Béla Fleck To Debut New Trio At Dave & Tim Mexico Event

first_imgThe second annual Dave & Tim event is just a few weeks away! Set for January 12-14, 2018, the all-inclusive concert vacation features three nights of Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds performing on the beach in Riviera Maya, Mexico, just steps away from the ocean. Additional artists include critically acclaimed hit-maker Brandi Carlile, 2016 Best Folk Album GRAMMY-winning banjo extraordinaire Béla Fleck, and sister trio Joseph, each set to open one night each of the 3 the nightly concerts. Additional unique performances including daytime poolside sets will be announced in the coming weeks.Béla Fleck was originally scheduled to perform with his wife Abigail Washburn, but she is unfortunately unable to make the event. In place of their duo set, Béla will debut a new trio. As the event notes, “Béla Fleck will be premiering a new trio collaboration with the incredible Antonio Sanchez and Mathew Brewer. Abigail Washburn sends her regrets that she is unable to attend.”Drummer/composer Antonio Sánchez (Bad Hombre) is known for his Golden Globe and BAFTA-nominated score for Alejandro González Iñárritu’s Academy Award-winning film, Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance), as well as soundtracks composed for director Fernando León de Aranoa’s Política, Manual de Instrucciones, and EPIX network’s Get Shorty. His fervent solo drumming improvisations, infused with surreal electronic textures, create potent and volcanic modes of self-expression unique to him.World-renowned bassist Matt Brewer is known for his work with artists such as Greg Osby, Gonzalo Rubalcaba, Lee Konitz, David Sanchez, Terence Blanchard, Aaron Parks, Jeff “Tain” Watts, and many others. He is featured on dozens of recordings, including two on the Blue Note record label, “Channel Three” by Greg Osby, and “Avatar” by Gonzalo Rubalcaba. Matt has also led bands in New York, performing at venues such as the Jazz Gallery, Fat Cat, and the Tribeca Performing Arts Center. His band was also featured at the New Mexico International Jazz Festival. He is an adjunct faculty member at The New School, has been a guest artist/teacher at the Banff Center, and has taught lessons and masterclasses across the globe.We can’t wait to hear what this trio is made of, and are counting down the days until Dave & Tim takeover Riviera Maya!This serene Caribbean getaway, designed in partnership with CID Presents, will offer guests a fully curated experience: exclusive access to three nights of beachside performances, all-inclusive food and drink, premium hotel accommodations, shuttle service to and from Cancun International Airport and 24-hour concierge service. Guests can choose from a limited amount of remaining packages at five tropical resorts including the concert’s host resort, The Barcelo Maya.There will also be a variety of daily on-site activities, including daily sunrise and morning yoga sessions, paddleboard / kayak rentals, surfing contests and many more. Off-site adventures will include catamaran tours, zip-line & ATV tours, day trips to the Mayan ruins of Tulum and Chichen Itza, journeys to Rio Secreto (an underground all water cave) and much more.For more information or to purchase ticket/accommodation packages for Dave Matthews & Tim Reynolds’ Riviera Maya destination weekend, head to the event website.last_img read more

‘How Puerto Rico’s New Grid Could Go Wrong’

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享E&E News:The territory’s power company, the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA), is about to be privatized after 70 years as the island’s sole power provider.What worries Román is that the commonwealth’s government is approaching the massive undertaking in haste and with few safeguards in place, which it has done before, sometimes with disastrous results.That’s because the world has never seen circumstances like Puerto Rico’s.There have been bankruptcies. There has been upheaval in its regulatory regime. There have been technology transformations. There have been natural catastrophes. But there’s never been a case where all of these, plus privatization, have happened at the same time.In March, Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló made an announcement. His government would do what government often does when public infrastructure is beyond repair: cede control of PREPA and invite private dollars to rebuild it.PREPA’s monopoly would end, the generation plants would be sold off, and the transmission and distribution network would be operated on a long-term concession of up to 25 years.The Legislature took up a bill to enable it called the “Puerto Rico Electrical System Transformation Act,” which is undergoing hearings.“We are very optimistic that this process will result in us being able to transform the energy system in Puerto Rico,” said Carlos Mercader, head of the Puerto Rico Federal Affairs Administration, which represents the territorial government to Washington, D.C.Others aren’t so sure.“The bill establishes a mechanism to sell PREPA’s assets via politically driven contracts — rich in fees for lawyers, accountants, consultants and advisors,” wrote the authors of a report by the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA).The Legislature’s blueprint doesn’t address the basic problems that drove PREPA into a ditch, including political meddling, IEEFA wrote. “There’s no coherent plan toward moving toward new renewables or retiring plants to deal with declining demand,” one of the report’s authors, Cathy Kunkel, said in an interview.Others have pointed to Puerto Rico’s last privatization of a key utility as an example of what can go wrong.In the early 1990s, the island’s water agency, the Puerto Rico Aqueduct and Sewer Authority (PRASA), was in the same sort of shape PREPA is in now: saddled with debt and decrepit, unable to meet customers’ needs.Privatization of PRASA was set in motion by Gov. Pedro Rosselló, the father of the current governor. A study from the University of Iowa explains what happened. In its haste to close the deal, Puerto Rico sought few bids and wrote contracts poorly. Cost overruns ensued, along with conflicts that led to master contracts being canceled not just once, but twice.How Puerto Rico’s new grid could go wrong ‘How Puerto Rico’s New Grid Could Go Wrong’last_img read more

Hispanic ”duality” offers both challenges and opportunities

first_img continue reading » When I arrived in the United States in 1991 to study economics at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire on a Fulbright Scholarship, the first question people inevitably asked me was, “Where are you from?” I was born and raised in Panama, so the answer was easy each time I was asked. And I was asked the question a lot.For the most part, I’ve lived in the U.S. ever since that time. I married my wife—a Wisconsin native— and settled in the city of Janesville where we raised a son and a daughter. I was granted U.S. citizenship in 2014 and carry a U.S. passport. And I still get asked the question, “Where are you from?” These days, the answer isn’t quite as simple.Like many Hispanics in America, I identify strongly both with my country of origin and my adopted home. Fluent in both Spanish and English, I move comfortably in both worlds, and yet don’t feel fully a part of either one. There’s a duality to my life, an “in-between,” a situation that exists for many Hispanics. I tend to think of it as an “otherness,” with both feet planted firmly in each of two distinctly different cultures and not fully anchored to either one.Fortunately, I’ve turned what some see as an insurmountable challenge into distinct opportunities. It took a while for me as a young man to learn the norms and behaviors acceptable in my new American home. But I was an eager student and made it a point to understand and accept changes without fully losing aspects of my Panamanian culture and heritage. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more