Global Cebu settles for 2nd in Singapore

first_imgCoco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set LATEST STORIES Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ Albirex scored two more from the spot, before Salenga’s effort was parried away for the final count.Global is the first Filipino team to reach the final of the event—CEDELF P. TUPASSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Kiss-and-tell matinee idol’s conquests: True stories or tall tales? OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene Jo Koy: My brain always wants to think funny It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson Global Cebu’s historic run in the RHB Singapore Cup 2017 came to a heartbreaking end on Saturday after the Philippine club bowed to Albirex Niigata in a penalty shootout at Jalan Besar Stadium.The Filipinos equalized twice to send the game to a shootout only to falter, 1-3, as the Japanese-flavored side playing in the Singapore League wrested the crown for the second straight season.ADVERTISEMENTcenter_img Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award MOST READ “You can see we came here to do what we had to do, so credit to the players who never gave up,” said Global Cebu coach Akbar Nawas.Former National U star Paolo Salenga sent the game to extra time by heading home a free kick from Pika Minegishi in the 109th minute, after Kento Nagasaki put Albirex ahead, 2-1, in the 96th minute.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSBack on the throneGlobal defender Wesley Dos Santos also scored off a Minegishi free kick in the first half to cancel out Tsubasa Sano’s opener.But it was Albirex which held its nerve in the shootout with Global missing the first two attempts from Dos Santos and Daruy Roberts, while Albirex converted one out of two —with Sano missing after Nagasaki converted. View comments Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set Magsayo keeps int’l feather crown Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’last_img read more

Fort St John ranks sixth on 2020 list for Best Cities for Work in BC

first_img– Advertisement -Neighbouring cities to rank on the list include Dawson Creek at 27 and Prince George in 44th place. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – BCBusiness Magazine has released its annual list for the ‘Best Cities for Work in British Columbia’ for 2020. Out of the 46 cities ranked, with one being the best city and 46 being the worst, Fort St. John came in at number six on the list for one of the ‘Best Cities for Work’. In 2019, Fort St. John ranked in 9th place. For the list, a total of 46 cities across B.C., with 10,000 or more permanent residents, were ranked based on 10 economic indicators with weightings ranging from 5 to 15 percent. Some of those indicators included items such as employment, commute times, and primary real estate value. Information for this ranking is based on Statistics Canada data.last_img read more

Scientific Institutions Engage in Leftist Advocacy

first_imgFor an enterprise supposedly as unpolitical and bias-free as science classically is supposed to be, conservatism is surprisingly rare.Since we last reported the leftist bias in scientific institutions (Jan 19, 2012), has there been any shift to the right?  any penitence for embracing and promoting one political party?  No; it has gotten worse.   Here are just a few of the most egregious examples in recent days.  These not only state leftist positions, but openly advocate them.Anti-Israel:  The only redeeming feature of this example is that at least Science magazine published a protest letter by John R. Cohn of Thomas Jefferson University.  The Science May 18 cover story was a special feature on “Human Conflict.”  Out of all the possible pictures of human conflict imaginable, what did the editors of Science choose?  It was a photo of a bombed-out building attributed to the Israeli Defense forces.  Cohn’s letter, published two months later, accused the editors of politicizing science:I am writing in reaction to the cover photo and accompanying caption selected for the 18 May special issue on Human Conflict. It seems disingenuous to claim that of all the world’s conflicts, a building identified as destroyed by the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) was “not [chosen] for any political message or endorsement.” Nobody eschews war more than Israelis, who, unfortunately, also know the consequences.If the editors wanted striking visual impact and gruesome evidence of inhumanity, there were better choices: the killing fields of Cambodia, the destruction of the World Trade Center, Rwanda, Dresden, Hiroshima, Bataan, Darfur, Armenia, Normandy, Auschwitz… unfortunately, the list of greater carnage is nearly endless.By identifying the IDF as perpetrators, the caption undermined the photo’s role as a generic illustration of the consequences of conflict. Indeed, there was no need to identify the details. They were a distraction. The photo no longer represented abstract human violence, but rather one more illustration of Israel, taken out of context. Portraying Israel as the aggressor obscures the fact that the country is trying to defend itself against decades of assaults provoked by ethnic hostility—attacks still taking place. That is politicized science, which serves to encourage—not discourage—conflict.Scientists advising Obama:  What should a science news site have to do with presidential politics?  Nothing, really.  But PhysOrg published the views of two UK scientists taking it upon themselves to act as his campaign advisors: “Obama needs to show Americans he’s still ‘one of them’,” the headline reads, followed by PhysOrg’s summary, “To win a second term in office, President Obama needs to persuade voters that he is still one of them – and recapture some of the charisma that help [sic] propel him to the top four years ago.”  No such advice was found anywhere on PhysOrg advising Romney how to win.Scientists advocating for leftist NGO’s:  It is common knowledge that environmental groups, particularly non-governmental agencies (NGOs) such as the Sierra Club, are predominantly (though not exclusively) leftist in ideology – particularly those lobbying for government intervention in private property rights and action against global warming.  Another PhysOrg article advocated this in its headline: “Environmental groups should pool efforts to reach the public.”  One would think a science news site would stick to the facts about the environment, not provide advice on how to sway public opinion.Unhealthy theists:  Another prominent science news site promulgated a highly questionable psychological study that materialists are healthier – questionable because such studies are loaded with untestable variables.  In “Mind Vs. Body? Dualist Beliefs Linked With Less Concern for Healthy Behaviors,” Science Daily uncritically promoted the idea that those who believe the mind is separate from the brain are likely to engage in unhealthy behavior, calling the research “findings” instead of suggestions or opinions.  Without doubt, hard-core secular Darwinists are likely to be materialists, not attributing the mind to a soul or spirit.Same-sex marriage and the church:  A particularly egregious example of leftist ideology masquerading as “science” is found in a PhysOrg story entitled, “College students likely to disagree with religious teachings that homosexuality is a sin.”  Saturating this report about University of Michigan Michael Woodford’s views on how to overcome student’s parental and church teachings about marriage are biased words intended to show conservatives as backward and liberal churches as open-minded.  PhysOrg joined left foot in to the leftist professor’s advocacy of same-sex marriage: “College students’ beliefs about same-sex relationships can be shaped by their church’s teachings, but some are willing to oppose their religion’s position on the issue, a new University of Michigan study indicated.  And this can influence students’ views about same-sex marriage.”  Topics like sin and marriage have no place in a science news site, but PhysOrg’s complicity in Woodford’s anti-conservative advocacy that seeks to undo what parents and churches have taught their children echoes intolerant rhetoric this week from certain politicians attacking the Chick Fil-A food chain for its president’s vocal stand for traditional marriage (see Family Research Council article).Burn the heretics:  What happens when a scientist goes rogue and steps outside the leftist consensus?  He or she had better wear armor and combat boots, if not a flame-proof fireman’s suit.  Look at the case of Mark Regnerus (U of Texas), whose politically-incorrect research (reported here 6/10/2012) indicated that traditional families are better for children than same-sex parent homes.  All fury broke loose against him from the sociological science community, according to Christian Smith at the Chronicle of Higher Education, who likened their response to an “academic auto-da-fé” (a reference to Spanish Inquisition celebrations of burning heretics at the stake).  Regnerus’ attempt to state his findings in the gentlest, fairest, most tolerant manner possible were no protection.  See also “Science Lies Bleeding: A Ballad for Honesty” by Kathryn Jean Lopez at National Review.Wait a minute, the reader hesitates … I’m confused.  Aren’t liberals supposed to be the champions of tolerance?  Aren’t these the ones promoting diversity?  Isn’t their favorite word inclusion?Now you understand the mindset of the Darwin Party.  With few exceptions, they are cut of the same cloth.  Leftists whimper for academic freedom when in the minority.  But once they get power, they become  intellectual bigots and bullies, with no tolerance for the inclusion of diverse views outside of those that are progressive, leftist, liberal, and even radical.If you find any politically conservative Darwinists who support traditional marriage, the US Constitution, private property rights, the free market, individual liberty, limited government, free speech and scientific integrity, send him to the embassy for protection from the next academic auto-da-fé. 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Organisms Refusing to Evolve Over Millions of Years

first_imgSeveral more cases of “extreme stasis” have turned up, calling into question Darwin’s notion of constant, gradual change over millions of years.Earlier human migration: Science Magazine reports evidence of mammoth bones in Siberia that indicate hunting and butchering by humans, 10,000 years earlier than evolutionists presumed people should have been up those cold climes. New Scientist‘s headline reads, “Humans adapted to Arctic life 10,000 years earlier than thought.” The bones are claimed to be 45,000 years old; that means that humans were essentially the same as us—intelligent, adaptable and capable—for at least 8 times all recorded human history (actually, much longer: they believe upright, thinking hominins existed for 1-2 million years). That phrase “earlier than thought” shows up a lot in evolutionary studies. It means that evolutionists are surprised at cases of early appearance and stasis. This pattern stretches into much longer time periods in the following examples.Tree shrews refused to evolve for 34 million years, Science Magazine says. A new fossil doubles its period of stasis. It has a “living fossil” story to tell:Tree shrews are often held up as being living fossils, presumably very similar to our own earliest primate ancestor. The dearth of actual fossils of these small tropical mammals, however, has meant that much of this conclusion has been speculative. Li and Ni describe a new fossil tree shrew that is exceedingly similar to the extant pen-tailed tree shrew (Ptilocercus lowii), yet twice as old as any previously described sister taxa. The fossil suggests that this tree shrew has gone nearly unchanged since the Oligocene (over 34 million years ago).Squid stasis for a much longer period was reported in Live Science. Belemnites are members of the Cephalopod (head-foot) class that includes octopuses, squid and cuttlefish. Fossils found in Solnhofen, Germany (home of Archaeopteryx and other exceptionally-detailed fossils of the Jurassic Period) show that one species was already highly skilled. “Generally speaking, Acanthoteuthis‘ fins and bullet-shaped body, much like modern squids’, suggest that it would be a good swimmer,” the article says. The Jurassic is claimed to span from 200 to 145 million years ago. Noting that cephalopods date back even farther, “500 million years,” the article points out that squid like this possessed balance-sensing organs (statocysts), muscles, cartilage, a digestive system, and 10 arms. Cephalopods also have exquisite eyes as complex as those of mammals, yet are not related to any tetrapods in the evolutionary scheme. For a type of animal that is abundant today, this squid had an awful long time to evolve into something else, but it didn’t. Its statocysts, for instance, “resembled structures found in pelagic squid” that swim in the same oceans today.Crustacean stasis: A division of crustaceans called branchiopods includes many living species, including water fleas and fairy shrimp. Current Biology published a find with a headline that tells all: “A 365-Million-Year-Old Freshwater Community Reveals Morphological and Ecological Stasis in Branchiopod Crustaceans.” This phylum dates to the Cambrian Explosion. Early fossils of branchiopods have been found in fossil beds as widely dispersed as Canada, Scotland and Sweden. This new find in Belgium tops them all, yet looks strangely familiar:Here we report the discovery of an ephemeral pool branchiopod community from the 365-million-year-old Strud locality of Belgium. It is characterized by new anostracans and spinicaudatans, closely resembling extant species, and the earliest notostracan, Strudops goldenbergi. These branchiopods released resting eggs into the sediment in a manner similar to their modern representatives. We infer that this reproductive strategy was critical to overcoming environmental constraints such as seasonal desiccation imposed by living on land. The pioneer colonization of ephemeral freshwater pools by branchiopods in the Devonian was followed by remarkable ecological and morphological stasis that persists to the present day.Not only do the bodies (morphology) look the same, the whole community (ecology) looks the same. How do evolutionists deal with the fact that this fossil bed looks like it was buried recently? These biologists got creative with their Darwinian imaginations. The creatures evolved, they say, but not in ways that are visible to the human eye—they used encryption!The ecological and morphological stasis may be explained by the mixing of eggs from decades-distant populations, a singularity likely to prevent the fixation of new phenotypic variations. Nonetheless, the apparent morphological stasis does not mean that these clades did not evolve through time, but rather that the changes are cryptic, as revealed by changes in egg size. In addition, variations in physiology and egg hatching phenology have been reported for several species without significant morphological change and seem to be important for the long-term occupation of ephemeral pool biotopes. Fishes are generally absent in ephemeral pools, and increased fish predation in marine and fluvial environments during the Devonian may have triggered the modifications that allowed large branchiopods to colonize these continental environments devoid of predators. Paradoxically, the variable and harsh ephemeral pool appears to have been one of the most stable continental ecosystems over hundreds of millions of years.This admission is amazing. They found an ephemeral pool that should have been subject to variation and harsh environmental change, yet their dating of the fossils forces them to say it must have been “one of the most stable continental ecosystems over hundreds of millions of years.” Were there not meteors, tsunamis, continents subducting, and other dramatic geological changes, including major extinctions, in 365 million years?B as in billions: The winner for stasis is the bacterium. PhysOrg discusses “evidence of cavity-dwelling microbial life from 3 billion years ago,” from a time when there was not supposed to be oxygen or protection from UV radiation. Supposedly, South African greenstone beds allowed microbes to shield themselves by dwelling in cavities in the rock. Notice the word similar in what they say about these microbes:The team conducted multiple tests on the mats and the microbes found hidden under them, including bulk carbon and SEM analysis and Raman micro-spectroscopy and report that the microbes were shaped like rods, growing in train like filaments, similar to many bacteria alive today. They note also that the microbes were quite uniform in shape and that they were able to control their diameter and length as modern microbes do. The fossils are also approximately 500 million years older than any other previous fossil found in a habitat, and thus represent some of the earliest forms of life ever found (the very earliest date back to approximately 3.43 billion years ago.)With their short generation times, bacteria should evolve very rapidly. Wouldn’t anyone get bored living in a rod-shaped cell for billions of years?Wag your head in astonishment at the credulity of the modern evolutionary biologist. When they jumped onto Darwin’s bandwagon in 1859, and got drunk with his Darwine snake oil, their inhibitions over just-so storytelling faded away. They let go of their scientific rigor and all joined in singing, “How dry I am.” What they didn’t know was that Charlie bamboozled them. He sold them the Stuff Happens Law and tricked them into thinking Darwine was a health tonic; “Everything evolves constantly,” he would say, “except when it doesn’t. When something stays the same for billions of years, that’s evolution, too!” He used his own lyrics. He was really singing, “How wry I am.”(Visited 72 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Industry News: Introducing RED’s New GEMINI 5K S35 Sensor

first_imgFor their latest trick, RED brings us a new 5K sensor, while introducing two sensitivity modes with improved low-light performance.Cover image via RED.RED’s new camera sensor comes in its familiar EPIC W body but packs a powerful new low light punch with its improved 5120X3000 size. However, the biggest attraction is the dual ISO capability, offering users more freedom to toggle back and forth as you move from day to night. While I doubt this’ll shake up the film industry, it could mean RED’s other models come down in price. We’ll see! Let’s take a look at this beast.“If resolution is important, the HELIUM 8K S35 sensor, recipient of the highest DxOMark score ever, allows content creators everywhere to deliver ultra-detailed still and motion images. If flexibility or performance in low-light is key, GEMINI 5K S35 sets new standards in versatility and shadow detail.”—REDLow light mode is like shifting your total dynamic range down two stops. In the video, we see 3200 ISO with the new sensor just as clear as images exposed in Standard mode at 800 ISO. So there’s the real kicker with this camera: low light performance. This could be a real problem-solver for professionals consistently shooting in low-light settings. We’ll see.Here are the specs.New 5K S35 sensor. 15.4 Megapixel Dual Sensitivity CMOS Sensor.Seamless switching between Standard and Low Light modes.Improved Dynamic Range.Ships with IPP2.5K up to 96 fps Full Format.4K up to 30 fps and 2K up to 120 fps using ProRes or Avid.Simultaneously record REDCODE plus ProRes or Avid.Up to 275 MB/s write speeds.Interchangeable lens mount. Looking for more industry coverage? Check out these articles.Camera Rumor: DJI Phantom 5 Might Be Getting Interchangeable LensesAn Interview with Andrew Shulkind, DP of Netflix Original film The RitualFilmmaking Lessons from Oscar-Nominated DirectorsSXSW Tips: How to Take Your VR Experience to the Next LevelInterview: Showtime Docuseries Cinematographer from The Tradelast_img read more