Organisms Refusing to Evolve Over Millions of Years

first_imgSeveral more cases of “extreme stasis” have turned up, calling into question Darwin’s notion of constant, gradual change over millions of years.Earlier human migration: Science Magazine reports evidence of mammoth bones in Siberia that indicate hunting and butchering by humans, 10,000 years earlier than evolutionists presumed people should have been up those cold climes. New Scientist‘s headline reads, “Humans adapted to Arctic life 10,000 years earlier than thought.” The bones are claimed to be 45,000 years old; that means that humans were essentially the same as us—intelligent, adaptable and capable—for at least 8 times all recorded human history (actually, much longer: they believe upright, thinking hominins existed for 1-2 million years). That phrase “earlier than thought” shows up a lot in evolutionary studies. It means that evolutionists are surprised at cases of early appearance and stasis. This pattern stretches into much longer time periods in the following examples.Tree shrews refused to evolve for 34 million years, Science Magazine says. A new fossil doubles its period of stasis. It has a “living fossil” story to tell:Tree shrews are often held up as being living fossils, presumably very similar to our own earliest primate ancestor. The dearth of actual fossils of these small tropical mammals, however, has meant that much of this conclusion has been speculative. Li and Ni describe a new fossil tree shrew that is exceedingly similar to the extant pen-tailed tree shrew (Ptilocercus lowii), yet twice as old as any previously described sister taxa. The fossil suggests that this tree shrew has gone nearly unchanged since the Oligocene (over 34 million years ago).Squid stasis for a much longer period was reported in Live Science. Belemnites are members of the Cephalopod (head-foot) class that includes octopuses, squid and cuttlefish. Fossils found in Solnhofen, Germany (home of Archaeopteryx and other exceptionally-detailed fossils of the Jurassic Period) show that one species was already highly skilled. “Generally speaking, Acanthoteuthis‘ fins and bullet-shaped body, much like modern squids’, suggest that it would be a good swimmer,” the article says. The Jurassic is claimed to span from 200 to 145 million years ago. Noting that cephalopods date back even farther, “500 million years,” the article points out that squid like this possessed balance-sensing organs (statocysts), muscles, cartilage, a digestive system, and 10 arms. Cephalopods also have exquisite eyes as complex as those of mammals, yet are not related to any tetrapods in the evolutionary scheme. For a type of animal that is abundant today, this squid had an awful long time to evolve into something else, but it didn’t. Its statocysts, for instance, “resembled structures found in pelagic squid” that swim in the same oceans today.Crustacean stasis: A division of crustaceans called branchiopods includes many living species, including water fleas and fairy shrimp. Current Biology published a find with a headline that tells all: “A 365-Million-Year-Old Freshwater Community Reveals Morphological and Ecological Stasis in Branchiopod Crustaceans.” This phylum dates to the Cambrian Explosion. Early fossils of branchiopods have been found in fossil beds as widely dispersed as Canada, Scotland and Sweden. This new find in Belgium tops them all, yet looks strangely familiar:Here we report the discovery of an ephemeral pool branchiopod community from the 365-million-year-old Strud locality of Belgium. It is characterized by new anostracans and spinicaudatans, closely resembling extant species, and the earliest notostracan, Strudops goldenbergi. These branchiopods released resting eggs into the sediment in a manner similar to their modern representatives. We infer that this reproductive strategy was critical to overcoming environmental constraints such as seasonal desiccation imposed by living on land. The pioneer colonization of ephemeral freshwater pools by branchiopods in the Devonian was followed by remarkable ecological and morphological stasis that persists to the present day.Not only do the bodies (morphology) look the same, the whole community (ecology) looks the same. How do evolutionists deal with the fact that this fossil bed looks like it was buried recently? These biologists got creative with their Darwinian imaginations. The creatures evolved, they say, but not in ways that are visible to the human eye—they used encryption!The ecological and morphological stasis may be explained by the mixing of eggs from decades-distant populations, a singularity likely to prevent the fixation of new phenotypic variations. Nonetheless, the apparent morphological stasis does not mean that these clades did not evolve through time, but rather that the changes are cryptic, as revealed by changes in egg size. In addition, variations in physiology and egg hatching phenology have been reported for several species without significant morphological change and seem to be important for the long-term occupation of ephemeral pool biotopes. Fishes are generally absent in ephemeral pools, and increased fish predation in marine and fluvial environments during the Devonian may have triggered the modifications that allowed large branchiopods to colonize these continental environments devoid of predators. Paradoxically, the variable and harsh ephemeral pool appears to have been one of the most stable continental ecosystems over hundreds of millions of years.This admission is amazing. They found an ephemeral pool that should have been subject to variation and harsh environmental change, yet their dating of the fossils forces them to say it must have been “one of the most stable continental ecosystems over hundreds of millions of years.” Were there not meteors, tsunamis, continents subducting, and other dramatic geological changes, including major extinctions, in 365 million years?B as in billions: The winner for stasis is the bacterium. PhysOrg discusses “evidence of cavity-dwelling microbial life from 3 billion years ago,” from a time when there was not supposed to be oxygen or protection from UV radiation. Supposedly, South African greenstone beds allowed microbes to shield themselves by dwelling in cavities in the rock. Notice the word similar in what they say about these microbes:The team conducted multiple tests on the mats and the microbes found hidden under them, including bulk carbon and SEM analysis and Raman micro-spectroscopy and report that the microbes were shaped like rods, growing in train like filaments, similar to many bacteria alive today. They note also that the microbes were quite uniform in shape and that they were able to control their diameter and length as modern microbes do. The fossils are also approximately 500 million years older than any other previous fossil found in a habitat, and thus represent some of the earliest forms of life ever found (the very earliest date back to approximately 3.43 billion years ago.)With their short generation times, bacteria should evolve very rapidly. Wouldn’t anyone get bored living in a rod-shaped cell for billions of years?Wag your head in astonishment at the credulity of the modern evolutionary biologist. When they jumped onto Darwin’s bandwagon in 1859, and got drunk with his Darwine snake oil, their inhibitions over just-so storytelling faded away. They let go of their scientific rigor and all joined in singing, “How dry I am.” What they didn’t know was that Charlie bamboozled them. He sold them the Stuff Happens Law and tricked them into thinking Darwine was a health tonic; “Everything evolves constantly,” he would say, “except when it doesn’t. When something stays the same for billions of years, that’s evolution, too!” He used his own lyrics. He was really singing, “How wry I am.”(Visited 72 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

‘Make sure your doctor’s for real’

first_imgThe Health Professions Council of SA has urged the public to be on the look-out for bogus doctors. The council says many South Africans fall victim to fraudulent medical practitioners.The council said that if people are unsure of a doctor’s registration status, they have the right to ask any practitioner to produce his or her credit card size practising card. (Image: Health Professionals Council of SA, via Facebook)Brand South Africa reporterThe Health Professions Council of SA has urged the public to be on the look-out for bogus doctors, saying many people in both urban and rural areas could be falling prey to fraudulent medical practitioners.The call follows the uncovering of a bogus doctor who was “treating” people in Hammanskraal, north of Pretoria, and the jailing of a woman in the Eastern Cape who has been masquerading as a doctor for years.The council said that if people are unsure of a doctor’s registration status, they have the right to ask any practitioner to produce his or her credit card size practising card.Members of the public wanting to check if a doctor is registered and allowed to practice can also phone the council’s call centre at (012) 338-9300/1 or e-mail [email protected]“Not only do fictitious doctors bring the profession into disrepute, but also they endanger the lives of countless people they ‘treat’ every day”, said council chief executive Boyce Mkhize.The council keeps records of all medical practitioners, and anyone practising while not registered is breaking the law.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Jamieson wins Nelson Mandela Champs

first_imgAfter his superb eight-under-par 57, Jaco van Zyl tied for eighth with five others, including fellow South African Colin Nel, on six-under-par 125. Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo material ‘A fantastic achievement’“To get your name on any European trophy is a fantastic achievement,” Jamieson said after claiming the title, “but it’s a little more special when it’s for someone like Nelson [Mandela]. The 29-year-old Scot began the last round six shots off the lead, which belonged to South Africa’s Tim Clark and Denmark’s Morten Orum Madsen on five-under-par 60. Webster and De La Riva set the bar high with rounds of 60 and 61 respectively, but Jamieson went even better, firing an eight-under-par 57 to match them on seven-under 123. Jamieson left the course after his round, returning to his hotel but, when he realised that he might be in the running, he returned. It was a good thing he did as he tied Webster and De La Rive atop the leaderboard. A birdie and victoryThe second time around, a poor drive by Webster left him in the thick rough on the left and in trouble. He did superbly to save par after missing the green with his second shot, but Jamieson was bang on with his drive and approach and two-putted for a birdie and victory. 10 December 2012 MatchedJaco van Zyl managed to match Jamieson’s heroics, but a first round of three-over-par 68 left him out of the running for the title. He had to settle for a share of fourth, one shot off the lead, with Germany’s Maximilian Kieffer, England’s Matthew Nixon and the Dane Morten Orum Madsen. “At the start of the day I probably didn’t think I would be standing here holding the trophy, but I knew I needed a fast start and I was lucky enough to get that.” Rain played havoc with the new event, co-sanctioned by the Sunshine and European Tours, leading to the cancellation of the first two rounds and some holes being reduced in length for the last two rounds, which resulted in a par-65 course. LEADERBOARD 123 Scott Jamieson (Sco) (-7) 66, 57123 Steve Webster (Eng) (-7) 63, 60123 Eduardo De La Riva (Esp) (-7) 62, 61124 Maximilian Kieffer (Ger) (-6) 62, 62124 Matthew Nixon (Eng) (-6) 63, 61124 Morten Orum Madsen (Den) (-6) 60, 64124 Tim Clark (RSA) (-6) 60, 64125 Jaco van Zyl (-5) 68, 57125 Julien Quesne (Fra) (-5) 62, 63125 Sam Little (Eng) (-5) 62, 63 125 Colin Nel (RSA) (-5) 62, 63125 Bjorn Åkesson (Swe) (-5) 63, 62125 Matthew Southgate (Eng) (-5) 62 63 Jamieson, though, wouldn’t complain. The victory was his first on the European Tour in his third season as a professional, and it came after a stirring second round. Tim Clark, who was in a four-way tie for the lead after 10 holes, saw his chances slip away at the 17th. Needing a birdie on one of the last two holes to move into the outright lead, he found a bunker and then knocked his next shot over the green on his way to a double-bogey six. It took two extra visits to the 18th hole to decide the title. De La Riva was the first man to fall by the wayside after he failed to get up and down from a greenside bunker, leaving Jamieson and Webster to play the hole again after both posted pars on the first extra hole. Scott Jamieson needed 165 shots less than par in most tournaments to capture a rain-hit Nelson Mandela Championship at the Royal Durban Golf Club after a playoff against Steve Webster and Eduardo de la Riva.last_img read more

‘Our experiences are not because we’re an interracial couple – we’re just a couple.’

first_imgCassarica Nadas and Gareth Mays see themselves as an ordinary couple – even if other people refer to them as being in an interracial relationship. The pair has been dating for five years, having met online on a MXit chatroom.Cassarica Nadas met Gareth Mays on a MXit chatroom and fell in love after meeting him in person. The two speak about their families’ reaction when Mays became Nadas’ first boyfriend. (Image: Melissa Javan)Melissa JavanThere was a time in South Africa when laws such as the Group Areas Act, the Immorality Act and the Prohibition of Mixed Marriages Act stopped people of different races from having relationships or from living in the same communities.However, since the democratic dispensation brought South Africa’s Constitution and Bill of Rights, people such as Cassarica Nadas and Gareth Mays have been able to build close relationships without being harassed by the law.Mays and Nadas marked their fifth year as a couple on 8 November 2016. The two were in a long-distance relationship when Mays moved to Cape Town for work in January 2013. Nadas eventually moved to Cape Town in September 2014. They now live together in Johannesburg.In light of Brand South Africa’s campaign, Play Your Part and Know Your Constitution, Play Your Part and Live Your Constitution, which was launched in October, this couple have spoken about their relationship.The three-month-long campaign focuses on empowering people with knowledge and information about their rights as enshrined in the Bill of Rights. Brand South Africa says this awareness is integral to the promotion and advancement of South Africa’s constitutional values.Cassarica Nadas and Gareth Mays enjoy gaming and watching animation movies together. (Image: Melissa Javan)MJ: How old are you and where did you grow up?CN: I am 26. I grew up in Malabar, Port Elizabeth.GM: I’m 30. I’m also from Port Elizabeth, the friendly city.MJ: What month and year did you meet?CN: We met in August 2011.GM: Oh that’s trouble. I can’t say which month exactly, but it was mid-2011.MJ: How did you meet?CN: Gareth and I met while in a chatroom on MXit. I thought he was interesting and we continued to chat over the next couple of weeks. He then wanted to meet me in person, but I wasn’t sure if I wanted to. I was aware of all the horror stories people tell of meeting people online.One day after his badgering, I finally said yes and told him to come on that specific day or I wasn’t going to agree on meeting him again. I remember thinking there was no way he would come, with having responsibilities at work. I was so wrong. Gareth took off time from work and we met at the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University campus where we chatted for a few hours. I skipped class and he showed me the architecture building I had never seen on campus.GM: We met online, over MXit. I was charming and mysterious, of course.Cassarica Nadas says when people judge her and Gareth Mays’ relationship, they should think before they say hurtful things – even if it’s not to them. (Image: Melissa Javan)MJ: How did it feel when you started dating someone from a different culture?CN: There were no real feelings towards dating someone who was out of my culture. Gareth was my first boyfriend and I had more feeling towards my new relationship than any feelings towards his culture.Gareth’s family is very much like my own in a sense that they look after each other and I felt very comfortable with them. I also feel quite westernised in my own culture and I identified with Gareth’s culture more than what someone would think I did in my own culture.GM: My feelings were somewhat neutral, because cultural differences aren’t a major focus in my family. Essentially Cassie’s and my interests and habits were similar already.MJ: How did your families respond to your relationship?CN: My family were a bit cautious when I first introduced Gareth to them. He was the first boy I brought home who was not a friend. It was new to everyone. They didn’t have a problem with his race or culture. They had more of a problem that he was the guy who was taking away their daughter, like most parents have.GM: They were positive. Cassie is my sweetheart and probably more favourited by my parents than me.MJ: How have their attitudes changed or evolved over time?CN: My parents are very accepting of Gareth. They treat him like a son and are always buying him gifts. He is part of the family.GM: Only in the sense that we or they are closer and more loving.MJ: How did your family feel when you moved in together?CN: My parents were not keen at first. They are old school and have different principles and values. It was tough at first but they quickly came around. When we moved in together I moved to Cape Town from Port Elizabeth, so my parents were also dealing with my moving away as well as moving in with Gareth. We then moved from Cape Town to Johannesburg together. Skyping my parents helped a lot with this transition and I keep in touch via Whatsapp and phone calls.GM: My family is indifferent. We believe individuals are free to make their own choices. I suppose supportive would be more accurate to say. Bottom line is it was our choice, not anyone else’s.MJ: How do young people versus older people react when they see you together – especially strangers?CN: We have never really had any outwardly negative reactions from other people. Most people are accepting of us or hide it really well. Young people don’t seem to be bothered about our relationship but I do get some stares from the older generation when we are out shopping.GM: I’d say younger ages don’t really react differently. Older people may give one or two odd stares. This is the best time to kiss your girlfriend.MJ: What have been your worst and best experiences as an interracial couple?CN: The worst experience has been people judging Gareth based on the colour of his skin. I lived in a predominantly Indian and coloured neighbourhood. When Gareth used to drop me off at my parents’ house while we were still in Port Elizabeth, we had incidents of people who lived in my street making comments as I got out of the car. They would remark on his race and what car he drove.One lady who lived a street away from me saw my friend’s mum at a corner shop and said: “Cassie walks on egg shells, because of her white boyfriend who drives a BMW.” My friend’s mum didn’t even respond to that lady. I feel people are quick to pass judgement without knowing how it can hurt others.I wouldn’t say that there has been a best experience as an interracial couple, but we have had many experiences as a couple that have been amazing. A particular one was when we lived in Cape Town and we were walking to the shops. Gareth was helping me to put on a plaster because I had burnt my hand. To people who were passing by, it must have looked like he was proposing and this lady basically pushed half her body out the car window and started shouting at me to say “Yes!” and she wouldn’t stop until I did.Of course, he wasn’t proposing but it was wonderful to see a random person get excited for someone else’s happiness.GM: I really can’t say what the worst was. I guess those types of events I let go and move passed quickly. It’s no one’s business except our own. The best experiences are just like anybody else’s. I guess the only stories that spring to mind are when we approach counters or clerks and they don’t know we’re together so we let them think that till the last moment. Then a surprise kiss or hug throws them.MJ: What do you love most about each other?CN: My favourite things about Gareth are that he knows me very well it is almost scary. He knows when I want something and I haven’t asked yet, and then he just does it. It is almost as if he reads my mind. I also like that he is very intellectual and that we can discuss serious topics and joke about crazy things.GM: Cassie’s cheeky or mischievous laugh, or when she knows she’s up to nonsense and I catch her. I love her cute and lovable nature. Also, I love how much she likes unicorns. She makes me feel whole and happy.MJ: What do you have in common?CN: We love technology, gaming, and enjoy the same movies, especially superhero movies and animation.GM: We love being comfortable and growing together.MJ: Finish this sentence: Love is…CN: Being able to count on one another, to look past the flaws and accept all of a person.GM: Tea… and maybe roti.MJ: What do you like about the Constitution?CN: Our Constitution looks after our interests and makes it easier for us to be who we are. Without the Constitution in place we would not be able to express ourselves freely or be with who we love.GM: We have one of the best if not most advanced constitutions in the world. I’d say it is part of what makes me a proud citizen of this country.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa materiallast_img read more

Lionel Messi receives 5th Golden Shoe award for Europe’s top scorer

first_imgLATEST STORIES Is Luis Manzano planning to propose to Jessy Mendiola? SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting PSL Finals: F2 Logistics deals Petron its first loss, forces do-or-die Game 3 Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Lacson: 2019 budget delay due to P75-B House ‘insertion’ Hotel management clarifies SEAG footballers’ kikiam breakfast issue MOST READ FC Barcelona’s forward Lionel Messi during their La Liga soccer match between Levante UD and FC Barcelona at Ciutat de Valencia stadium in Valencia, Spain, Sunday, Dec. 16, 2018.(AP Photo/Jose Miguel Fernandez de Velasco)BARCELONA, Spain — Lionel Messi received his record fifth Golden Shoe award on Tuesday for leading all of Europe’s soccer leagues in scoring last season.Messi’s fifth win breaks the tie he had with Cristiano Ronaldo.ADVERTISEMENT PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss TS Kammuri to enter PAR possibly a day after SEA Games opening The 31-year-old Messi is Barcelona’s all-time leading scorer. The club credits him with 572 goals in 655 games.The Golden Shoe is awarded by European Sports Media, an association of European sports newspapers and magazines.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Messi scored 34 goals in the Spanish league last season to lead Barcelona to the title. Liverpool forward Mohamed Salah was the second leading scorer of Europe’s domestic leagues with 32 goals in England.Messi also won the award in 2009-10 (34 goals), 2011-12 (50), 2012-13 (46) and 2016-17 (37).FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefThe Argentina forward currently leads Europe’s top leagues with 14 goals this season.“I love football, but when I started I didn’t expect all this. My dream was to be a professional player,” Messi said. “This is thanks to the hard work and effort I have put in, and above all to my teammates. I have the best players in the world at their positions playing beside me.” View commentslast_img read more

Explosion rocks World Cup viewing venue in Nigeria, 13 killed

first_imgAt least 13 people including young children were killed when a bomb tore through a venue in northeast Nigeria where fans had gathered to watch a World Cup soccer match, witnesses said.Some people at the scene told Reuters an attacker dropped a device in front of the venue on Tuesday night in the town of Damaturu and ran off, while others said it was the work of a suicide bomber.No one claimed responsibility for the blast, but Damaturu and the surrounding Yobe state are at the heart of a five-year-old insurgency by Islamist group Boko Haram.The group was blamed for a an attack on another venue screening soccer matches in the northeastern state of Adamawa that killed at least 14 people and wounded 12.A Reuters reporter at Damaturu’s General Sani Abacha Specialist Hospital counted 13 people dead – including small children – and at least 20 wounded.The Nigerian government has advised people to avoid gathering in public to watch the World Cup, concerned about potential attacks.Many fans in soccer-mad Africa rely on informal venues – often open-sided structures with televisions set up in shops and side streets – to watch live coverage of the sport.Boko Haram – whose name roughly translates as “Western education is sinful” – has declared war on all signs of what it sees as corrupting Western influence.The group has killed thousands in its push to carve out an Islamic state in religiously-mixed Nigeria.last_img read more

August 12 2009 This is the fourth installment in

first_imgAugust 12, 2009 This is the fourth installment in a series of reports with the most recent 3D renderings of “SOLARE The Lean Linear City”. Excerpts from BEYOND GRIDLOCK Paolo Soleri’s Lean Linear City by Tomiaki Tamura, Cosanti Foundation, August 2009. [Waste Management] SOLARE’s urban structures certainly make waste material collection more efficient. The linear transportation system also provides easier access to processing and recycling locations, and to waste disposal sites. [3D rendering: YoungSoo Kim & text: Tomiaki Tamura] The biologically processed (composting) materials fill the landscaping and garden soil enrichment needs. The energy recovery system in forms of solid, liquid and gaseous materials can also be adopted. [3D rendering: YoungSoo Kim & text: Tomiaki Tamura] Perhaps the largest contribution to waste management in SOLARE is the reduction in the absolute amount of material consumption; redefining the “quality of life” by giving its residents pedestrian access to many amenities, so that each resident does not have to own everything (but can share), therefore creating an environment in which less materials are needed. [3D rendering: YoungSoo Kim & text: Tomiaki Tamura] [Agriculture/Greenhouse] Sustainable agriculture may be a somewhat elusive concept, especially with the complexity of varied and shifting environmental conditions, and socio-economic needs of the communities that produce and consume the goods involved in the process. [3D rendering: YoungSoo Kim & text: Tomiaki Tamura] However, humanity’s attempt to reduce the ecological footprint that supports our lifestyle necessitates bringing agricultural activities much closer to the habitat where the consumption occurs. SOLARE explores urban agriculture in the adjacent open field (close proximity to the human habitat) and vertical farm built into the structure where applicable. Another unique feature of SOLARE is the terraced greenhouse unit (Energy Apron) intended to extend the growing season and provide diversified horticulture and floriculture practices within its stratified micro-climatic conditions. This glazed productive environment substantially reduces the amount of water usage, while diverting excess heat to upper structures for space heating when needed. This report continues on 8/14/2009. [3D rendering: YoungSoo Kim & text: Tomiaki Tamura]last_img read more