Hispanic ”duality” offers both challenges and opportunities

first_img continue reading » When I arrived in the United States in 1991 to study economics at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire on a Fulbright Scholarship, the first question people inevitably asked me was, “Where are you from?” I was born and raised in Panama, so the answer was easy each time I was asked. And I was asked the question a lot.For the most part, I’ve lived in the U.S. ever since that time. I married my wife—a Wisconsin native— and settled in the city of Janesville where we raised a son and a daughter. I was granted U.S. citizenship in 2014 and carry a U.S. passport. And I still get asked the question, “Where are you from?” These days, the answer isn’t quite as simple.Like many Hispanics in America, I identify strongly both with my country of origin and my adopted home. Fluent in both Spanish and English, I move comfortably in both worlds, and yet don’t feel fully a part of either one. There’s a duality to my life, an “in-between,” a situation that exists for many Hispanics. I tend to think of it as an “otherness,” with both feet planted firmly in each of two distinctly different cultures and not fully anchored to either one.Fortunately, I’ve turned what some see as an insurmountable challenge into distinct opportunities. It took a while for me as a young man to learn the norms and behaviors acceptable in my new American home. But I was an eager student and made it a point to understand and accept changes without fully losing aspects of my Panamanian culture and heritage. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Hamilton claims pole position for British Grand Prix

first_imgLewis Hamilton smashed the track record twice on Saturday to grab a record seventh British Grand Prix pole position with a stunning performance in a tense qualifying session. Hamilton, who on Sunday seeks a record-increasing seventh Silverstone victory, finished ahead of his Mercedes team-mate Valtteri Bottas by more than three-tenths of a second after the Finn had been fastest in final practice and then again in both Q2 and Q3 when he also set lap records. The defending six-time champion and current series leader bounced back from a ragged performance, including a spin, in the first parts of qualifying to claim his 65th pole with Mercedes and the record-increasing 91st of his career. It was also a record eighth successive Mercedes pole success in Britain on a day when they were clear of their nearest rivals Red Bull by a full second, Max Verstappen taking third place on the grid ahead of Ferrari’s Charles Leclerc. Rising British star Lando Norris, 20, was fifth for McLaren ahead of Lance Stroll in Racing Point’s ‘pink Mercedes’, Carlos Sainz in the second McLaren, Daniel Ricciardo and his Renault team-mate Esteban Ocon and Sebastian Vettel, who was 10th for Ferrari. “This track is awesome! But it is tough out there – with the winds, it is like juggling balls on a moving plate,” said a delighted Hamilton. Today was such a challenging day, struggled with the balance and generally putting together laps fast enough. I managed to pull out two solid laps at the end to secure my 91st pole position. I’m grateful to my team for providing me the package to do what I do #BritishGP pic.twitter.com/imlGJMn5A0— Lewis Hamilton (@LewisHamilton) August 1, 2020 Promoted ContentBest Car Manufacturers In The WorldBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeThis Guy Photoshopped Himself Into Celeb Pics And It’s Hysterical7 Things That Actually Ruin Your Phone9 Best Movie Robots Of All TimeThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read More14 Hilarious Comics Made By Women You Need To Follow Right NowMost Popular Movies With Sylvester Stallone2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This Year10 Greatest Disney Female Villains We Love AnywaysWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?7 Black Hole Facts That Will Change Your View Of The Universe Loading… Read Also: BREAKING: Arteta’s Arsenal lifts 2019-20 FA Cup “I had a spin and as you know qualifying is all about confidence and I was struggling in the first sectors of every lap, but I took some deep breaths, composed myself and in Q3 I had a clear lap and the second one was even better!” He added that it was strange to drive without any fans in the circuit. “Usually, it’s all sirens, flags and smoke and the atmosphere is buzzing – you get out of the car and have a different energy so I miss them, but I hope everyone is safe and happy at home.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more