Class of 1971 celebrates 50 year graduation anniversary and reflects on time at TCU

first_imgA fox’s tail: the story of TCU’s campus foxes What we’re reading: Chauvin found guilty in Floyd case, Xi to attend Biden’s climate change summit Twitter World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Ryann Booth Previous articleTCU rowing program strengthens after facing COVID-19 setbacksNext articleAbortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature Ryann Booth Linkedin Academics at TCU Ryann Boothhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/ryann-booth/ Posting with a passion: TCU student builds loyal following with Instagram blog TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history TCU rowing program strengthens after facing COVID-19 setbacks RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR ReddIt Ryann Boothhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/ryann-booth/ + posts Linkedin Twitter NewsCampus NewsGraduationTop StoriesClass of 1971 celebrates 50 year graduation anniversary and reflects on time at TCUBy Ryann Booth – May 4, 2021 550 ReddIt print Facebook Ryann Boothhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/ryann-booth/ Welcome TCU Class of 2025 Facebook Ryann Boothhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/ryann-booth/ Life in Fort Worthlast_img read more

US – RSF joins letter denouncing attempt to deport Mexican journalist

first_img News Reports June 3, 2021 Find out more The National Press Club, its Journalism Institute and other advocates for press freedom and immigration justice urge U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement to suspend efforts to deport Emilio Gutierrez, a winner of the club’s Press Freedom Award.Late on Friday, an immigration judge in El Paso, Texas, refused to stay the deportation of Gutierrez from the United States — where and his son fled after his investigative reporting led to threats against himself and his family. Gutierrez requested asylum in the United States; it took eight years for him to get a hearing, which took place last year.“Gutierrez fled his country because his reporting jeopardized him and his family and then faced years of bureaucratic indifference before now being threatened with removal,” said NPC President Jeff Ballou. “He deserves better from a country that has enshrined protections for the press in the First Amendment of its Constitution.”Gutierrez has been in the midst of an appeal process over his asylum case. On Thursday Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials summoned him for a meeting. They told his lawyer they wanted to deport him that day. This meeting took place exactly six weeks after he appeared at the National Press Club to accept a Freedom of the Press award, one of the club’s highest honors, on behalf of his country’s beleaguered press corps.At the NPC’s request, Gutierrez represented all of his Mexican colleagues, as an exemplar of their tenacity and courage as reporters are killed, kidnapped and forced into hiding in retaliation for their reporting on drug cartels and government corruption.He and his Mexican associates “find ourselves immersed in a great darkness,” Gutierrez said through a translator.“Our hope is that U.S. officials will provide a beacon in that darkness, in keeping with the country’s long tradition of advancing press freedom, by granting Gutierrez the asylum he has requested in the United States,” said Barbara Cochran, president of the board for the non-profit National Press Club Journalism Institute. “Sending him back to a country that is the most dangerous in the western hemisphere for journalists could amount to a death sentence.”The National Press Club, the National Press Club Journalism Institute and the undersigned organizations appeal to the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Justice to reconsider this deportation order. We also ask the Trump administration and all members of Congress to let the Department know that this case not only puts an individual reporter in danger, but also could have a chilling effect on truth-telling everywhere.Jeff Ballou, presidentThe National Press ClubBarbara Cochran, board presidentNPC Journalism InstituteSandy Johnson, president and COONational Press FoundationMargaux Ewen, Advocacy and Communications DirectorReporters Without Borders, North AmericaDan Shelley, executive directorRadio Television Digital News AssociationBruce Brown, executive directorReporters Committee for Freedom of the PressSuzanne Nossel, executive directorPEN AmericaJoshua Hatch, presidentOnline News AssociationJohn Donnelly, presidentMilitary Reporters and EditorsSarah Glover, presidentNational Association of Black JournalistsYvonne Leow, national presidentAsian American Journalists AssociationMelissa Lytle, presidentNational Press Photographers AssociationMark Hamrick, presidentSociety of American Business Editors and WritersAlberto B. Mendoza, executive directorNational Association of Hispanic JournalistsBeau Willimon, presidentWriters Guild of America East November 18, 2017 US – RSF joins letter denouncing attempt to deport Mexican journalist Receive email alerts Facebook’s Oversight Board is just a stopgap, regulation urgently needed, RSF says June 7, 2021 Find out more United StatesMexicoAmericas Condemning abusesProtecting journalists Judicial harassmentExiled media WhatsApp blocks accounts of at least seven Gaza Strip journalists RSF_en Reporters Without Borders (RSF) joined multiple press freedom groups in the following letter today denouncing attempts to deport Mexican journalist Emilio Gutierrez Soto from the United States. center_img News Organisation Follow the news on Americas to go further Help by sharing this information 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies United StatesMexicoAmericas Condemning abusesProtecting journalists Judicial harassmentExiled media News SAUL LOEB / AFP May 13, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

53 journalism groups urge again President Obama to stop excessive controls on public information

first_img United StatesAmericas June 7, 2021 Find out more News Help by sharing this information News August 20, 2015 – Updated on June 8, 2016 53 journalism groups urge again President Obama to stop excessive controls on public information Organisation The coalition, led by the Society of Professional Journalists, sent a letter to President Obama on August 10, 2015.This was the second letter the groups sent to the White House regarding government transparency. The first letter, sent July 8, 2014, and a follow-up letter sent Aug. 5, 2014, were met with a non-response response from the White House on Aug. 11, 2014. Facebook’s Oversight Board is just a stopgap, regulation urgently needed, RSF says April 28, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders joined a coalition of journalism and open government groups calling on President Barack Obama – yet again – to stop practices in federal agencies that prevent important information from getting to the public. Follow the news on United Statescenter_img News United StatesAmericas Receive email alerts JIM WATSON / AFP News WhatsApp blocks accounts of at least seven Gaza Strip journalists June 3, 2021 Find out more to go further NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say RSF_en last_img read more

Commission threatens one of the last independent newspapers with closure

first_img Reports Organisation November 27, 2020 Find out more News Zimbabwean court must free imprisoned journalist who is unwell RSF_en Zimbabwean journalist Hopewell Chin’ono denied bail Help by sharing this information ZimbabweAfrica September 1, 2020 Find out more The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africacenter_img Receive email alerts November 12, 2020 Find out more Reporters Without Borders voiced dismay today at learning that Tafataona Mahoso, the head of the Media and Information Commission (MIC), recently threatened the weekly Financial Gazette (FinGaz), one of Zimbabwe’s last independent news media, with withdrawal of its licence.The threat was made after FinGaz refused to publish a note retracting a 1 December article questioning the independence of the MIC, which was set up to monitor and regulate the Zimbabwean media and which has proved to be under the control of the government and the intelligence agencies.“The MIC has closed down four newspapers in three years, and clearly takes its order from the most senior members of the government,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Reduced to functioning as branch of the police, the MIC continues to impose the law of silence, especially when a newspaper dares to criticise it. As the African Union has apparently decided to try to loosen the vice-like grip on Zimbabwe’s press, it should not let one of the last independent publications be shut by Robert Mugabe’s and Mahoso’s thought tribunal.”FinGaz editor Sunsleey Chamunorwa and his deputy, Hama Saburi, were ordered to report to MIC headquarters during the week of 9-13 January. The MIC is currently carrying out its annual reexamination of newspaper licences and journalists’ accreditation, and Mahoso threatened to withdraw FinGaz’s licence.On 8 December, the MIC had ordered FinGaz to retract a report published the previous week that the MIC originally agreed to grant a licence to the owner of the now closed Daily News and then changed its mind under pressure from the Central Intelligence Organisation (CIO). In its letter to FinGaz, the MIC said it would choose the journalist who wrote the retraction. The newspaper refused to comply, and there was no mention of the incident in the following issues, published on 15 December and 5 January.These threats have come at time when information minister Tichaona Jokonya has announced that Zimbabwe’s draconian press laws are to be amended. The decision was taken after the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights (ACHPR), an African Union offshoot, issued a resolution on 5 December accusing Zimbabwe’s legislation of violating basic rights and civil liberties. News ZimbabweAfrica to go further January 19, 2006 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Commission threatens one of the last independent newspapers with closure News Follow the news on Zimbabwelast_img read more

Condemnation for Danish embassy car bombing in reprisal for Mohammed cartoons

first_img Pakistani journalist critical of the military wounded by gunfire June 5, 2008 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Condemnation for Danish embassy car bombing in reprisal for Mohammed cartoons Help by sharing this information Organisation April 21, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders condemns the suicide bombing of the Danish embassy in Islamabad on 2 June, which has been claimed by a branch of Al Qaeda in an online message purportedly posted by the terrorist organisation. The bombing, which killed eight people and wounded about 30 others, was a reprisal for the Mohammed cartoons published in Denmark, the message said.“It is understandable that many Muslims throughout the world took offence at these cartoons of the Prophet, but this does not in any way justify the use of violence, whether against journalists or diplomatic missions,” Reporters Without Borders said.Seven Pakistanis and a Danish citizen of Pakistani origin were killed by the suicide car bombing which, according to Danish investigators, was prepared well in advance. The car was able to get close to the embassy building because it had false diplomatic plates and it approached shortly after security guards had been replaced.The embassy had until recently been getting special protection, which was introduced after the Mohammed cartoons were reprinted in several Danish newspapers in February and death threats were made against one of the cartoonists.The claim of responsibility was made in an email message that was posted the day after the bombing on online forums often used by Islamist militants. In the message, whose authenticity has not been confirmed, the commander of Al Qaeda operations in Afghanistan, Mustafa Abu al-Yazid, said the bombing was “in retaliation against the infidel nation (Denmark) that published cartoons hostile to Allah’s messenger.”Denmark has been repeatedly criticised and threatened since the cartoons were first published on 30 September 2005 and their reproduction in media around the world has prompted much debate about respect for Islam and respect for press freedom. They have also triggered violence in many Muslim countries in the Middle East and Asia and journalists have been threatened and prosecuted for reprinting them or posting them online. Pakistani supreme court acquits main suspect in Daniel Pearl murder News Pakistani TV anchor censored after denouncing violence against journalists News PakistanAsia – Pacific center_img News Follow the news on Pakistan PakistanAsia – Pacific RSF_en Receive email alerts News January 28, 2021 Find out more June 2, 2021 Find out more to go furtherlast_img read more

Two journalists shot dead while travelling with provincial governor’s convoy

first_img Help by sharing this information to go further SomaliaAfrica Follow the news on Somalia RSF_en News News Two Radio Jowhar reporters were killed yesterday when gunmen ambushed the convoy of the governor of the central province Middle Shabelle, in which they were travelling, Reporters Without Borders has learned from its local partner organisation, the National Union of Somali Journalists (NUSOJ).“Two journalists have once again fallen victim to the extreme volatility of Somalia’s security situation,” the press freedom organisation said. “Journalists are both unwanted witnesses and easy targets for gunmen. But we refuse to accept the inevitability of these recurring tragedies. The transitional federal government must get together with Somali’s journalists and consider adopting special protective measures for the press.”A delegation led by governor Mohammed Omar Deele set off yesterday from the provincial capital of Jowhar for the locality of Addale to mediate between rival clans that have clashed over a piece of disputed land in the past few days leaving a toll of at least 16 dead.The two reporters with privately-owned Radio Jowhar, Abshir Ali Gabra and Ahmed Hassan, were travelling in the first vehicle. Gabra was also a correspondent of privately-owned Radio Quran Kariim, while Hassan was also a correspondent of the Puntland-based Somalia Broadcasting Corporation (SBC).They were killed instantly when the convoy came under fire from a group of unidentified gunmen at about 6 pm as it entered the disputed territory. Six of the governor’s bodyguards were also killed in the ensuing shootout.“The tragic deaths of our two colleagues bring the number of journalists killed in Somalia since the start of the year to four,” NUSOJ secretary-general Omar Faruk Osman told Reporters Without Borders. “We are very worried that Somalia could become a smaller version of Iraq, with one journalist after another being killed with complete impunity.”Osman said Gabra was a member of the NUSOJ supreme council, which functions as a sort of “parliament” for the organisation. SomaliaAfrica Receive email alerts RSF and NUSOJ call for release of a journalist held in Somalia’s Puntland regioncenter_img News February 24, 2021 Find out more News May 16, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Two journalists shot dead while travelling with provincial governor’s convoy Organisation March 2, 2021 Find out more Radio reporter gunned on city street in central Somalia RSF requests urgent adoption of moratorium on arrests of journalists January 8, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

American host cuts off Iranian press agency ISNA

first_img Receive email alerts IranMiddle East – North Africa June 9, 2021 Find out more February 25, 2021 Find out more After Hengameh Shahidi’s pardon, RSF asks Supreme Leader to free all imprisoned journalists News Call for Iranian New Year pardons for Iran’s 21 imprisoned journalists Reporters Without Borders said it suspected a political motive after US web host The Planet terminated its contract with the Iranian Student’s News Agency (ISNA) on 14 January 2005. The worldwide press freedom organisation has written to the US company seeking an explanation for its unilateral decision. News IranMiddle East – North Africa Follow the news on Iran Iran: Press freedom violations recounted in real time January 2020 News News Organisation RSF_en Help by sharing this information March 18, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders said it suspected a political motive after US web host The Planet terminated its contract with the Iranian Student’s News Agency (ISNA) on 14 January 2005.The worldwide press freedom organisation has written to the US company seeking an explanation for its unilateral decision.It pointed out that a host cannot interrupt its client’s service unless it has evidently broken a clause in the contract or if the contract has expired. Even in the event of a contractual dispute, a technical provider must give reasons for its decision. It does not have the competence to decide whether or not an online publication should be banned. This is the province of a judge, it said in the letter.Iranian Internet-users already suffer relentless government censorship, so it is all the more important for American host companies to show their respect for free expression, it added.The ISNA is an official press agency that nevertheless provides an important source of information, particularly for foreign organisations and media, on the arrests of journalists and political dissidents in Iran, it said. The agency regularly relays information from human rights organisations, even though it does not give its sources.In the email notifying ISNA that it was terminating the contract, The Planet said its decision was non negotiable and gave the agency 48 hours to find a new provider. Contacted by phone by Reporters Without Borders, The Planet refused to comment.The deputy technical director of ISNA described the host’s action as a “violation of international law”. The agency confirmed that it had changed its host following the notification from The Planet. to go further January 25, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 American host cuts off Iranian press agency ISNA last_img read more

This is not a container, it’s a prison

first_img Related documents rsf2014roundup.pdfPDF – 6.85 MB Reporters Without Borders and its advertising agency BETC are back in the public eye again at this troubled time for freedom of information, with journalists being murdered, jailed or censored.Coinciding with the release of its 2014 round-up of abuses against journalists, Reporters Without Borders is launching a campaign to mobilise support for media freedom and independence and to appeal to public generosity.BETC has produced a film based on a true story that shows a shipping container. It is a rather special container because, instead of transporting merchandize, it has been used as a prison cell for a journalist in the Eritrean desert for the past 12 years.Directed by One More, the film will be premiered today in Paris as part of a special event on the Champ de Mars (Place Jacques-Rueff), where Reporters Without Borders has installed a container in front of the Eiffel Tower. RSF_en Campaigns December 16, 2014 – Updated on March 4, 2016 This is not a container, it’s a prison Organisation Help by sharing this informationlast_img read more

Still no word of opposition website editor abducted a week ago, colleagues protest

first_imgNews “We are very concerned about this journalist, who is well known for criticising the government,” Reporters Without Borders said. “The authorities are pursuing their campaign of intimidation and repression against the Yemeni media.” Follow the news on Yemen Organisation YemenMiddle East – North Africa September 25, 2009 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Still no word of opposition website editor abducted a week ago, colleagues protest News February 26, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts YemenMiddle East – North Africa RSF_en Journalists demonstrated yesterday outside the presidential palace in Sanaa in protest against Maqalih’s abduction. Newscenter_img Help by sharing this information February 11, 2021 Find out more to go further United Nations: press freedom situation “deeply worrying” in Yemen, according to RSF The week before his abduction, Maqalih posted an article on the Al Eshteraki website condemning a Yemeni military airstrike on fleeing civilians in the northern Sa’ada region, where fierce fighting is taking place between government forces and Zaydi separatist rebels. The toll from the airstrike was put at 87 civilians killed and more than 100 others wounded. News Local human rights groups have accused the Yemeni authorities of responsibility for Maqalih’s abduction. The government has been carrying out a major military operation in the north of the country for the past month in a bid to suppress the rebellion. A week has gone by without news of Muhammad Al Maqalih, the editor of the opposition Socialist Party’s news website, Al Eshteraki, who was kidnapped by five masked gunmen while returning to his home in Sanaa on the evening of 18 September. Maqalih is an outspoken critic of President Ali Abdullah Saleh’s government. Fixer for foreign reporters held in Aden for past five months Yemeni journalist killed, nine wounded in Aden airport explosions January 6, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Radio reporter’s murder brings total number of journalists killed since 2003 to 88

first_img Organisation RSF_en Help by sharing this information Three jailed reporters charged with “undermining national security” News to go further RSF’s 2020 Round-up: 50 journalists killed, two-thirds in countries “at peace” December 28, 2020 Find out more Iraq : Wave of arrests of journalists covering protests in Iraqi Kurdistan News Reporters Without Borders today condemned the murder of Koussai Kahdban, an Iraqi journalist with local radio station Al-Bilad, who was shot by gunmen on 22 April in Baghdad. His death brought the number of journalists and media assistants killed in Iraq since the start of the war in March 2003 to 88, of whom 12 have been killed since the beginning of 2006. “This horrible deed once again serves to remind us that Iraq is the world’s most dangerous country for journalists,” the press freedom organisation said. Reporters Without Borders today condemned the murder of Koussai Kahdban, an Iraqi journalist with local radio station Al-Bilad, who was shot by gunmen on 22 April in Baghdad. His death brought the number of journalists and media assistants killed in Iraq since the start of the war in March 2003 to 88, of whom 12 have been killed since the beginning of 2006.“This horrible deed once again serves to remind us that Iraq is the world’s most dangerous country for journalists,” the press freedom organisation said. “Journalists are also the target of abductions. Reem Zeid, Marwan Khazaal and Salah Jali al-Gharrawi are all still being held hostage. We call on the new prime minister, Jawad Al-Maliki, to do every necessary to ensure that journalists get better protection and that their murderers are found and punished.”Reporters Without Borders added: “We share the grief of Koussai Kahdban’s family and employers and we extend our full sympathy to them.”A total of 40 journalists and media assistants have been kidnapped since the start of the war. Five of them (four Iraqis and Enzo Baldoni of Italy) were killed by their abductors. Twenty-six of these kidnappings took place in or near Baghdad. Follow the news on Iraq IraqMiddle East – North Africa Receive email alerts News February 15, 2021 Find out more April 24, 2006 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Radio reporter’s murder brings total number of journalists killed since 2003 to 88 News IraqMiddle East – North Africa December 16, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more