Ancelotti urges UEFA to introduce VAR

first_imgThe Italian manager wants the Video Assistant Referee (VAR) technology available at the Champions League this seasonThe Video Assistant Referee Technology (VAR) is being used in the top leagues in the world or will be introduced soon.It was also used during the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia with successful results.And Napoli manager Carlo Ancelotti has urged UEFA to introduce it as soon as possible in the Champions League.“I think they are already late in bringing it in,” Ancelotti told Radio Kiss Kiss as quoted by Football Italia.Sacchi explains Sarri, Conte, and Ancelotti Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Arrigo Sacchi talked about how Sarri has a tougher time at Juventus than Conte at Inter; while Ancelotti’s “blood is boiling” at Napoli.Arrigo Sacchi…“Now they say it’s an issue of referees without much experience dealing with VAR, but if you get to the Champions League Round of 16, the officials are going to be experienced and VAR could help them.”“There have been too many errors recently. If there’s an error in the league, you have time to make up for it, but in the Champions League you’re just out,” he added.“The system hasn’t started badly in Serie A, there were a few negative incidents, but at the end of the day it is still the referee who makes the decision.”“All VAR does is show the referee what he hasn’t been able to see live. The decision will always be subjective,” he commented.“I say that VAR ought to be used more.”last_img read more

Air India divestment More positives than negatives to a Maharajas selloff

first_imgAUTUMN OF THE PATRIARCH: The government should expedite Air India’s sale by increasing the higher FDI component for foreign buyers who can employ the right professional expertise and marketing know-how to turn around the beleaguered airline.Creative CommonsBad mergers create bad blood – in the skies and on the ground. When the government merged India’s two state-owned airlines in 2007, Air India and domestic carrier Indian Airlines, the combined entity would soon grow into a megalith symbolising all the shortcomings of India’s public sector.In just a generation, competition from the private sector, rising fuel costs as a percentage of operational expenditure, strikes by opposing factions of pilots, freebies and upgrades to politicians and bureaucrats, and huge discounting would move the Maharaja from monopolising air travel to being only India’s third largest airline with a 11.8 percent market share.But the literal bottomline here is: Air India has lost money almost every year since its merger despite the UPA II government infusing Rs 30,000 crore into Air India under a financial restructuring plan (FRP). Total equity infused in the airline thus far is Rs 22,280 crore. Banks currently have an exposure of about Rs 53,980 crore.A diverting fact is that state-owned Air India utilised government bailouts while launching price wars with other airlines as part of its survival requirements, leading to the logical conclusion that the government was helping subsidise monopolistic behaviour.Another FRP by the present BJP dispensation to infuse Rs 42,182 crore as additional equity over 22 years has been delayed as the airline grapples with the problem of handling over Rs 50,000 crore in debt, of which an estimated Rs 23,000 crore is by way of aircraft loan advances. It is a no-win situation exacerbated by the airline’s asset deterioration down the years and its inability to even control its operating losses since 2011.Last year, for the first time in about a decade, Air India managed to post Rs 105 crore in operating profit (net loss after tax in 2016 — Rs 3,836.77 crore) on the back of fresh capital infusion from the government and lower ATF prices. But was the intangible benefits of holding on to a 13 percent market share worth splattering more red ink on a battered balance-sheet? The government didn’t think so. Its decision to divest the national carrier spoke of the triumph of experience over, often unrealistic, hope.Dreams Un-linedThe national career was a symbol of public sector ingenuity and operational inventiveness down the decades till its much- ballyhooed merger with Indian Airlines. Then, the losses started piling up with fresh competition from the private sector on key sectors within India. Even Vijay Mallya’s doomed Kingfisher took valuable market share away from Air India. Middle East carriers like Emirates, Gulf Air and Qatar Airways gained top-of-the-mind recall for expatriate travellers to destinations like Dubai, Abu Dhabi, Riyadh, Jeddah and Muscat.For a government long in denial about the dismal picture which Air India presented, the benefits of disinvesting the airline in a single swoop are far more than taking a piecemeal approach as recommended by critics who suggest that it retain 51 percent in the asset-heavy airline. Air India owns prime land in cities like Mumbai, Chennai and Kolkata, the sale of which, disinvestment supporters expect will vault the airline out of troubled times. But this asset class, going by the airline’s own assessment, would yield only Rs 10,000 crore which is not a scratch on its huge debt burden. Raghavendra NThe Dreamliner aircraft and its entitled pilot crews have remained a thorn in the airline’s flesh to this day. Pilot strikes and mutinies since 2012 and largescale operational mismanagement took the airlines to a new low. The airline incurred operational losses of Rs 5,537 crore in 2012 (or Rs 15 crore every day). Subsequent years were not too different, though going by the government’s claims, Air India was actually paring down its losses fiscal after fiscal.Minister of State for Civil Aviation Jayant Sinha had exuded confidence about the airline’s performance since last year, and earlier this year, asserted that it would show operating profits of Rs 300 crore in 2016-17, and the government had no plans to privatise the airline – till the latter poured cold water over his enthusiasm by announcing that a disinvestment program to sell the airline and recover its losses would soon be underway.The Comptroller & Auditor General (CAG) made things stickier when it said that the airline had actually posted operating losses of Rs 321.40 crore in the April-June period of 2015-16, when the government had claimed a profit.But Air India said that its operational performance targets were in line with the turnaround plan. A spokesperson said that “considerable improvement” in on-time performance at 78.2 percent was achieved in 2015-16 as compared to 68.2 percent in 2011-12. The available evidence didn’t justify the airline’s claims.Taking the debt-free roadThe logical answer to Air India’s problems is privatisation — but politicians and bureaucrats, who misuse India’s flag carrier as much as its employees do –, would baulk at such a move. Air India has been surviving on the Rs 30,000-crore bailout package put together by UPA-II in 2012 to help its turnaround, as well as debt relief provided by public sector banks. It is estimated that even a well executed asset sale may not fully cover the airline’s liabilities, and taxpayers cannot escape footing part of the loss — either directly in case the government pays off the airline’s creditors, or indirectly if the public sector banks write off their loans to the airline.The three options on the table could be a full 100 percent selloff, a 74 percent stake sale or retaining a 49 percent share in the airline, as per a tentative note from the Department of Investment and Public Asset Management (DIPAM). Raghavendra NThe decision to form an Air India-specific Alternative Mechanism to take forward the disinvestment plan is timely. But this Mechanism should first shed clarity on how the eventual sale will be executed — whether the airline will be fully privatised or hived off asset-wise to interested bidders like IndiGo, which has expressed interest in buying out the carrier’s international operations and peak hour landing slots in airports like London and New York. These slots if sold should fetch the government at least Rs 3,000 crore.A sale of market slots in airports like Delhi and Mumbai would be attractive to foreign airlines to invest in India, though the government’s stakeholding and quantum of divestment will come under their scrutiny before entering the bidding fray. Experts have suggested that the value of the heritage Air India brand can’t be overlooked either, when even Kingfisher’s hostile lenders valued that brand at Rs 160 crore.If both foreign and prospective domestic buyers like Indigo, are allowed to bid freely for the airline, more value could be realised from a sale. There have been suggestions to add more value to the airline’s assets by hiving off non-core assets with high profit potential into a shell company and demerger and strategic disinvestment of profit-making subsidiaries. This make sense only if the government considers making key changes in its FDI policy to allow foreign investors to buy a more substantial stake in Air India. If it is possible to invest 74 percent FDI in telecom, then why not in aviation?The highly rated Tata-Air Asia Berhad JV which saw Air Asia grabbing a foothold in the huge Indian market, has still not fulfilled its initial promise. Going by the record, almost all airlines that have lost money have only themselves to blame. Their painpoints include inefficient operations, aggressive expansion without consolidation, balance-sheets which are leveraged unduly high, improper route planning and wrong pricing of tickets. These factors have contributed more to the downfall of many an airline meeting its Waterloo in the Indian aviation market, rather than the market itself — which is growing and has many milestones ahead of it. Carriers like IndiGo have excelled in the same market. Stabilising Air India will be an important step ahead for Indian aviation. For a start, in the event of a successful sale, the government and its ministries must start seeing Air India as a revenue source and not a revenue generator.last_img read more

Bar to entering Dhaka before BNP rally

first_imgProthom Alo file photo The commuters of Narayanganj district are facing immense sufferings as a very few public transports were reportedly leaving the district for the capital since Sunday morning ahead of the BNP’s rally at Suhrawardy Udyan, reports UNB.Hundreds of commuters, mostly students and working people, were seen waiting for public transports at several bus stoppages to go to the capital city.Only the buses of Shital Paribahan were plying the roads while all the buses of other Dhaka-bound transport organisations, including Bandhan Paribahan and Utsab Paribahan, stayed off the streets since the morning, alleged many commuters.M Zakir Hossain Majumder, a private organisation employee, said he fortunately got into a bus of Shital Paribahan after competing with a good number of commuters.Apart from Narayanganj, few public transports left Savar for Dhaka since the morning amid the transport owners’ association’s allegation that they were asked to ‘keep all their transports’ off the streets.In Gazipur, commuters got stuck at several bus stoppages due to the scarcity of public transports.Many of the commuters were seen walking to reach their destinations, reports our Gazipur correspondent.Meanwhile, police arrested 48 leaders and activists of district and upazilas’ unit of BNP and its associate bodies, alleged the party leaders.Thousands of city dwellers are also reportedly facing sufferings as the presence of public transports on the roads has been very thin since the morning.last_img read more

Life on exoplanets may give off a fluorescent glow

first_img Powered by Scientists at Cornell University say that life-bearing exoplanets may be detectable by their soft glow. Based on laboratory studies, the team led by Jack O’Malley-James at Cornell’s Carl Sagan Institute believes that a mechanism that protects organisms from hard ultraviolet radiation could make worlds beyond the solar system radiate a soft, detectable light.Anyone who has watched fireflies flitting about in the night sky is familiar with the idea of organisms producing light. Not only can some insects light up, but so can fish, squid, bacteria and many others, for a variety reasons that include attracting mates, camouflage, decoying prey, and marking territory. But there is another type of luminescence called “photoprotective biofluorescence,” which is a protective mechanism found in some species of undersea corals that live at a shallow enough depth for ultraviolet radiation from the Sun to penetrate. Normally, such radiation would be absorbed by the tissues, resulting in a nasty and possibly fatal case of marine sunburn, but these polyps have a trick up their non-existent sleeves.What happens is that biofluorescent proteins in the coral’s tissues absorb the UV radiation, exciting an electron and raising it to an unstable energy state. As the electron returns to its stable state it re-emits radiation in the visible band of the light spectrum. The result is that the UV is rendered harmless and the animal fluoresces. What occurred to the Cornell teams was that this mechanism could be handy to any extraterrestrial life that happened to evolve in a particularly nasty environment, such as in the habitable zone of M-type stars, where a large number of exoplanets have been found. M-type stars tend to emit ultraviolet flares, which is bad news for any organisms on planets orbiting them, but if they used biofluorescence to protect themselves, not only would this give them a fighting chance, it would also produce a biosignature that could be detected by telescopes when the flare hits the planet, causing it to temporarily fluoresce.To test this hypothesis, the team studied the spectral emissions of common fluorescent corals and used this to produce model spectra and colors that could be found on exoplanets orbiting M-type stars. They concluded that the strength of this glow could be enough to be detected by telescopes currently under development. “These biotic kinds of exoplanets are very good targets in our search for exoplanets, and these luminescent wonders are among our best bets for finding life on exoplanets,” says O’Malley-James.The research was published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.Source: Cornell University We recommend Google Analytics settings Privacy policy I consent to the use of Google Analytics and related cookies across the TrendMD network (widget, website, blog). Learn more Yes Nolast_img read more

Air Transat ranks 1 airline on Forbes list Transat releases Product Showcase

first_img Share Wednesday, January 30, 2019 Posted by Travelweek Group MONTREAL — Air Transat has placed first among airlines in Forbes magazine’s annual list of Canada’s Best Employers.The company gained 18 positions in the overall ranking, rising from 69th in 2018 to 51st in 2019. Transat also ranked 13th in Quebec.“It’s a great honour to lead Canada’s airlines and be among the top 15 best employers in Quebec,” said Christophe Hennebelle, Tranat’s Vice-President, Human Resources and Corporate Affairs. “Whether it’s through our inspiring brand image that embodies the joy of vacations or our leadership in sustainable development, Transat provides a stimulating and diverse workplace that is a source of pride for our employees. They’re our best ambassadors and we thank them for contributing so much to the company’s reputation.”Forbes establishes its ranking of the country’s top employers based on a survey of 8,000 Canadians who work for some 1,500 private and public companies with more than 500 employees. Answers are given anonymously and without the involvement of employers.More news:  GLP Worldwide introduces first-ever Wellness programsIn other news, Transat has released the dates for its 2019 Product Showcase trade shows.The schedule is as follows:ONTARIO & NOVA SCOTIA:Toronto, ON – June 3London, ON – June 4Hamilton, ON – June 5Halifax, NS – June 6QUEBEC:North Montreal, Laval, QC – June 10South Montreal, Longueuil, QC – June 11Quebec City, QC – June 12WESTERN CANADA:Winnipeg, MB – June 17Calgary, AB – June 18Edmonton, AB – June 19Vancouver, BC – June 20A formal invite will be released in April.center_img Tags: Air Transat, Canada’s Best Employers, Forbes, Product Showcase Air Transat ranks #1 airline on Forbes list; Transat releases Product Showcase dates << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more

Cruise ships target of Venice protest after canal crash

first_imgTags: Venice Monday, June 10, 2019 << Previous PostNext Post >> Share By: The Associated Press Cruise ships target of Venice protest after canal crash VENICE, Italy — Thousands of people have marched in Venice to demand that cruise ships be kept out of the Italian city’s lagoon.The protest Saturday was galvanized by a crash six days earlier involving a cruise ship that struck a much smaller river boat in Venice’s Giudecca Canal. The crash injured five people.Some marchers carried banners that read “Ships out of the lagoon.” Others took to the Venetian Lagoon itself in rowboats and other small vessels to push a yearslong campaign to end cruise ship port calls.Environmentalists have complained huge cruise liners wear down the city’s fragile foundations in the Adriatic Sea and dredge up the lagoon’s muddy bottom.Venice’s mayor wants cruise ships rerouted from the heart of the lagoon. The ships disembark thousands of day-trippers.last_img read more