Laguna Novigrad bought Dalmatia hotels

first_imgLaguna Novigrad dd, one of the leading tourist companies operating under the Aminess hotels and campsites brand, has concluded an agreement to take over Dalmacija hotela doo, which is majority owned by HTP Korčula and HTP Orebić. Cover photo: HTP Korcula, Port 9 The companies owned by Dalmacija Hotel have 7 hotels, an apartment complex and a camp with mobile homes with a total capacity of 1.000 accommodation units, while 6 hotels, 3 camps with mobile homes and a complex of villas in Istria, Kvarner and Dalmatia with a capacity of 3.850 accommodation units already operate under the Aminess brand. The combined companies employ more than 800 workers, and last year they realized about 1,43 million overnight stays with a revenue of 440 million kuna. “With this acquisition, HTP Korčula and HTP Orebić get a quality and proven partner that will ensure the continuation of successful business and added value for destination development. The takeover itself is coming, in a difficult time for tourism that we have not witnessed since the Homeland War, but it also shows the confidence of investors in the long-term perspective and sustainability of Croatian tourism. We are focused on achieving the synergy effects of united companies as soon as possible and preparing for the next, in many ways, challenging season. The goal is to connect and jointly develop all destinations in order to get the best possible tourist and economic effect, and preserve jobs in a region where tourism is one of the most important industries. The task is not simple, but we believe in the quality and potential of Korcula and Peljesac”, Said the President of the Management Board of Laguna Novigrad, Zrinka Bokulić. Aminess recently expanded its business to the island of Krk by taking over the management of the tourist company Hoteli Njivice doo, whose ultimate majority owners are also Oleg Uskoković and J&T Private Equity Group Croatia Investments. The company consists of two hotels, a villa complex and a camp that now operates under the Aminess brand. The value of the transaction is 140 million kuna, which will be provided by Laguna Novigrad by recapitalizing the indirect majority owner, the company Auctor Holding as from Prague, which is owned Oleg Uskokovic and J&T Private Equity Group Croatia Investments from Prague. The right to participate in the recapitalization of Laguna Novigrad will be provided to other shareholders in proportion to their participation in the share capital of the company. Considering the capacities and development potentials, the business goal of Laguna Novigrad is to be included among the 5 leading hotel groups in Croatia. With regard to the acquisition of a majority stake in the companies HTP Korčula and HTP Orebić, Laguna Novigrad will announce a mandatory offer to take over the remaining shares within the prescribed period.  Dalmatia Hotels was established by the Prosperus FGS Economic Cooperation Fund, which became the majority owner in 2014 as part of a pre-bankruptcy settlement, thus avoiding the bankruptcy of two key hotel companies in southern Dalmatia.last_img read more

2018’s top homes revealed and Queensland reno projects are right up there among them

first_imgB & B Residence in Paddington, designed by Hogg & Lamb. Picture: Christopher Frederick Jones.A Morningside home in the same category, designed by Kieron Gait Architects took the approach of adding to the highset 1920s house by connecting it back to its garden via a pavilion. The original Queenslander was now a “retreat” containing the bedrooms and a TV and craft room while the new “garden pavilion” houses the kitchen, dining room and living areas. “Connected by a covered, but open deck and link, it encourages breezes through the site and allows the family to feel like they are within thegarden domain.” Crescent House in Seven Hills, by architecture firm Deicke Richards with Steven Clegg Design. Picture: Christopher Frederick JonesArchitect Jolyon Robinson, whose design for Avonlea saw it short-listed for the new house over 200sq m award as well as the sustainability gong, said the project was bittersweet for him as the property was on the site of his childhood home.“That house was probably the most special to me because our family home used to be on that site when we were kids,” he told The Sunday Mail. “The old Queenslander burnt down nine years ago and I was commissioned by the new owners to design them a new family home. Terrarium House in Highgate Hill by architecture firm John Ellway. Picture: Toby Scott.Also in the category was JB House in Capalaba by Reddog Architects which looked at reutilising the existing home and reconfiguring it for passive environmental control, taking a “simple approach” that revealed “points of intersection between new and old and use ordinary materials to create extraordinary spaces”.“This extension to a single storey, brick veneer home in Brisbane’s east is an example of a new wave of alterations and additions projects in the city’s suburbs,” the firm said in its statement on the project. Bungalow Garden Rooms in Paddington — Architect Myers Ellyett with Dan Young Landscape Architect. Picture: Cathy Schusler.It will face stiff competition from fellow Queenslanders, with an Auchenflower project called Bungalow Garden Rooms by Myers Ellyett with Dan Young Landscape Architectalso up for thelandscape award nationally, and three others also up for the “over 200sq m” renovation prize.A Paddington home called B & B Residence designed by Hogg & Lamb tackled turned an existing inner-city Queenslander cottage on a steep site into a reinvigorated private, functional space. “Views are edited while portions of the sky, trees and mountains are carefully framed through a series of openings, peepholes and voids,” was how Hogg & Lamb described it. Yeronga House by Tim Bennetton Architects. Picture: Shantanu Starick.Smaller renovations under 200sq m out of Queensland also caught the judges’ eyes, three of which were now in the shortlist for nationals including Terrarium House in Highgate Hill by John Ellway, where a 100-year-old cottage was jettisoned into the 21st century with a sympathetic upgrade that involved inhabiting the undercroft. ”The house began as an exercise in pragmatics,” was how the firm described the challenge. More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus19 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market19 hours agoMorningside Residence by Kieron Gait Architects. Picture: Christopher Frederick Jones.The fourth house to make the cut for its “over 200sq m” renovation work was Yeronga House by Tim Bennetton Architects in Brisbane. The low key Queenslander was transformed with a new pod or studio created to the rear of the house, separated by a walkway and series of decks going to the garden. They even raised the level of the garden to avoid the use of all balustrades. Avonlea in Eumundi gave Robinson Architects a chance to make the most of the site. Picture: Nic Granleese.“It was a labour of love. I obviously knew the site but hadn’t been there for 20 years. “The old Queenslander was beautiful but hot in summer and cold in winter. Having a blank canvas and the ability to get all the fundamentals right like orientation and windows was so great.”Of the seven Queensland renovations that made the national cut, four were for alteration and addition over 200sq m, including Seven Hills property Crescent House by Deicke Richards and Steven Clegg Design. The home was also short-listed in the garden or landscape category nationally. center_img Avonlea in Eumundi, designed by Robinson Architects. Picture: Nic Granleese.QUEENSLAND home renovations from garden rooms to pavilions and undercroft rejuvenation have made the cut in the battle for top national honours.Eleven homes in the Sunshine State were short-listed for the 2018 Houses Awards — and in a nod to the record surge in renovations, seven of the houses were upgrades.Juror Stuart Vokes, director of Vokes and Peters Queensland which won the coveted Australian House of the Year last year, was blown away by the calibre of designs coming out of Queensland.The work was so good that two homes were nominated for double awards: Avonlea by Robinson Architects in Eumundi and Crescent House in Brisbane’s Seven Hills byDeicke Richards with Steven Clegg Design. JB House in Capalaba by Reddog Architects. Picture: Christopher Frederick Jones.Monash Road House in Tarragindi by the firm Zuzana and Nicholas made it a triple out of Brisbane for the smaller renovation category, using a strategy of “minimal intervention”.The project involved “renovations to an existing post war house in Tarragindi, Queensland, through minimal interventions and new insertions within the old house” was how the firm described their work. Monash Road House in Tarragindi by architecture firm Zuzana and Nicholas. Picture: Toby Scott.Two new houses over 200sq m made the shortlist too — one out of Ashgrove called Glenlyon Estate by Push Architecture and Louise Walsh Interior Design and the other a glass pavilion wrapped in timber sliding screens titled Tinbeerwah House by Teeland Architects in the Noosa Hinterland. Glenlyon Estate in Ashgrove by Push Architecture and Louise Walsh Interior Design. Picture: Maree Homer.The idea was to open the Noosa home “to the bush, ocean, stars and sky”, with hardwood screens allowing the owners to control light, breezes, privacy and views. “The long thin plan ensures the building is only one room deep to maximise, ocean views, cross ventilation and natural light. The house layout allows the family to come together to cook, eat and relax, but also the separation of more quiet spaces for reflective time.” Tinbeerwah House in the Noosa hinterland by Teeland Architects. Picture: Jared Fowler.The 2018 Houses Award is in its eighth year and saw the highest number of entries ever, with 477 submissions, up 7 per cent on 2017.Houses magazine editor and 2018 juror, Katelin Butler, said it was “great to see our talented architects and designers experimenting and challenging the status quo, resulting in a series of surprising and delightful architectural moments.” The winners will be announced on July 27. QUEENSLAND HOMES IN 2018 HOUSES AWARD SHORTLIST: Avonlea (New House over 200m2 and Sustainability) B & B Residence (House Alteration & Addition over 200m2) Bungalow Garden Rooms (Garden or Landscape) Crescent House (Garden or Landscape and House Alteration & Addition over 200m2) Glenlyon Estate (New House over 200m2) JB House (House Alteration & Addition under 200m2) Monash Road House (House Alteration & Addition under 200m2) Morningside Residence (House Alteration & Addition over 200m2 ) Terrarium House (House Alteration & Addition under 200m2) Tinbeerwah House (New House over 200m2) Yeronga House (House Alteration & Addition over 200m2)last_img read more

Flurry of SU men’s soccer missed chances lead to scoreless tie with Pittsburgh

first_img Published on September 26, 2010 at 12:00 pm Facebook Twitter Google+ Opportunity after opportunity was created. Some seemed perfect. Goals probably should have been scored. But they all missed, including perhaps the Syracuse men’s soccer team’s clearest chance at a goal, thanks to Nick Roydhouse. The minute-long buildup reflected the entire 110 minutes. When it was over, the lost chances yielded a 0-0 tie for SU (1-4-2) against Pittsburgh (4-2-1). But even though it was one point rather than three, for Orange head coach Ian McIntyre, it was an important point against a winning team. ‘The way things went out, that was a good point,’ McIntyre said. On that clear scoring chance, SU defender Jakob Karlgren streaked to the corner, tearing down the left side of the field, only to encounter two Pittsburgh defenders at the end line. With some fancy footwork, Karlgren was past the defenders on the inside. He crossed the ball straight back through the middle of the box, where SU midfielder Roydhouse was perfectly positioned. Roydhouse wound up, but rocketed the ball right off the crossbar. That’s how the game went for the Orange. An SU team that has had trouble making chances for itself ended up creating those opportunities, putting pressure on its Big East rival all game. SU was unable to find the back of the net, but Syracuse felt the final score was slightly better than the tie indicated. The game demonstrated Syracuse can compete with teams that have better records. What’s more, the team earned that point within its Big East division.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text ‘We’ll at least be second (in the division),’ McIntyre said. ‘There’s a long way to go, but this will give the guys a lot of heart. Because sometimes, it’s not going to be pretty. But if we can work and get that result, good things can happen.’ With the single point awarded for the tie, the Orange is now in second place in the Red Division, with three teams tied for first. Already, conference play has proven to be highly competitive. The game was back and forth with each defense taking a pounding. Orange goalkeeper Jeremy Vuolo is in charge of regulating the game speed as much as possible. He can either distribute the ball quickly for a fast counterattack or hold on to the ball to give the players a chance to slow down. Saturday, he held on to the ball. ‘A lot of times, we had been under pressure for a while, for a couple of minutes,’ Vuolo said. ‘They had really been hitting us for a while, so I’ll intentionally take as much time as I can. Let the guys get a breath, relax, step up and then kick it. Just give them time to calm down and relax a little bit.’ Although Roydhouse said he was happy to get a chance to catch his breath, especially as the game went into overtime, he was hardly relaxed. Particularly going into the second half, he took it upon himself to energize his teammates. His preferred method of inspiration turned out to be verbal altercations with any Panther who looked at him the wrong way. Roydhouse was not carded, but he did manage to discuss proper soccer etiquette with two or three different members of the Pittsburgh team, while simultaneously tugging shirts and bumping shoulders. ‘I thought we lacked a little bit of character in the first half,’ McIntyre said. ‘So we needed a spark, and we needed some kind of energy out there, and Roydhouse brings that.’ This energy was effective. Syracuse had only two shots in the first half, but finished the game with 12. It was the second most the team has had all season. Pittsburgh got the better of the Orange, with 22 shots, yet Vuolo said he was never concerned. ‘Opportunities are going to come few and far between,’ Vuolo said. ‘In terms of creating more, 12 shots in a game is excellent. … In terms of that stat, we’re not bothered. Twelve shots is great for us.’ Vuolo’s positive attitude is a testament to how pleased the team was with the opportunities it was creating. All that’s left is getting the ball in the back of the net. Roydhouse knows what the offense needs to do. Now the team just has to do it. ‘If we get the ball in behind them, that’s when we look good,’ Roydhouse said. ‘That’s when we create chances.’ [email protected]center_img Commentslast_img read more

Serena Williams through to Wimbledon final

first_imgThe women’s top seed continued the defence of her title with an emphatic semi-final victory over Elena Vesnina this afternoon.Williams dropped lost just two games on her way to a 6-2 6-0 win.last_img