Man stabbed during fight at Oceanside Convenience store

first_img OCEANSIDE (KUSI) – A fight between two men at a North County convenience store escalated Friday into a stabbing that left one of them hospitalized and the other under arrest, police said.The 9:30 a.m. fracas happened at the ampm [sic] minimart in the 1500 block of Melrose Drive, Oceanside police Lt. Kedrick Sadler said.Following the stabbing, the assailant allegedly fled on foot; medics took the victim to a trauma center, where he was admitted in stable condition with wounds to his upper body, according to Sadler.Officers searched the area with help from a sheriff’s patrol helicopter, eventually finding the suspect at a business in the 700 block of North Avenue in Vista, several blocks south from the assault.The alleged assailant, whose name was not immediately available, was taken into custody without incident about 11:15 a.m., the lieutenant said.It was unclear what sparked the violence. January 4, 2019 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Posted: January 4, 2019 KUSI Newsroom KUSI Newsroom, Man stabbed during fight at Oceanside Convenience storelast_img read more

Mamata remembers brave soldiers hails Tashkent Agreement

first_imgKolkata: West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee Thursday remembered the soldiers who laid down their lives during the India-Pakistan war in 1965, following which the Tashkent Agreement was signed on this day. “On this day in 1966, Tashkent Agreement was signed by Lal Bahadur Shastri and Ayub Khan, ending the war between Pakistan and India. Homage to all the soldiers who laid down their lives for the country. Jai Hind,” Banerjee tweeted. The 1965 armed conflict between India and Pakistan was formally brought to an end by signing this agreement at Tashkent on January 10, 1966.last_img

SolidState Drives Versus HardDisk Drives in Laptops

first_img The idea of using flash-based storage in a notebook isn’t new. Nevertheless, the high cost of flash has prevented it from replacing hard-disk drives on mainstream notebook PCs, despite some advantages in power consumption, shock resistance, and speed–until now.Photograph: Robert CardinAs prices continue to drop, flash-based solid-state drives (SSDs) have become viable options for handling your notebook’s primary storage requirements. Moreover, today’s roomiest SSDs have 32GB of memory, enough to do more than satisfy basic storage needs–making them competitive with 1.8-inch hard-disk drives, which range in capacity from 30GB to 80GB. These SSDs, available from companies like Samsung and SanDisk, are lightweight (the SanDisk UATA 5000, for example, weighs 59 grams–just over 2 ounces) and can be found in portables from Dell, Fujitsu, and Toshiba.Are they worth the extra dollars? In spite of price drops, SSDs cost $400 to $500 more than ordinary hard drives of the same capacity. To justify the price difference, SSD notebooks must demonstrate significant performance benefits over notebooks equipped with standard hard drives. To find out whether they do, we tested three pairs of ultraportable notebooks from Fujitsu and Dell.The SSD ChallengePhotograph: Rob CardinThe two test models in each pair of laptops were identically configured, except that one had an SSD, and the other a typical 1.8-inch 4200-rpm hard drive. Two of the notebooks–Dell’s 6.25-pound ATG D620 ($3015 with SSD, $2815 with a 80GB hard-disk drive) and Fujitsu’s 2.5-pound LifeBook P1610 ($2578 with SSD, $2029 with a 30GB hard-disk drive)– ran Windows XP Professional. The third notebook, another LifeBook P1610 ($2548 with SSD, $1999 with a 30GB hard-disk drive) ran Windows Vista Business.No Clear WinnerResults were mixed: In several cases, our tests bore out the advantages of SSD, in other cases, the hard-disk-based models led the way.Photograph: Rob CardinOur benchmark suite for testing system performance, WorldBench 6, Beta 2, showed no definite pattern in overall results between SSD systems and hard-disk-drive systems. For example, the two Dell ATG D620 models, packed with a 2.0-GHz Core 2 Duo T7200 CPU and 1GB of memory, each earned a mark of 76 on WorldBench 6. In contrast, the two Fujitsu LifeBook P1610 units, configured with a 1.2-GHz Core Solo U1400, 1GB of memory, and Windows XP Professional, differed in performance: The SSD version received a score of 42, while the hard-drive version received a 39.Interestingly, the performance difference was even more pronounced in the pair of Fujitsu P1610 models running Windows Vista Business. Here, the SSD version of the notebook finished with a 36 on our WorldBench 6 beta tests, while the hard-drive version posted only a 30. The Vista-based Fujitsu system with the SSD did especially well on our Adobe Photoshop CS2 image manipulation test, besting the hard-drive version by 36 percent, and on our Nero 7 Ultra Edition disk burning test, where it outperformed its counterpart by 76 percent.The SSDs achieved superior performance in all three pairings on only two types of applications: drive-intensive tests like our Nero 7 Ultra Edition disc burning, and WinZip 10.0 file compression tests. The SSD versions of the two Fujitsus also earned higher marks than their hard-disk doppelgangers on our Photoshop CS2 test, but on that test the hard-disk Dell outran the SSD Dell by 10 percent.SSDs Rock on Hard-Drive-Intensive TasksWe did see decisive performance wins by the SSD models on the file read and write tests that we use for our hard-drive testing. (The read and write tests consist of reading and writing folders of files, and searching for files on a drive.) On these tests, the SSD models bested their hard-drive counterparts in 11 out of 12 instances. Occasionally, the scores were close: On our Windows file search of 6.1GB of data, for example, the SDD Fujitsu Vista Business system notebook finished the test in 86 seconds, while its hard-drive-based twin finished the test in 100 seconds. Still, in most cases, the SSD models were dramatically faster. The most extreme example: The XP Pro Fujitsu finished our large-file reading and writing test in 199 seconds, far ahead of the hard drive-equipped model, which finished the test in 533 seconds.SSDs Deliver Only Slight Battery Life EdgeThough industry experts routinely boast that flash memory consumes less power than hard drives do, our battery tests found little real-world difference between the two drive types on this measure.The SSD version of the Dell ATG D620 lasted 5 hours, 40 minutes in our test, just 3 minutes longer than the hard-disk-equipped version lasted. The SSD Fujitsu P1610 with XP held out for 3 hours, 11 minutes–7 minutes longer than its hard-drive counterpart. And the SSD Fujitsu P1610 running Vista Business bested the hard-drive version by 9 minutes (2 hours, 26 minutes versus 2 hours, 17 minutes). The advantage in battery life boost would almost certainly increase for the SSD models if they were matched against hard-drive laptops with drives larger than the 4200-rpm components we used. The faster a disk spins, the more power is required to spin it.SSD’s Other BenefitsNumbers don’t tell the whole story about solid-state drives. SSDs also tend to be more rugged than a standard hard drive because the NAND flash memory they use lacks the moving parts found in a hard drive. Drop your notebook, and the data on your SSD will be safe–even if the notebook’s screen doesn’t survive unscathed. Also, unlike hard-disk drives, SSDs don’t generate heat and don’t produce a lot of electromagnetic interference.ConclusionsManufacturers first incorporated SSDs into ultraportable notebooks designed for people working in healthcare, insurance, and similar fields. But as prices drop and storage capacities increase, you can expect manufacturers to begin promoting SSD notebooks to a broader range of users.Indeed, the movement toward the mainstream has already begun. This summer, Dell introduced SSD into the company’s Latitude D630, D830, and D430 business notebooks, which target power business users and travelers. Choosing the SSD option to replace the standard 80GB 5400-rpm hard drive on any of these units adds $540 to its overall price. Toshiba is expected to begin introducing SSDs into select notebooks later this year, too.The Bottom LineUltimately, with an SSD in your notebook, you’ll see somewhat better system responsiveness, and a positive change in the way the system handles drive-intensive tasks such as reading data from and writing data to the drive, coming out of standby mode, and booting up from scratch. If you’re a mobile worker who tends to bump your laptop around a little and who would benefit from performance boosts in those areas, the extra cost of having “SSD inside” might just be worth it.Test Report: Solid-State Drives vs. Hard-Disk Drives–Which Are Faster?The performance boost from SSD varies from notebook to notebook, but using SSD is clearly beneficial for hard-drive-intensive tasks. Enroll Now for Free This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. 6 min read Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now Brought to you by PCWorld July 13, 2007last_img read more

Life on exoplanets may give off a fluorescent glow

first_img Powered by Scientists at Cornell University say that life-bearing exoplanets may be detectable by their soft glow. Based on laboratory studies, the team led by Jack O’Malley-James at Cornell’s Carl Sagan Institute believes that a mechanism that protects organisms from hard ultraviolet radiation could make worlds beyond the solar system radiate a soft, detectable light.Anyone who has watched fireflies flitting about in the night sky is familiar with the idea of organisms producing light. Not only can some insects light up, but so can fish, squid, bacteria and many others, for a variety reasons that include attracting mates, camouflage, decoying prey, and marking territory. But there is another type of luminescence called “photoprotective biofluorescence,” which is a protective mechanism found in some species of undersea corals that live at a shallow enough depth for ultraviolet radiation from the Sun to penetrate. Normally, such radiation would be absorbed by the tissues, resulting in a nasty and possibly fatal case of marine sunburn, but these polyps have a trick up their non-existent sleeves.What happens is that biofluorescent proteins in the coral’s tissues absorb the UV radiation, exciting an electron and raising it to an unstable energy state. As the electron returns to its stable state it re-emits radiation in the visible band of the light spectrum. The result is that the UV is rendered harmless and the animal fluoresces. What occurred to the Cornell teams was that this mechanism could be handy to any extraterrestrial life that happened to evolve in a particularly nasty environment, such as in the habitable zone of M-type stars, where a large number of exoplanets have been found. M-type stars tend to emit ultraviolet flares, which is bad news for any organisms on planets orbiting them, but if they used biofluorescence to protect themselves, not only would this give them a fighting chance, it would also produce a biosignature that could be detected by telescopes when the flare hits the planet, causing it to temporarily fluoresce.To test this hypothesis, the team studied the spectral emissions of common fluorescent corals and used this to produce model spectra and colors that could be found on exoplanets orbiting M-type stars. They concluded that the strength of this glow could be enough to be detected by telescopes currently under development. “These biotic kinds of exoplanets are very good targets in our search for exoplanets, and these luminescent wonders are among our best bets for finding life on exoplanets,” says O’Malley-James.The research was published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.Source: Cornell University We recommend Google Analytics settings Privacy policy I consent to the use of Google Analytics and related cookies across the TrendMD network (widget, website, blog). Learn more Yes Nolast_img read more

Progressive Web AMPs Combining Progressive Wep Apps and AMP

first_imgModern day web development is getting harder. Users are looking for relentless, responsive and reliable browsing. They want faster results and richer experiences. In addition to this, Modern apps need to be designed so as to support a large number of ecosystems from mobile web, desktop web, Native ioS, Native Android, Instant articles etc. Every new technology which launches has its own USP. The need for today is combining the features of the various popular mobile tech in the market and reaping their benefits as a combination. Acknowledging the standalones In a study by google it was found that “53% of mobile site visits are abandoned if pages take longer than 3 seconds to load.” This calls for making page loads faster and effortless. A cure for this illness is in the form of AMP or Accelerated Mobile Pages, the brainwork of Google and Twitter. They are blazingly fast web pages purely meant for readability and speed. Essentially they are HTML, most of CSS, but no JavaScript. So heavy duty things such as images are not loaded until they are scrolled into view. In AMPs, links are pre-rendered before you click on them. This is made possible using the AMP caching infrastructure. It automatically caches and calls on the content to be displayed atop the AMP and that is why it feels instant. Because the developers almost never write JavaScript, it leads to a cheap, yet fairly interactive deployment model. However, AMPs are useful for a narrow range of content. They have limited functionality. Users, on the other hand, are also looking for reliability and engagement. This called for the development of what is known as Progressive web apps. Proposed by Google in 2015, PWAs combine the best of mobile and web applications to offer users an enriching experience. Think of Progressive web apps as a website that acts and feels like a complete app. Once the user starts exploring the app within the browser, it progressively becomes smarter, faster and makes user experience richer.  Application Shell Architecture and Service Workers are two core drivers that enable PWA to offer speed and functionality. Key benefits that PWA offers over traditional mobile sites include push notifications, highly responsive UI, all types of hardware access which includes access to camera & microphones, and low data usage to name a few. The concoction: PWA + AMP AMPs are fast and easy to deploy. PWAs are engaging and reliable. AMPs are effortless, more retentive and instant. PWAs supports dynamic content, provides push notifications and web manifests. AMPs work on user acquisition. PWAs enhance user experiences. They seemingly work perfectly well on different levels. But users want to Start quick and Stay quick. They want the content they view to make the first hop blazingly fast, but then provide richer pages by amazing reliability and engagement. This called for combining the features of both into one and this was how Progressive web AMPs was born. PWAMP, as the developers call it, combines the capabilities of native app ecosystem with the reach of the mobile Web. Let us look at how exactly it functions and does the needful. The Best of Both Worlds: Reaping benefits of both AMPs fall back when you have dynamic content. Lack of JavaScript means dynamic functionality such as Payments, or push notifications are unavailable. PWA, on the other hand, can never be as fast as an AMP on the first click. Progressive Web AMPs combines the best features of both by making the first click super fast and then rendering subsequent PWA pages/content. So AMP opens a webpage in the blink of an eye with zero time lag and then the subsequent swift transition to PWA leads to beautiful results with dynamic functionalities. So it starts fast and builds up as users browse further. Now, this merger is made possible using three different ways. AMP as PWA: AMP pages in combination with PWA features This involves enabling PWA features in AMP pages. The user clicks on the link, it boots up fast and you see an AMP page which loads from the AMP cache. On clicking subsequent links, the user moves away from AMP cache to the site’s domain(origin). The website continues using the AMP library, but because it is supported on origin now, service workers become active, making it possible to prompt users (by web manifests) to install a PWA version of their website for a progressive experience. AMP to PWA: AMP pages utilized for a smooth transition to PWA features In PWAs the service workers and app shells kick in only after the second step. Hence AMPs can be a perfect entry point for your apps whereas the user discovers content at fast rates with AMP pages, the service worker of the PWA installs in the background and the user is instantly upgraded to PWA in subsequent clicks which can add push notifications, add reminders, web manifests etc. So basically the next click is also going to be instant. AMP in PWA: AMP as a data source for PWA AMPs are easy and safe to embed. As they are self-contained units, they are easily embeddable in websites. Hence they can be utilized as a data source for PWAs.  AMPs make use of Shadow AMP, which can be introduced in your PWA. This AMP library, loads in the top level page. It can amplify the portions in the content as decided by the developer and connect to a whole load of documents for rendering them out. As the AMP library is compiled and loaded only once for, the entire PWA, it would, in turn, reduce backend implementations and client complexity. How are they used in the real world scenario: Shopping PWAMP offers a high engagement feature to the shoppers. Because AMP sites are automatically kept at the top by Google search engines, AMP attracts the customers to your sites by the faster discovery of the apps. The PWA keeps them thereby allowing a rich, immersive, and app-like shopping experience that keeps the shoppers engaged. Lancôme, the L’Oréal Paris cosmetics brand is soon combining AMP with their existing PWA. Their PWA had led to a 17% year over year increase in the mobile sales. With the addition of AMP, they aim to build lightweight mobile pages that load as fast as possible on smartphones to make the site faster and more engaging. Travel PWAMP features allow users to browse through a list of hotels which instantly loads up at the first click. The customer may then book a hotel of his choice in the subsequent click which upgrades him to the PWA experience. Wego, is a Singapore-based travel service. Its PWAMP has achieved a load time for new users at 1.6 seconds and 1 second for returning customers. This has helped to increase site visits by 26%, reduce bounce rates by 20% and increase conversions by 95%, since its launch. News and Media Progressive Web AMPs are also highly useful in the news apps. As the user engages with content using AMP, PWA downloads in the background creating frictionless, uninterrupted reading. Washington Post has come up with one such app where users can experience the Progressive Web App when reading an AMP article and clicking through to the PWA link when it appears in the menu. In addition, their PWA icon can be added to a user’s home screen through the phone’s browser. All the above examples showcase how the concoction proves to always be fast no matter what. Progressive Web AMPs are progressively enhanced with just one backend-the AMP to rule them all meaning that deploy targets are reduced considerably. So all ecosystems namely web, Android, and iOS are supported with just thin layers of extra code. Thus making them highly beneficial in cases of constrained engineering resources or reduced infrastructure complexity. In addition to this, Progressive Web AMPs are highly useful when a site has a lot of static content on individual pages, such as travel, media, news etc. All these statements assert the fact that PWAMP has the power to provide a full mobile web experience with an artful and strategic combination of the AMP and PWA technologies. To know more about how to build your own Progressive Web AMPs, you can visit the official developer’s website. Read Next: Top frameworks for building your Progressive Web Apps (PWA)5 reasons why your next app should be a PWA (progressive web app)Build powerful progressive web apps with Firebaselast_img read more