Apple Just Got Serious About Killing Intel on Macs

first_img by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeKelley Blue Book5 Mid-engine Corvettes That Weren’tKelley Blue BookUndoGrepolis – Free Online GameGamers Around the World Have Been Waiting for this GameGrepolis – Free Online GameUndoForbes.comLebron’s Home Made This Forbes ListForbes.comUndoCNN International for ANAWhy Tennis Pundits Are Tipping This WomanCNN International for ANAUndoTODAYCeline Dion Discusses Her Recent Weight Loss: ‘Everything’s Fine’TODAYUndoMy Food and FamilyHealthy, Homemade Drunken Thai Noodles In Just 20 MinutesMy Food and FamilyUndoAdvertisement Phillip Tracy, Author Bio Apple just made a big move toward ditching Intel and outfitting its laptops with custom chips. Per a Bloomberg report, the Cupertino giant hired a lead engineer from ARM, the company that designs and licenses processors. In May, Apple reportedly hired Mark Filippo, a lead architect behind the chips that power most of the world’s smartphones and tablets, including the Cortex-A76, which was used in Qualcomm’s latest Snapdragon 855 SoC. When Filippo was poached by Apple, he was reportedly focused on developing processors for computers, an area he is familiar with having previously been employed at AMD and Intel.MacBook Air vs MacBook Pro: Which 13-inch MacBook Is Right For You?Apple’s entry-level MacBook Air and Pro look pretty similar, but our testing proved they differ in crucial ways.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Which Cheap Tablet Is Best? Amazon Fire 7 vs Walmart Onn02:45关闭选项Automated Captions – en-USAutomated Captions – en-USAutomated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.laptopmag.com/articles/apple-hire-arm-engineer-computer-processor?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0003:4603:46 MORE: MacBooks Could Ditch Intel for ARM Chips Sooner Than You Think“Mike was a long-time valuable member of the ARM community,” a spokesman at Arm told Bloomberg. “We appreciate all of his efforts and wish him well in his next endeavor.”Bloomberg suspects Filippo will slot into a position left open when Gerard Williams III, the head architect for chips in the iPhone and iPad, left the company. Apple doesn’t use Arm’s chip designs, but it does employ the company’s instruction set, which forms the basis of its internal processors. Apple is reportedly planning to abandon Intel and use custom-made processors for Mac computers as early as 2020. The move would let Apple have more control over its laptops while enabling Macs, iPhones and iPads to work more seamlessly together. We’ve seen the power of Apple’s in-house A-series chips in the latest iPads and iPhones. The A12X Bionic chip in the latest 12.9-inch iPad Pro blew away the competition in our synthetic benchmark tests and even outpaced many premium laptops outfitted with Core i7 CPUs, including the Dell XPS 13. Moving to a custom chip would not only give Apple more control over its ecosystem but it could end the company’s reliance on Intel, which has faced CPU supply shortage and struggled to decrease the size of its processor nodes, leading to multiple delays. Apple hasn’t gone on record with its plans to ditch Intel, but we should know more by the end of next year.Which MacBook Should You Buy? MacBook vs. Air vs. Procenter_img Phillip Tracy is a senior writer at Tom’s Guide and Laptop Mag, where he reviews laptops and covers the latest industry news. After graduating with a journalism degree from the University of Texas at Austin, Phillip became a tech reporter at the Daily Dot. There, he wrote reviews for a range of gadgets and covered everything from social media trends to cybersecurity. Prior to that, he wrote for RCR Wireless News and NewBay Media. When he’s not tinkering with devices, you can find Phillip playing video games, reading, listening to indie music or watching soccer. Phillip Tracy, last_img read more