The Mad Tea Party To Host Papadosio, TAUK, Spafford, & More

first_imgThe Mad Tea Party Jam will return to the Four Quarters Farm in Artemas, Pennsylvania this June 15-18. This year’s lineup will feature three nights of Papadosio, two nights of TAUK, three nights of BIG Something, and two nights of LITZ. Additionally, Spafford will perform two sets, along with performances from Porky’s Groove Machine and a Led Zeppelin tribute set from Electric Love Machine.This year’s theme will be “Summer of Love” in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the famed 1967 Monterey Pop Festival. All tickets are currently on sale, with more acts to be added soon. Head to the festival’s website for more information.last_img

Two are Abramson winners

first_imgKevin Eggan, associate professor of stem cell and regenerative biology, brings undergraduates to the frontiers of life science. David Elmer, assistant professor of the classics, takes students back through some of Western culture’s most ancient and honored texts. This year, the two members of Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) have something in common: They’re both winners of a 2011 Roslyn Abramson Award for excellence in undergraduate teaching.“David Elmer and Kevin Eggan may have different areas of research, but they share a love of teaching,” said FAS Dean Michael D. Smith, the John H. Finley Jr. Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences. “Each is an outstanding scholar who also has the ability to communicate knowledge in a way that ignites in students the passion that these faculty feel for their respective fields. They embody a Harvard education at its best. I offer my congratulations to David and Kevin for an honor well-deserved.”The $9,500 award, established with a gift from Edward Abramson ’57 in honor of his mother, is given annually in recognition of “excellence and sensitivity in teaching undergraduates.” Recipients, drawn exclusively from FAS, are chosen on the basis of their ability to communicate with and inspire undergraduates, their accessibility, and their dedication to teaching.Kevin EgganEggan’s popular undergraduate course, “Human Genetics: Mining Our Genomes for an Understanding of Human Variation and Disease,” teaches students some of the fundamentals of cellular biology through the lens of the developing and aging human body. Eggan says he tries to put the principles of life science into a context that people care most about: their health.“We can learn a lot about biology from the things that go wrong with us,” Eggan says. “When there’s a congenital malformation — say, someone’s eyes are too close or too far apart — we have a chance to see what went wrong and to uncover the biology behind it. I try to show students how we use genetic thinking to solve biological problems and to identify what’s causing disease.”“Undergraduates always look at things with very fresh eyes,” Eggan said. “When they look at something for the first time, they see it in a completely different way, unencumbered by the failures of others. It makes me look at things differently too.” Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerEggan says that the most rewarding aspect of teaching is the feeling of satisfaction that comes from helping students work through a difficult concept. Because undergraduates often approach a problem or idea for the first time in his class, their untrained eyes also provide new insights.“Undergraduates always look at things with very fresh eyes,” he says. “When they look at something for the first time, they see it in a completely different way, unencumbered by the failures of others. It makes me look at things differently too.”Some of those undergraduates may share the benefit of Eggan’s award this summer, as he plans to use the prize money to support researchers in his lab.“More and more Harvard undergrads are excited about working in a lab over the summer and during the school year too,” he says. “It seems like there are always more students than money, so this will be a great way to supplement our funds.”David ElmerElmer’s challenge in teaching the classics of ancient Greece and Rome is that undergraduates are both too far from and too close to the subject matter.“It is always challenging to get students to feel a sense of connection with a distant civilization,” he explains. “At the same time, I think many students feel a deceptive familiarity with the Greeks and Romans, since our own culture is pervaded by images and symbols of the ancient world. The real task is to get students to understand both what they have in common with ancient readers and writers, and the deep strangeness of the Greeks and Romans.”Students’ encounters with the “strangeness” of Greek and Roman culture, Elmer says, also leads to teaching’s greatest reward: a “shared sense of wonder and excitement.”“I think teaching provides the best opportunity to see the power of ideas in action,” he says. “There is really nothing more rewarding for me than seeing how undergraduates take up the ideas we discuss in the classroom and make them meaningful for their own lives and experience.”Elmer realizes that few of his students will go on to be classics professors, but rankles at what he calls the “pernicious tendency” in education to define the value of knowledge exclusively by its workplace potential.“I happen to be very committed to the ideals of the traditional liberal arts education, which values the cultivation of thinking for its own sake,” he says. “I believe that the quality of our daily lives is directly related to the richness of our mental lives. Classics is particularly well suited to developing such richness, and can be a model for how to come to a deep understanding by applying a potentially unlimited set of methods and perspectives. This is a valuable skill that can readily be transferred to all areas of life.”As for the award money, Elmer says that he hopes to hire an undergraduate assistant to help with research and course development, not just to help shoulder some of the workload, but also to provide him with another opportunity to teach.“Research assistantships are, I think, another form of teaching,” he says. “Research not only guides teaching by providing the raw material for what happens in the classroom; it also helps to draw students into the pursuit of knowledge. Students really respond to the challenge and excitement of an open research question. In fact, in teaching as well as in research, I think it could be said that the presentation of a problem is often more important than the presentation of the solution. Assistantships are a great way to integrate the University’s teaching and research missions.”last_img read more

Martin Odegaard intends to see out Real Sociedad loan spell amid transfer interest form Man Utd & Arsenal

first_imgAdvertisement Coral BarryThursday 3 Oct 2019 12:41 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link470Shares Odegaard is on a two-year loan spell at Real Sociedad (Picture: AP)‘I have had two seasons in a row where I’ve changed teams. To have some stability is good [and] this is a great club and hopefully we can get European football for next season.’AdvertisementAdvertisementLiverpool and Arsenal are also reported suitors of Odegaard, while Real Madrid are considering recalling the playmaker from his loan deal after a string of impressive performances.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityOdegaard joined Real Madrid in 2015 as a teenager, but the loan spell at Real Sociedad is his third as a Real player.‘Of course I want to play there but I’m still young so I’m happy here at the moment,’ Odegaard said about his future. Advertisement Odegaard is being tracked by United, Arsenal and Liverpool (Picture: Getty)Martin Odegaard tried to dampen transfer speculation linking him with a move to the Premier League by insisting he intends to stay at Real Sociedad for the entirety of his loan deal.Real Madrid shipped the young Norwegian to their La Liga rivals on a two-year loan deal and Odegaard has got off to a flying start with two goals and two assists in seven La Liga appearances.Manchester United are the latest side to be credited with an interest in Odegaard and the 20-year-old has now spoken out on his future.‘My intention is to stay [at Sociedad] two years and I think that’s important for me, too,’ said Odegaard.ADVERTISEMENTcenter_img Odegaard played down speculation about his future (Picture: Getty)‘I am here two years and after that we will see… Madrid will always sign good players, that’s important for the club, they want to be the best club in the world and that’s normal.‘I’m dreaming to be the best I can be. You never know what happens in football but my dream, and what I’m hoping for is to play for Madrid.’MORE: Unai Emery reveals where he wants to play Arsenal forward Gabriel MartinelliMore: FootballBruno Fernandes responds to Man Utd bust-up rumours with Ole Gunnar SolskjaerNew Manchester United signing Facundo Pellistri responds to Edinson Cavani praiseArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira moves Martin Odegaard intends to see out Real Sociedad loan spell amid transfer interest form Man Utd & Arsenal Commentlast_img read more

High school volleyball roundup

first_img Fitness trainer is now cancer-exercise expert – October 12, 2014 Ellsworth got off to a strong start, besting Bucksport 25-15 in the first game of the match.The Golden Bucks rebounded to win the next two games, 25-18 and 25-17, before Ellsworth got the equalizer with a lopsided 25-8 fourth game win.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textBut the Bucks rallied in the decisive final contest to eke out a 17-15 win.For Bucksport, Holly Judkins led the team with six aces and four digs. Joy Fitzgerald had five aces and two digs, Chloe Stubbs had two aces and eight digs and Whitney Gaudet had three aces and two digs.Sarah Shelton led Ellsworth with 17 kills, four aces and two digs. Delaney Sargent had nine aces, three kills and three digs; Sammy Mason had five kills and three digs; Rachel Bunker had six kills and five aces; Alexa Grant had six aces; and Liz Perry had five aces.With wins this week over Bucksport, Washington Academy and Calais the 7-0 Mount Desert Island Trojans maintained their tenuous hold on the top spot in the state Class A standings.The Trojans lead 6-0 Greely by just one point.The 4-4 Ellsworth Eagles currently are ranked fourth in the Class A standings, and in Class B, the 2-3 Sumner Tigers are sixth.In earlier action:Washington Academy 3, Ellsworth 1The Raiders of Washington Academy rallied from a first game loss to win the next three in a 3-1 victory over the Eagles on Wednesday, Sept. 17, in Ellsworth.Ellsworth took the first game 25-14, but the Raiders went on to post game scores of 26-24, 25-20 and 25-23.For the Eagles, Sarah Shelton had eight aces and 15 kills, Maddie Dow had two assists and four blocks and Alexa Grant had five assists.Calais 3, Sumner 2The Tigers won the first two games only to see the Calais Blue Devils rally for a 3-2 win on Wednesday, Sept. 17, in Calais.For the Tigers, Amie O’Hara had three aces and two digs; Kiandra Barnes had three aces and a dig; Tianah Johnson had one aces, seven digs and three tips; Julia Tardy had two aces, 10 digs and a kill; and Emily Martin had three aces, two digs, a kill and two tips.MDI 3, Bucksport 0The Trojans continued their winning ways on Wednesday, Sept. 18, downing the Bucksport Golden Bucks by lopsided game scores of  25-9, 25-13 and 25-6.MDI 3, Washington Academy 1Sarah Phelps led the way as the Trojans remained undefeated with a 3-1 win over the Washington Academy Raiders on Friday.Phelps had 12 aces, 6 kills, one assist and six digs. Camilla Thomassen-Tai had three aces, a kill and six digs; Riley Mooers had four aces, a kill and 18 assists; and Kayla Ray had five aces, four kills and a dig.Sumner 3, Narraguagus 1The Tigers notched their second win, downing the Narraguagus Knights 3-1 on Friday in Sullivan by game scores of 25-20, 16-25, 25-18 and 25-22.For Sumner, O’Hara had three aces, three digs and two blocks; Tardy had seven aces, two kills and 12 digs; Barnes had five aces, two kills and a dig; Johnson had six aces, nine digs and three tips; and Martin had four aces, eight digs and three tips.Bucksport 3, Calais 1The Golden Bucks dropped the first game 15-25, then reeled of wins of 25-20, 25-14 and 25-20 over the Calais Blue Devils on Friday in Calais.For Bucksport, Holly Judkins had three aces, 11 digs, an assist and a kill; Joy Fitzgerald had five aces and two kills; Natalie Gray had four kills and an assist; Chloe Stubbs had five aces, two digs and a kill; and Whitney Gaudet had three aces, five assists and two digs.MDI 3, Calais 0The Trojans claimed their seventh win, downing the Calais Blue Devils by game scores of 25-10, 25-13 and 25-14 on Saturday in Calais.For the Trojans, Phelps had nine aces, four kills and a dig; Elise Robertson had four kills; Ray had 13 aces and two kills; and Mooers had five aces, a kill and 11 assists. Latest Posts Latest posts by Fenceviewer Staff (see all) Fenceviewer Staff Bio Schoodic Grange hosting sale – October 30, 2014 Senior Kayla Ray, right, of the Mount Desert Island High School varsity volleyball team sets up a shot Friday in a match with Washington Academy. Teammate Camilla Thomassen-Tai stands by.ELLSWORTH — The Bucksport Golden Bucks moved into second place in the state Class B volleyball standings on Tuesday with a close 3-2 win over the Class A Ellsworth Eagles. Town report wins award – October 11, 2014last_img read more

Former European Indoor Champion Dies from COVID-19

first_imgDonato-Sabia Italy’s 1984 European indoor 800m champion Donato Sabia has tragically died from coronavirus (Covid-19) at the age of 56 in the southern Italian town of Potenza, the Italian athletics federation (FIDAL) announced late on Wednesday.He is thought to be the first European athletics champion to have succumbed to the virus which has currently claimed nearly 57,000 lives across Europe, including over 17,000 in Italy.Sabia made his major international debut at the 1982 European Athletics Indoor Championships but didn’t progress from his heat. The following year he competed in the inaugural World Athletics Championships and while he again didn’t qualify from his 800m heat he was part of an Italian 4x400m quartet that finished fifth. He won the 1984 European indoor 800m title in Gothenburg with a brave run which saw him take the lead over the first half of the race before finding the front again with 100 metres to go and crossing the line in 1:48.05.Later in 1984, he set a world best over 500m before making the 1984 Olympic Games 800m and 4x400m finals, finishing fifth in both races.After several years of injury problems, he returned to top form and also made the 1988 Olympic 800 final, where he finished seventh.His personal best of 1:43.88 in Florence on 13 June 1984 remains the Italian U-23 record and he is still third on the Italian all-time list over two laps of the track.Sabia remained involved in athletics after his competitive retirement at the end of 1990 and was the president of the FIDAL regional committee in Basilicata.European Athletics wishes to pass on its deepest sympathy to his family and to FIDAL at this difficult time, his death coming just a few days after that of his father from the virus.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

IHOC : Orange defense stifles Connecticut attack in weekend sweep

first_img Comments After Syracuse was called for a two-minute bench minor for having too many players on the ice at 14:04 in the second period Friday, Connecticut desperately tried to break out on the power play to cut into the Orange’s two-goal lead.But Connecticut couldn’t even manage a shot and failed to capitalize on the power-play opportunity after SU freshman forward Shiann Darkangelo lay out at the top of the zone to block a shot just seconds before SU returned to full strength.‘We had a couple penalty kills, and it seemed like we blocked 10 shots out there,’ senior Jessica Sorensen said Saturday. ‘It definitely just got the spirit up on the bench, and we kept it going.’SU’s defense and penalty kill unit led the Orange (5-6-0, 0-0 College Hockey America) to a weekend sweep of Connecticut (1-7-2, 1-1-0 Hockey East), winning 4-0 Friday in front of 164 and 2-1 Saturday in front of 263 at Tennity Ice Pavilion. The Orange smothered the Huskies’ nine power-play opportunities on the weekend and set up the offensive attack to spark SU to both victories.The Syracuse defense frustrated Connecticut from the drop of the puck on Friday, relying on physicality to secure its first shutout of the season. The Huskies’ frustration was also the result of an improved effort from the Orange penalty kill, which was tested often throughout the weekend.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSU frequently found itself with a player in the box in both games and blocked multiple shots to end UConn’s scoring threats. Syracuse spent 18 minutes with a one- or two-player disadvantage due to its nine penalties.The Orange’s success blocking shots started at practice on Monday, when the defense practiced blocking shots on the penalty kill by shooting rolls of masking tape at each other, a drill designed for players to tame their fear of getting hit by the puck. Just four days later, the defense implemented the technique to perfection against Connecticut.‘Of course it’s fun in practice when you’re shooting tape at each other,’ freshman forward Allie LaCombe said. ‘But the concept is actually smart because you have to train yourself not to be afraid of the puck.’The SU defenders played composed during penalty kills and kept everything in front of them by maintaining good positioning. And as they had practiced with rolls of tape days earlier, the defenders frustrated Connecticut’s ‘BU-style’ power play, which isolates a player on the weakside for a one-time slap shot. They interfered with shooting lanes, which forced the Huskies’ forwards to shoot the puck wide of the net.That aggressive blocking technique was on display when Darkangelo and the SU defense stifled the UConn power play on Friday.On Saturday, Syracuse fended off another important Connecticut power-play opportunity when the Orange had two players sent to the box early in the second period. The defense pulled out all the stops on the two-player disadvantage and kept the Huskies’ lead to one goal. ‘You seize the momentum by killing that five-on-three, and we did a great job,’ head coach Paul Flanagan said. ‘That’s a lot of hard work and great goaltending.’Flanagan and his players credited the tremendous defensive play to their much improved penalty kill effort. The Orange was clicking defensively, which led to quality shots and possessions on the offensive end. The SU defensive effort was backed by solid play between the pipes. The Orange’s two-goalie system, with sophomores Kallie Billadeau and Jenesica Drinkwater, kept the Huskies’ forwards in check and made 17 saves and 22 saves, respectively. They also sparked the offense with outlet passes that Flanagan called ‘textbook cycling.’But the Syracuse defenders’ biggest contribution came on the penalty kill. They blocked plenty of shots when they needed to and helped the Orange overcome its mistakes to beat the Huskies.‘We made mistakes, but we recovered well, and that’s a good sign,’ Flanagan said. ‘We had a great attitude for 60 minutes.’[email protected] Published on October 30, 2011 at 12:00 pmcenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more