Milford woman fined after dog attacks neighbour

first_imgA Judge has said dog owners look very differently at their pets than people who do not own dogs.Judge Paul Kelly was speaking in the case of a young Co Donegal woman charged with not having her dog under control or having a muzzle or chain on it.Shauna Galagher appeared at Falcarragh District Court after her German Shepherd dog attacked her neighbour. The court heard Ms Gallagher, 23, had her dog at her home at Moyle Park on September 1st last year.The dog, whom she had owned since it was a pup, became excited when it came across neighbour Sarah McGoldrick.It jumped up on her and bit her on the forearm leaving her with two puncture wounds.The young mum had to receive medical treatment from her local doctor for the wounds. Solicitor for Ms Galagher, Mr Rory O’Brien told the court that the dog was licensed but that he was not muzzled or on a lead when he came out of the rear of the house.He said it was a “human error” and the dog was normally under control and well behaved.Since the incident, Ms Gallagher’s partner had put up a fence and bolts to keep the dog enclosed.“It was a once-off isolated incident,” added Mr O’Brien.However, Judge Kelly said people who owned dogs took a different view from people who didn’t own them. Judge Kelly described it as a “terrifying ordeal” for the injured party to be attacked by a dog and particularly a German Shepherd.There was an obligation on such dog owners to have the animal on a leash and muzzled.“That’s why the laws are in place.” saying the victim of the attack had received a “nasty injury” as a result.He ordered Ms Gallagher to pay Ms McGoldrick €250 for her costs including medical treatment. Milford woman fined after dog attacks neighbour was last modified: November 25th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Chicken, Silkworm Genomes Published

first_imgNow that the chicken genome has made the cover of Nature1 and the silkworm genome has been published in Science2 this week, evolutionists are busily mining the data for clues to evolutionary ancestry of very disparate groups of animals, says EurekAlert (also here and here).  For example, in the paper on the silkworm genome, the authors say, “Lepidoptera are unusual because they have holocentric chromosomes with diffuse kinetochores.  This characteristic is a potential driver of evolution because of the ability to retain chromosome fragments through many cell divisions.”  Yet in this case evolution is assumed; what was observed was an example of something that provides functional integrity. 1Jeremy Schmutz and Jane Grimwood, “Genomes: A fowl sequence,” Nature 432, 679 – 680 (09 December 2004); doi:10.1038/432679a.2Biology Analysis Group, “A Draft Sequence for the Genome of the Domesticated Silkworm (Bombyx mori), Science, Vol 306, Issue 5703, 1937-1940, 10 December 2004, [DOI: 10.1126/science.1102210].Most of the evolutionary claims merely assume evolution, or make empty promises about how the new genomes will help shed light on evolution.  Example: “As life on Earth evolved over time, genes have been created, kept, discarded or deactivated, and reorganized.  At the particular point in evolutionary time over which a species first develops, these processes may have changed a gene in ways that allow scientists to use it to get a better fix on the human version of the gene.”    OK, design scientists, get busy.  Don’t just sit around telling jokes about why the chicken crossed the road.  The Darwin Party is already busily invoking their favorite word games like convergence and homoplasy, and tweaking the rate of evolution for this or that chrome to make things fit their preconceived beliefs.  There’s a wealth of complexity and order to mine in these new genetic data.  Don’t let evolutionary storytelling win by default. (Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Martinez ‘surprised’ with Olympics showing after just 3 weeks of training

first_imgJohn Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics PLAY LIST 00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics01:44US transit worker saves man who fell on rail track00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH Joint Koreas hockey team ends historic Olympic run Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC MOST READ LATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Read Next 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena stingcenter_img NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencers Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises Martinez, 21, wasn’t even supposed to make it to the Games after finishing eighth in the 2017 CS Nebelhorn Trophy, which served as an Olympic qualification last September.READ: Martinez finishes 28th, fails to advance to Olympics free stake roundFEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutBut after the pullout of Swedish figure skater Alexander Majorov, he was given the last quota spot and earned his ticket to PyeongChang.Despite the short notice, Martinez still pulled off a clean performance, scoring 55.56 in his short program performance, which was only good for 28th place among 30 competitors. Michael Christian Martinez of the Philippines reacts as his score is posted following his performance in the men’s short program figure skating in the Gangneung Ice Arena at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Gangneung, South Korea, Friday, Feb. 16, 2018. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)Though he failed to improve his standing in the 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympics, Michael Christian Martinez is proud with his showing in the men’s figure skating given the circumstances he had to deal with.“With three weeks to prepare for PyeongChang and to be able to perform what I just did, that was just unbelievable,” he told INQUIRER.net in an online interview.ADVERTISEMENT Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH It may not have been enough to advance to the free skate round, where Japan’s Yuzuru Hanyu claimed the gold medal, but Martinez was satisfied with what he was able to showcase.“A lot of people knew about it and very surprised that the fact I am back on doing my triple jumps again and be able to skate a clean program is truly something else,” he shared. “Usually it takes two to three months to get the jumps the way it was before, and need at least another two months of training to be able to prepare for a competition, but I only did it in three weeks.”With another Olympic experience under his belt, Martinez hopes that his showing would serve as an inspiration for the young figure skaters as he seeks to continue hoisting the Philippine flag in the Winter Games.“I really worked so hard for me to be able to do what I needed to do out there. I really am proud that I get to represent our country at the 2018 Winter Olympic Games. To be part of this Olympic Journey is truly amazing,” he said.ADVERTISEMENT View comments AFP official booed out of forumlast_img read more

10 months agoMolde chief Neerland: We couldn’t block Solskjaer moving to Man Utd

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Molde chief Neerland: We couldn’t block Solskjaer moving to Man Utdby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveMolde management admit they were blindsided by Manchester United’s move for Ole Gunnar Solskjaer.Solskjaer, who signed a new deal as manager of Norwegian club Molde earlier this month, was appointed interim boss until the end of the season on Wednesday.Molde managing director Oystein Neerland said they were called by United executive vice-chairman Ed Woodward on Tuesday and both he and Solskjaer “didn’t see it coming.””I think it is double sided,” Neerland told BBC Sport.”On one hand, Molde lose their manager for the next months who had just agreed a new three-year contract. On the other hand, Molde will not get in the way of such an opportunity.”When the biggest club in the world call and ask to borrow your manager from a club the size of Molde, you have to say yes.”Solskjaer has been dreaming about this. It is no longer a dream.” last_img read more

a month agoSevilla sporting director Monchi admits Real Madrid deserved win

first_imgAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Sevilla sporting director Monchi admits Real Madrid deserved winby Carlos Volcanoa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveSevilla sporting director Monchi admits Real Madrid deserved their 1-0 win at the Estadio Ramon Sanchez Pizjuan on Sunday.Karim Benzema’s second half header made sure that Zinedine Zidane’s side responded in the right way after their 3-0 defeat in Paris on Wednesday.”Today we saw a good Real Madrid team,” Monchi said.”They were a team that performed at a very high level, nothing like the level of Wednesday.”They were a team made to win and at this level it’s not easy.” last_img

Video: Bret Bielema May Have Also Bumped Into Kenyan Drake On Purpose

first_imgbret bielema kenyan drakebret bielema kenyan drakeEarlier Monday morning, we showed you a video of Arkansas head coach Bret Bielema pulling what can only be described as a questionable move on Alabama offensive lineman Cam Robinson. It turns out it may not have been the only time the Razorbacks coach got physical with a member of the Crimson Tide.In the below video, also taken from Saturday’s contest, Bielema appears to bump Alabama running back Kenyan Drake out of bounds near the end of a play – again. Judge for yourself.Was it intentional? Regardless, it’s about to be the second viral video involving Bielema’s conduct during Saturday’s game.last_img

Lets Overreact To FirstRound NBA Playoff Games

Embed Code More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed FiveThirtyEight This week on Hot Takedown, we’re reacting to a series of upsets in the first round of the NBA playoffs. The Los Angeles Clippers pulled off the biggest comeback in playoff history, but we don’t necessarily think the Warriors should be too worried for the rest of the series. Other upsets included the No. 7 seed Orlando Magic defeating the No. 2 Toronto Raptors; that Game 1 victory had Mike Tuck on “Open Mike” from Orlando’s 96.9 The Game positing that Orlando is underrated in the Eastern Conference. Our basketball guru, Chris Herring, makes a guest appearance to help us break down this claim.Someone who is openly shaking in his boots this week is golfing great Jack Nicklaus. Tiger Woods’s victory at the Masters gave him his 15th major, just three behind Nicklaus’s all-time record. Does Tiger have it in him to catch Jack? Or do we expect this to be his last big victory?Inspired by Tiger’s feat, our Rabbit Hole dives into other statistically improbable comebacks.Here’s what we’re looking at this week:Chris breaks down how the Warriors blew a 31-point lead.And he provides takeaways from the opening weekend of the NBA playoffs.As per usual, our eyes are glued to our NBA predictions.We can’t get enough of Tiger Woods’s comeback.The Washington Post digs into Tiger’s odds for the rest of the season and into 2020.ESPN analyzes great comeback stories across sports.From our Rabbit Hole, this excellent video about Lonnie Smith from SB Nation. read more