirring second round. Tim Clark, who was in a four-way tie for the lead after 10 holes, saw his chances slip away at the 17th. Needing a birdie on one of the last two holes to move into the outright lead, he found a bunker and then knocked his next shot over the green on his way to a double-bogey six. It took two extra visits to the 18th hole to decide the title. De La Riva was the first man to fall by the wayside after he failed to get up and down from a greenside bunker, leaving Jamieson and Webster to play the hole again after both posted pars on the first extra hole. Scott Jamieson needed 165 shots less than par in most tournaments to capture a rain-hit Nelson Mandela Championship at the Royal Durban Golf Club after a playoff against Steve Webster and Eduardo de la Riva.last_img read more

Mobile phones bring the internet’s power to Africa’s poor

first_imgPoor people across Africa are increasingly aware of the power of the internet to improve their lives, such as find a job, and use sophisticated online tools to do just that. In under-resourced environments, mobile phones are the most efficient way for them to access these benefits. A girl takes a photo with her mobile phone during the opening ceremony for a new library in El Fasher, the capital city of North Darfur, Sudan. (Photo: Albert González Farran, UNAMID) • Mobile money is transforming Africa’s economy • Africa urged to invest in artists as visionaries • Africa and space: the continent looks skyward • Kumoodi: from Lagos to the world • Africa’s youth population can lift the continentIndra de Lanerolle, University of the WitwatersrandThere is abundant evidence that poorer people in Africa are now using the internet. In South Africa, most new users come from low income households, many of them living below the poverty line.The main driver of this trend is declining costs. Most people in Africa connect to the internet via mobile devices and the price of these is falling. Nokia, for example, launched a $29 internet phone this year.Pay-as-you-go data can be purchased in small bundles in many African countries, sometimes in increments as low as $0.10. This is true even though data prices in South Africa remain high.Solid data on how far internet use has spread is limited. The most reliable survey conducted in 11 countries in 2011 and 2012 found that about one in three South Africans, one in four Kenyans and fewer than one in 20 Ethiopians used the internet.But it appears clear that where networks are available and prices are affordable, people will use internet services.Low income users appear increasingly aware of the benefits of internet access. A study just published of South African users on low and very low incomes (most of them in households with incomes between about $45 and $450 dollars per month) found that many were aware of and used sophisticated online tools.They recognise the power of the internet for improving their lives, in looking for a job for example. Young women using their mobile phones in rural Makurdi, Benue state, Nigeria. (Photo: Kristian Buus, Stars Foundation)Different uses depending on where you areThe internet implies a single thing, a single network. But we may be coming to a point where this is no longer a useful way to describe the realities of the complex web of physical, economic, social and content networks that span the planet.For those who are well-connected, some in Africa, but most in rich countries, the internet means a wide range of services – from quickly messaging friends to storing files and photos in the cloud to accessing global databases. All are available quickly and cheaply 24/7 at home, at workplaces and educational institutions and in public spaces on a variety of devices including those with keyboards.For many of Africa’s new users, the internet means access to instant messaging (a cheaper substitute to expensive SMS text messaging) and some social media via a mobile phone. It is highly rationed and slow.Our research shows that rich media online – music and video – is consumed very lightly because of cost and slow connections. A Kenyan soldier, part of the African Union Mission to Somalia, takes a photo of himself with his mobile phone at Kismayo seaport in southern Somalia. (Photo: Tobin Jones, AU-UN IST)Broadband challenges remainThis research, and the work of others, point to the fact that for the poor, in Africa and elsewhere, the internet is a mobile-centric world.So people on low incomes are getting benefit from internet access. But the experience is a long way from the visions of broadband for all which more than 20 African countries have committed to.As one young internet user told me in a village in Kenya, you can’t write a job application on your mobile phone. And dependency on mobile networks also means that where competition is limited, data costs are too high for many people to consume data on anything but a very rationed diet.There are also concerns about the openness and security of the internet in Africa. There are significant threats of censorship. Some initiatives to make the internet more widely available are being challenged, undermining its openness. Sahal Gure Mohamed, 62, texts on his mobile while waiting to register at the Ifo refugee camp in Dadaab, Kenya, in August 2011, after fleeing from Beledhawo in Somalia. Just over 10% percent of new arrivals and some 20% of long-term residents at the camp reportedly accessed information through mobile phones. (Photo: Internews Europe)African internet progress set for reviewThe next meeting of the World Internet Project, a network of researchers from over 30 countries, is to be held in Africa for the first time. The July gathering in Johannesburg will be an opportunity to compare progress and challenges on the continent with other parts of the world.It will also provide the opportunity to engage with policy makers, researchers and the private sector on how to build on what has been achieved to enable an affordable, accessible and open internet that is truly global.Indra de Lanerolle is Visiting Researcher, Network Society Project at University of the Witwatersrand.This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.last_img read more