Market capitalisation of Tata companies at 127 billion

first_imgA man looks at a screen displaying news of markets update inside the Bombay Stock Exchange (BSE) building in Mumbai, June 20, 2016.Reuters fileThe combined market capitalisation of the listed companies of the Tata Group stood at $127.62 billion, or Rs 8,12,877 crore, as of April 27, 2017, based on the closing share prices of the respective companies. The top three listed entities are TCS, Tata Motors and Tata Steel.There are 17 listed entities that include lifestyle company Titan; hospitality venture Indian Hotels Co.; air-conditioner maker Voltas; retail company Trent; telecom ventures Tata Communications and Tata Teleservices (Maharashtra), and non-alcoholic beverages maker Tata Global Beverages, in addition to the three referred above.TCS had market capitalisation of Rs 4,53,474 crore ($70.69 billion), Tata Motors Rs 1,31,649 crore ($20.52 billion) and Tata Steel Rs 43,292 crore ($6.75 billion). On Friday (April 27), TCS shares closed 1.27 percent lower at Rs 2,272, Tata Motors gained 0.41 percent at Rs 458 and Tata Steel ended at Rs 449, up 0.70 percent. The BSE Sensex closed 111 points down at 29,918 on Friday.The April 27 valuation mark a significant fall from $130.80 billion (Rs 8,44,314 crore) as of April 6, 2017.TCS has declared its Q4 and FY2017 results while most of the other companies are yet to do so. Tata Motors will be declaring its April vehicle sales next Monday/Tuesday.The Tata Group comprises more than 100 companies operating in about 100 countries. In 2015-16, the combined revenue of the Tata Group was $103.51 billion.  Market capitalisation of Tata Group.tata.comlast_img read more

S Sudan doctor wins UN refugee prize

first_imgUNHCR logoA South Sudanese doctor who runs an overcrowded hospital with a dimly-lit surgical theatre and no regular supply of general anaesthesia on Tuesday won the UN refugee agency’s prestigious Nansen award.Evan Atar Adaha’s Maban hospital in the South Sudanese town of Bunj serves more than 144,000 refugees from Blue Nile state in neighbouring Sudan, UNHCR said.The hospital’s X-ray machine is broken, but Atar and his team perform nearly 60 surgeries per week in a room with just one light, with staff using “ketamine injections and spinal epidurals” instead of general anaesthesia, the agency said.UNHCR chief Filippo Grandi said Atar’s “profound humanity and selflessness” had saved thousands of lives.Atar had previously run a hospital in Blue Nile but was forced to relocate when a conflict erupted there in 2011 between the Khartoum government and rebel fighters.Khartoum unilaterally announced a ceasefire in the area in March.The Nansen prize, awarded annually, is named for Norwegian polar explorer Fridtjof Nansen, who served as the first high commissioner for refugees during the failed League of Nations.Last year’s winner was Nigerian Zannah Mustapha, who helped negotiate the release of some of the girls kidnapped by Boko Haram Islamists from their school in Chibok in 2014.UNHCR said actor and goodwill ambassador Cate Blanchet will deliver the keynote address at the ceremony in Geneva next week.last_img read more

Mamata asks people to eradicate the menace of open defecation

first_imgKolkata: On the occasion of World Toilet Day, West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee Monday asked people to eradicate the menace of open defecation. Banerjee said 11 districts of the state have become open defecation free (ODF). “On #WorldToiletDay today, let us pledge to eradicate the menace of open defecation. Our states flagship programme, #MissionNirmalBangla, has been very successful,” Banerjee wrote on her Twitter handle this morning. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeShe said “As of May, 2018, 11 districts, 33,261 villages, 2,621 gram panchayats and 255 blocks in the state have become #ODF.” The Mission Nirmal Bangla initiated by West Bengal government endeavours to achieve the larger objective of reduction in child mortality and morbidity, overall mortality and morbidity by reducing chances of water-borne and fecal- borne diseases due to prevalence of open defecation. World Toilet Day is an official United Nations international observance day on November 19 to inspire action to tackle the global sanitation crisis.last_img read more

Lavabit Founder Developing New Email Encryption Tool to Keep Government Out

first_img After shutting down their email services amid concerns about government surveillance, two companies are partnering up to launch a secure-messaging tool, one that will stop prying eyes from viewing private information.Ladar Levison, the founder of Lavabit, the email provider Edward Snowden used, is teaming up with encrypted-communication firm Silent Circle to launch Dark Mail, an alliance focused on providing open-sourced peer-to-peer email with end-to-end encryption. Related: Amid Surveillance Concerns, Email Services Pull Plug on Themselves The major difference between Dark Mail’s approach and that of traditional email services is who holds these encrypted, or SSL, keys. Typically, the responsibility has always been on the email provider but Dark Mail wants to change that. Instead, the alliance is hoping to develop email add-ons where users, not providers, will be assigned private encryption keys that will be on put on personal computers or mobile devices. This shift will allow for email-service providers to be protected from government agencies, because if they ask for records or data, the company will have no usable data to handover. Besides providing a secure-communication tool for Dark Mail users, the founders plan on allowing for the service to be used in conjunction with other email providers, like Gmail. The company envisions utilizing a stoplight interface to determine if the email is being sent over unencrypted or encrypted channels. So if a message goes between two Dark Mail users, a green light will appear. But if the message is between a Dark Mail user and a Gmail user, a red light will appear. While many people will be cheering for more privacy, in order for the technology behind Dark Mail Alliance to scale, it needs to get other service providers on board and integrate the technology. But providers may be hesitant to join, as they not only may anger government officials but also provide an ultra-secure setting for criminals to communicate. The service will officially launch in 2014 and Dark Mail Alliance hopes at least 20 providers will have joined the group by then, according to tech-blog site The Verge. The organization does plan on charging for the email service but the actual code will be free for businesses to use.Related: Another Site Shuts Down on Government Surveillance Fears This new endeavor comes after Levison shut down Lavabit after receiving a search warrant from the federal government this past summer to hand over the encryption keys so the agency could gain access to all web traffic, including Snowden’s activities. Even though the government wasn’t pursuing Silent Circle, the company followed suit and shut down its secure-email platform Silent Mail.Would you use tools by Dark Mail? Let us know in the comments below. 3 min read October 31, 2013 Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right.center_img Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals Register Now »last_img read more

Life on exoplanets may give off a fluorescent glow

first_img Powered by Scientists at Cornell University say that life-bearing exoplanets may be detectable by their soft glow. Based on laboratory studies, the team led by Jack O’Malley-James at Cornell’s Carl Sagan Institute believes that a mechanism that protects organisms from hard ultraviolet radiation could make worlds beyond the solar system radiate a soft, detectable light.Anyone who has watched fireflies flitting about in the night sky is familiar with the idea of organisms producing light. Not only can some insects light up, but so can fish, squid, bacteria and many others, for a variety reasons that include attracting mates, camouflage, decoying prey, and marking territory. But there is another type of luminescence called “photoprotective biofluorescence,” which is a protective mechanism found in some species of undersea corals that live at a shallow enough depth for ultraviolet radiation from the Sun to penetrate. Normally, such radiation would be absorbed by the tissues, resulting in a nasty and possibly fatal case of marine sunburn, but these polyps have a trick up their non-existent sleeves.What happens is that biofluorescent proteins in the coral’s tissues absorb the UV radiation, exciting an electron and raising it to an unstable energy state. As the electron returns to its stable state it re-emits radiation in the visible band of the light spectrum. The result is that the UV is rendered harmless and the animal fluoresces. What occurred to the Cornell teams was that this mechanism could be handy to any extraterrestrial life that happened to evolve in a particularly nasty environment, such as in the habitable zone of M-type stars, where a large number of exoplanets have been found. M-type stars tend to emit ultraviolet flares, which is bad news for any organisms on planets orbiting them, but if they used biofluorescence to protect themselves, not only would this give them a fighting chance, it would also produce a biosignature that could be detected by telescopes when the flare hits the planet, causing it to temporarily fluoresce.To test this hypothesis, the team studied the spectral emissions of common fluorescent corals and used this to produce model spectra and colors that could be found on exoplanets orbiting M-type stars. They concluded that the strength of this glow could be enough to be detected by telescopes currently under development. “These biotic kinds of exoplanets are very good targets in our search for exoplanets, and these luminescent wonders are among our best bets for finding life on exoplanets,” says O’Malley-James.The research was published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.Source: Cornell University We recommend Google Analytics settings Privacy policy I consent to the use of Google Analytics and related cookies across the TrendMD network (widget, website, blog). Learn more Yes Nolast_img read more