Scholes claims Man United will never win the Premier League with want-away star

first_imgHowever, he has failed to convince fans and pundits alike with his performances – with former Red Devils defender Rio Ferdinand calling him ‘a dream to defend against’.Regardless, the Belgium international scored 27 goals in his first season for the club and has also admitted he ‘hopes’ to play in Serie A.However, United legend Scholes believes the 25-year-old is actually hindering his former club’s pursuit of a first Premier League title since 2013.Speaking exclusively to ESPN, he said: “I’m just not sure you are ever going to win the league with a goal scorer like him. I don’t think his play outside of the box is good enough. “I’m not sure if he works hard enough but he’s still a young man who has done well and scored a lot of goals.“He’s quick and strong, but Lukaku is one of many United players who look like they’re short of confidence.“I don’t think he realises how good he can be, but he needs help because who else can play centre-forward at United now?” 2 Paul Scholes has sensationally claimed Manchester United will struggle to EVER win the Premier League title as long as Romelu Lukaku is up front.The Belgium international arrived at Old Trafford for a whopping £75million from Everton last season. Lukaku will never win the Premier League title with United, according to Scholes The striker has struggled to convince fans and pundits alike since his £75million move 2last_img read more

PM wraps cabinet retreat with hint of pot pardons to come –

first_imgLONDON, Ont. – Canadians convicted of simple marijuana possession will have to wait until recreational pot is legalized later this year before learning if they’ll be pardoned for something that will no longer be a crime.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau ruled out Friday declaring an amnesty before the new law goes into effect in July.“We recognize that anyone who is currently purchasing marijuana is participating in illegal activity that is funding criminal organizations and street gangs,” he told a news conference wrapping up a two-day cabinet retreat.“And therefore we do not want to encourage in any way people to engage in that behaviour until the law is changed.”Trudeau hinted that an amnesty could be declared once the law is enacted, although he did not specifically commit to one.“Once the law is changed, we will, of course, reflect on fairness in a way that is responsible moving forward. I think certainly we know that the current legislation is hurting Canadians and criminalizing Canadians who perhaps shouldn’t be,” he said.“But that is an engagement we will take once we have a legalized and controlled regime in place, not before.”Earlier Friday, Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale said his department is analyzing all the legal ramifications of pardoning the thousands of Canadians who’ve been convicted of possessing small amounts of marijuana — acquiring criminal records that can hurt their career prospects or prevent them from crossing the border.Goodale said no decision has yet been made.The legalization of recreational marijuana is one of the biggest ticket items on the Trudeau government’s agenda for 2018 as the ruling Liberals tick off as many of their 2015 election campaign promises as possible in preparation for the next election in 2019.Government insiders have said the year will be focused primarily on “relentless implementation” of the Liberals’ central promise to invest in measures to grow the economy, create jobs and bolster the lot of middle-class Canadians.“We laid out an ambitious plan for growth during the 2015 election campaign and that plan for real change for all Canadians is working,” Trudeau asserted Friday, noting that unemployment is at its lowest level since 1976 and that Canada last year boasted the best economic growth among G7 industrialized countries.The Liberals are hoping that Canadians’ satisfaction with the state of the economy will trump criticism about other less favourable aspects of their record — particularly on the ethics front.Just before Christmas, the federal ethics watchdog ruled that Trudeau violated four different sections of the Conflict of Interest Act when he and his family took vacations on the private Bahamian Island owned by the Aga Khan, billionaire philanthropist and spiritual leader of the world’s Ismaili Muslims.Opposition parties, intent on keeping the ethics lapses front and centre in the new year, are calling for stricter rules and serious penalties for violating them.On that score, Trudeau said Friday that he’s willing to consider beefing up the conflict of interest legislation.“I’m always happy to take recommendations from experts, from various people like the outgoing commissioner or the incoming commissioner on how we can ensure that our institutions and the folks who protect and uphold our institutions continue to be doing the best things the best way for Canadians,” he said.Conveniently, outgoing ethics commissioner Mary Dawson has said she believes public shaming is sufficient penalty for politicians who break ethics rules.While the Liberals want to focus on the economy and the opposition parties on ethics, neither issue has generated much interest so far in Trudeau’s so-called cross-country “listening tour” to hear what Canadians outside the Ottawa bubble think.But Trudeau said the fact he got few questions during the first three town halls this week about his government’s economic agenda is actually a positive sign.“If there weren’t as many questions as there were in previous town halls I’ve done on the economy, I think it can be taken as a sign that we are on the right track.”last_img read more

Attack of Muslim man appears to have been motivated by hate police

first_imgTORONTO – An attack in southern Ontario that sent a Muslim man to hospital appears to have been motivated by hate, police said Wednesday, as his family tried to come to grips with the incident.Peel regional police said they were called to investigate a fight in Mississauga, Ont., at about 9 p.m. on Sunday, and discovered the man being beaten by two people.Ahmed Abu Marzouk said he got to the scene shortly after police arrived to find his brother Muhammed lying on the ground.“His wife was holding him … his face was all swollen,” Abu Marzouk said Wednesday.He said she told him the attackers continued to assault his brother after knocking him to the ground.“She said they wouldn’t stop kicking him while he was on the ground until the cop pulled the gun on them and told them to stop,” he said.Two men, aged 27 and 19, have been charged with assault in the incident.“The fight began as a result of a driving incident that occurred in the parking lot,” police said a statement.“During the assault, racially based comments were uttered at the victim, indicating the assault may have been a hate-motivated incident.”Sana Khwaja, who is helping organize a fundraising campaign for the man who was attacked, said he has undergone several surgeries since the incident.Abu Marzouk had been at a picnic with his family — including his two daughters, aged six and four — when he was backing up his car and narrowly avoided hitting two men, Khwaja said.When he got out of the car to see if everything was OK, Khwaja alleged the two men began to beat Abu Marzouk. She added that witnesses said the men allegedly shouted racist slurs at Abu Marzouk.“They swore at him. They called him names about his ethnicity,” Khwaja said. “His wife came out, and his brother also came to try to stop them from hurting him further.”Abu Marzouk has woken up and was able to speak to his parents, Khwaja said, noting that it could take several months for him to recover. She said his injuries include multiple fractures and a brain hemorrhage.“He’s just a typical Canadian,” she said. “He’s just having fun with his family…. No one expects this to happen to them, and it’s tragic.”Ahmed Abu Marzouk said his brother is breathing on his own but doctors found a clot on his brain during a scan on Wednesday.“They want to give him a blood thinner, but they’re afraid because he’s still bleeding after the surgery,” he said.He said his daughters and his brother’s daughters all witnessed the incident.“I think they’re trying to block it,” he said. “They don’t want to talk about it — keep pretending it never happened.”The Muslim and other communities in the Mississauga, Ont., area have been “helping us a lot morally,” he said.The incident has drawn the attention of various Muslim groups, including the National Council of Canadian Muslims.“We are extremely appalled by this horrific assault and our thoughts and prayers are with the victim, their family and the local Muslim community,” Ihsaan Gardee, executive director of the council, said in a statement.“Such hateful and cowardly acts are abhorrent to all Canadians.”Peel regional police Chief Jennifer Evans urged local residents on Wednesday to “stay vigilant” and report any hate-motivated crimes they see.“The Region of Peel is one of the most diverse and inclusive communities in Canada, and hateful behaviour will not be tolerated,” Evans said in a written statement.“I want to assure the public that all our officers are trained to recognize and investigate hate-motivated crime, and we take these incidents very seriously.”— with files from Peter Goffin and Peter Cameron.last_img read more