OPD seeks assistance in shooting investigation

first_img Local NewsCrime OPD seeks assistance in shooting investigation By admin – March 27, 2018 Odessa police are seeking information from the public after a shooting Monday night at 14th Street and Grant Avenue.An Odessa police release stated that several witnesses observed suspects in a silver Toyota 4-Runner fire a shot into another vehicle at around 7 p.m.There were no reports of injuries but officers observed a bullet hole in the complainant’s vehicle.According to the two complainants, they were behind the Toyota at a stoplight when the light turned green. The Toyota didn’t move, then after the complainants honked their horn, the Toyota started playing with its brakes in front of them. When the victims pulled around to pass, the Toyota sped up and a passenger in it fired one round at the victims’ vehicle.Odessa police encourages anyone with information to contact the department. Police searching for woman connected to husband’s death WhatsApp Pinterest Previous articleFive things you need to know today, March 27Next articleMan arrested on family violence charges involving wife, child admin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Youngsters urged to be safe over graduation weekends Fruit Salad to Die ForSummer Spaghetti SaladSmoked Bacon Wrapped French Vidalia OnionPowered By 10 Sec Mama’s Deviled Eggs NextStay Pinterest Twitter Facebook WhatsApp Police searching for man connected to hit and run Facebook Home Local News Crime OPD seeks assistance in shooting investigation Twitterlast_img read more

Two are Abramson winners

first_imgKevin Eggan, associate professor of stem cell and regenerative biology, brings undergraduates to the frontiers of life science. David Elmer, assistant professor of the classics, takes students back through some of Western culture’s most ancient and honored texts. This year, the two members of Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) have something in common: They’re both winners of a 2011 Roslyn Abramson Award for excellence in undergraduate teaching.“David Elmer and Kevin Eggan may have different areas of research, but they share a love of teaching,” said FAS Dean Michael D. Smith, the John H. Finley Jr. Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences. “Each is an outstanding scholar who also has the ability to communicate knowledge in a way that ignites in students the passion that these faculty feel for their respective fields. They embody a Harvard education at its best. I offer my congratulations to David and Kevin for an honor well-deserved.”The $9,500 award, established with a gift from Edward Abramson ’57 in honor of his mother, is given annually in recognition of “excellence and sensitivity in teaching undergraduates.” Recipients, drawn exclusively from FAS, are chosen on the basis of their ability to communicate with and inspire undergraduates, their accessibility, and their dedication to teaching.Kevin EgganEggan’s popular undergraduate course, “Human Genetics: Mining Our Genomes for an Understanding of Human Variation and Disease,” teaches students some of the fundamentals of cellular biology through the lens of the developing and aging human body. Eggan says he tries to put the principles of life science into a context that people care most about: their health.“We can learn a lot about biology from the things that go wrong with us,” Eggan says. “When there’s a congenital malformation — say, someone’s eyes are too close or too far apart — we have a chance to see what went wrong and to uncover the biology behind it. I try to show students how we use genetic thinking to solve biological problems and to identify what’s causing disease.”“Undergraduates always look at things with very fresh eyes,” Eggan said. “When they look at something for the first time, they see it in a completely different way, unencumbered by the failures of others. It makes me look at things differently too.” Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerEggan says that the most rewarding aspect of teaching is the feeling of satisfaction that comes from helping students work through a difficult concept. Because undergraduates often approach a problem or idea for the first time in his class, their untrained eyes also provide new insights.“Undergraduates always look at things with very fresh eyes,” he says. “When they look at something for the first time, they see it in a completely different way, unencumbered by the failures of others. It makes me look at things differently too.”Some of those undergraduates may share the benefit of Eggan’s award this summer, as he plans to use the prize money to support researchers in his lab.“More and more Harvard undergrads are excited about working in a lab over the summer and during the school year too,” he says. “It seems like there are always more students than money, so this will be a great way to supplement our funds.”David ElmerElmer’s challenge in teaching the classics of ancient Greece and Rome is that undergraduates are both too far from and too close to the subject matter.“It is always challenging to get students to feel a sense of connection with a distant civilization,” he explains. “At the same time, I think many students feel a deceptive familiarity with the Greeks and Romans, since our own culture is pervaded by images and symbols of the ancient world. The real task is to get students to understand both what they have in common with ancient readers and writers, and the deep strangeness of the Greeks and Romans.”Students’ encounters with the “strangeness” of Greek and Roman culture, Elmer says, also leads to teaching’s greatest reward: a “shared sense of wonder and excitement.”“I think teaching provides the best opportunity to see the power of ideas in action,” he says. “There is really nothing more rewarding for me than seeing how undergraduates take up the ideas we discuss in the classroom and make them meaningful for their own lives and experience.”Elmer realizes that few of his students will go on to be classics professors, but rankles at what he calls the “pernicious tendency” in education to define the value of knowledge exclusively by its workplace potential.“I happen to be very committed to the ideals of the traditional liberal arts education, which values the cultivation of thinking for its own sake,” he says. “I believe that the quality of our daily lives is directly related to the richness of our mental lives. Classics is particularly well suited to developing such richness, and can be a model for how to come to a deep understanding by applying a potentially unlimited set of methods and perspectives. This is a valuable skill that can readily be transferred to all areas of life.”As for the award money, Elmer says that he hopes to hire an undergraduate assistant to help with research and course development, not just to help shoulder some of the workload, but also to provide him with another opportunity to teach.“Research assistantships are, I think, another form of teaching,” he says. “Research not only guides teaching by providing the raw material for what happens in the classroom; it also helps to draw students into the pursuit of knowledge. Students really respond to the challenge and excitement of an open research question. In fact, in teaching as well as in research, I think it could be said that the presentation of a problem is often more important than the presentation of the solution. Assistantships are a great way to integrate the University’s teaching and research missions.”last_img read more

Thauvin ready for tough start

first_img “It’s always been my dream to be a footballer in the Premier League, and I’m happy to be here and do that. “The Premier League is well known for being a very physical league. It’s a bit different to France. It’s not something that concerns me, although maybe I’ll have to take a bit of time to get used to it. Once I do, I’ll be fine.” Steve McClaren’s men head for Old Trafford having allowed the positives from an encouraging opening-day display against Southampton to dissipate with a poor performance in defeat at Swansea last weekend, and the head coach will be looking for a significant response. Thauvin has been at his new club for just a matter of days, but he insists he is ready to play. He said: “Of course, it’s a magnificent stadium, a magnificent ground and they are a massive team too in the Premier League, so it’s always an honour and a pleasure to be able to play in such places. “I did pre-season at Marseille, played in all the friendly games – I even started the season out there, so if the coach needs me, I am there.” Newcastle had chased France Under-21 Thauvin for more than two years, although he revealed there was a time when he might have ended up at Arsenal instead. He said: “Two or three seasons ago, Arsene Wenger perhaps made an approach with Arsenal, but apart from Arsenal, Newcastle are the only other club who have made an approach for me in the past.” Newcastle’s new signing Florian Thauvin has shrugged off his £13million price-tag as he prepares for the challenge of proving himself in the Barclays Premier League. The 22-year-old winger, who completed his move from Marseille to Tyneside on Wednesday, could be thrown in at the deep end at Manchester United on Saturday, but is relishing the task of justifying the Magpies’ investment in him. Thauvin said: “It’s not a problem for me to have such a high price-tag. I’m a footballer, and that’s my passion and my job. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

Despite loss, goalkeeper Bono gives Syracuse a force in net against Georgetown’s aggressive offense

first_imgWASHINGTON, D.C. — Alex Bono leaned over to fix the socks that had rolled up after another sliding save. But the freshman goalkeeper noticed that Georgetown had regained possession and was on the attack again, and that meant he would have to wait to brush the dirt off his shin guards.Bono was too preoccupied with the vaunted Georgetown attack to fix his socks or try to relax during Syracuse’s third-round NCAA tournament game. But even in a losing effort, he saved his best performance for his last game, saving eight shots and playing like the program centerpiece that head coach Ian McIntyre hoped he’d become.“Alex kept us in it tonight,” McIntyre said after the game. “He was brilliant tonight, and without him on our side it would’ve been tough to keep it that close.”McIntyre was right. The game had every making of a one-sided affair, with the third-seeded Hoyas holding the ball away from Syracuse and driving on goal again and again.Georgetown took 16 shots in the first 90 minutes. It shot five more times over the two following 10-minute overtime periods. And after that, Georgetown tested Bono four more times during the penalty-kick stage.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textBono didn’t save any of Georgetown’s four penalty kicks. He did, however, disrupt enough Hoya scoring opportunities to ensure that his team would even reach that stage.The Baldwinsville native started his strong performance early on. Thirteen minutes into the first half, a Georgetown corner kick taken by Steve Neumann curved from left to right and headed right to a pack of waiting Hoya players.But Bono ended that threat quickly. He boxed out two attacking players, leapt over another and snatched the ball at its highest point before landing squarely on his two feet.“Not a lot of other goalkeepers can do something like that,” said defender Nick Bibbs, who patted Bono on the back after he punted the ball away. “Sometimes you wonder how he can get so tall.”Bono would take charge of the SU defense again minutes later. On a free kick granted to Georgetown, he directed a wall of defenders to shield the goal from a striking Andy Reimer. The ball deflected off Bibbs and rolled back to Reimer, who played it back into the box and into another swarm of Hoya attackers.This time, Bono punched the ball away with two clenched fists, redirecting the kick out to midfielder Nick Perea and jumpstarting the SU counterattack.But no other save was more impressive than the one Bono notched with 10 minutes left. Brandon Allen gained position at the top of Syracuse’s 18-yard box, split two defenders, and launched a shot to the near post.Bono prevented a surefire goal when he dove right, jamming one arm against the post in order to block the shot with the other.He relinquished his first goal five minutes later. But after Jordan Murrell watched Bono deny one of the NCAA’s top teams over and over again, he couldn’t help but think about the future of his program — one that features an even better Bono than the one on display during Syracuse’s season finale.“It’s tough to lose, but this season opened up so many possibilities for us,” Murrell said. “It starts with the goalkeeper, and it just trickles down. It’s tough not to smile when you think about what he can eventually be for us.” Comments Published on November 25, 2012 at 11:36 pm Contact Nick: [email protected] | @nicktoneytweets Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Clayton Kershaw as the National League MVP — the numbers don’t lie

first_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Here is the case to be made for Kershaw and how he ranks among his National League peers. Stats below are limited to the 44 qualifying National League pitchers who have averaged at least one inning pitched for every game his team has played.WINS19 – Kershaw18 – Johnny Cueto (Cincinnati)/Adam Wainwright (St. Louis)11.27 – National League average Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw looks to be a shoo-in for his third National League Cy Young Award. However, unlike last season when the southpaw won the Cy Young Award and placed sixth in the NL Most Valuable Player Award voting, the 26-year-old appears to be a serious NL MVP candidate.In 19 starts since June 2, Kershaw has gone 16-1 with a miniscule 1.26 earned-run average. According to the Elias Sports Bureau, since 1913 — the first year earned runs were tracked in both major leagues — the only pitcher with a stretch of 19 starts within one season in which he recorded at least 16 wins with no more than one loss with an ERA as low as Kershaw’s is the St. Louis legend Bob Gibson,The Cardinals right-hander went 17-1 with a 0.72 ERA over a 19-start span from June 2 through Sept. 2, 1968.Which is fitting considering the last pitcher to win an NL MVP was Gibson in 1968, when he finished 22-9 with a 1.12 ERA.center_img WIN-LOSS PCT..863 – Kershaw (19-3).706 – Jordan Zimmermann (Washington, 12-5).527 – National League averageERA (Earned-Run Average)1.70 – Kershaw2.15 – Johnny Cueto (Cincinnati)3.53 – National League averageWHIP (Walks plus Hits divided by Innings Pitched)0.83 – Kershaw0.96 – Johnny Cueto (Cincinnati)1.24 – National League averageCOMPLETE GAMES6 – Kershaw4 – 4 players tied0.98 – National League averageSTRIKEOUT-TO-WALK RATIO7.82 – Kershaw6.00 – Jordan Zimmermann (Washington)3.16 – National League averageSTRIKEOUTS PER NINE INNINGS10.63 – Kershaw10.25 – Stephen Strasburg (Washington)7.40 – National League averageAnd for the more advanced pitching statistics, we offer Kershaw and his top competition in the National League:FIP (Fielding Independent Pitching)(Measures pitcher’s effectiveness at preventing HR, BB, HBP and causing strikeouts)1.86 – Kershaw2.61 – Hyun-Jin Ryu (Dodgers)2.77 – Jordan Zimmermann (Washington)ERA+(adjusted to the player’s ballpark)210 – Kershaw168 – Johnny Cueto (Cincinnati)147 – Cole Hamels (Philadelphia)WAR (Wins Above Replacement)(Number of wins the player added to the team above what a replacement player would add)8.0 – Kershaw6.5 – Jason Heyward (Atlanta)6.4 – Johnny Cueto (Cincinnati)WPA (Win Probability Added)(Given average teams, this is the change in probability; a change of +/- 1 would indicate one win added or lost)5.2 – Kershaw4.3 – Johnny Cueto (Cincinnati)3.7 – Adam Wainwright (St. Louis)SITUATIONAL WINS SAVED(Sum of WPA divided by the leverage index for each play)5.3 – Kershaw3.9 – Adam Wainwright (St. Louis)3.9 – Johnny Cueto (Cincinnati)last_img read more