Nipah outbreak hits Kerala again authorities open isolation wards in Kochi hospital

first_imgReutersIn 2018, the entire state of Kerala was in a state of panic as the Nipah virus claimed the lives of 17 people. And now, on June 03, 2019, health authorities in Kerala have hinted at a possible Nipah outbreak. As per reports, authorities have sent the blood sample of the suspected patient to the Pune virology institute, and the entire state is waiting to know whether the dreaded virus has made its way to Kerala. K K Shailaja, Kerala health minister, revealed that the suspected patient has shown signs of Nipah. However, she made it clear that the confirmation will be made only after the blood test. Shailaja also urged people to stay calm and revealed that the state is taking all necessary measures to ensure the safety of citizens.”It is not yet confirmed. But, the suspect patient has shown signs of Nipah. If anyone starts suffering from fever and severe cough, do not try to hide it, you should immediately seek medical advice. We have experience in handling emergency situations. Last year, we had a tough time, but this year, we will ensure that no one will die due to this virus,” said Shailaja. The District Medical Officer urged people not to panic and added that everything is under control now. The DMO also revealed that the place of origin of the current Nipah outbreak was not Ernakulam district.As a precautionary measure, the health ministry has ordered to open five isolation wards in Kalamassery Medical College, Cochin. The health ministry has also apparently asked health professionals in both government and private sectors to stay alert.As per the latest updates, a team of doctors and nurses who handled last year’s Nipah outbreak has already started their journey to Cochin. This team led by Dr. Chandini will work with experts in Cochin to formulate an effective treatment plan.last_img read more

Chinese gazetteers documented decline of Hainan gibbons for over 400 years

first_img Ancient Chinese archives track decline of rare apes Citation: Chinese gazetteers documented decline of Hainan gibbons for over 400 years (2015, August 6) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-08-chinese-gazetteers-documented-decline-hainan.html Credit: Zoological Society of London Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org)—A trio of researchers, two with the Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London and the other with the University of Queensland in Australia, has found they were able to trace the decline of the Hainan gibbon over the course of 400 years, by reading commissioned historical records. In their paper, published on the open access site Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Samuel Turvey, Jennifer Crees and Martina Di Fonzo describe what they found in the literature, what they learned about the demise of the Hainan gibbon, and why they believe what they learned might help the monkey-looking apes make a comeback.center_img Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society B © 2015 Phys.org More information: Historical data as a baseline for conservation: reconstructing long-term faunal extinction dynamics in Late Imperial–modern China, Published 5 August 2015.DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2015.1299AbstractExtinction events typically represent extended processes of decline that cannot be reconstructed using short-term studies. Long-term archives are necessary to determine past baselines and the extent of human-caused biodiversity change, but the capacity of historical datasets to provide predictive power for conservation must be assessed within a robust analytical framework. Local Chinese gazetteers represent a more than 400-year country-level dataset containing abundant information on past environmental conditions and include extensive records of gibbons, which have a restricted present-day distribution but formerly occurred across much of China. Gibbons show pre-twentieth century range contraction, with significant fragmentation by the mid-eighteenth century and population loss escalating in the late nineteenth century. Isolated gibbon populations persisted for about 40 years before local extinction. Populations persisted for longer at higher elevations, and disappeared earlier from northern and eastern regions, with the biogeography of population loss consistent with the contagion model of range collapse in response to human demographic expansion spreading directionally across China. The long-term Chinese historical record can track extinction events and human interactions with the environment across much longer timescales than are usually addressed in ecology, contributing novel baselines for conservation and an increased understanding of extinction dynamics and species vulnerability or resilience to human pressures. The Hainan gibbon is under a very serious threat of extinction—currently there are only about 26 to 28 of them left, all living in their native China (on Hainan Island). There used to be many more, in fact, they used to dwell in over 20 of modern day China providences, and were described as very common.Charting the slow demise of a species, as the research trio note, is often difficult as it typically occurs over more yeas than a person can document. In this case, however, the researchers were aided by gazetteers working for Chinese bureaucracies over the past several hundred years. In addition to noting population and commerce activities, record-keeping was also done for natural resources, which included local animal sightings. Hainan gibbon sightings have been described in such logs for approximately 400 years, the team reports, giving them a way to track not just gibbon population declines, but the manner in which it occurred. They were able to see, for example, that as expected, gibbon populations declined as human populations rose. They were actually able to note declines by geographic area, and to correlate what they found with human population growth and land being converted from natural habitat to farming. Both, they say, clearly led to the current low numbers for the species.The team also reports that they were able to see serious fragmentation of gibbon populations starting around the mid-eighteenth century, with population losses moving faster into the latter parts of the nineteenth century. They also found that the apes managed to hold out longer in higher elevation areas, but disappeared faster in the north and eastern regions.On a more positive note, the team suggests that what they have learned might actually help prevent the disappearance of the Hainan gibbon altogether, because it could lead to a better conservation plan for those animals that still remain.last_img read more

Dont miss the magic

first_imgIn a bid to spread awareness about magical performances and give it a grand entry into the city, Delhi Tourism in association with Government of NCT of Delhi organises the 4th International Magic Festival at Dilli Haat, Janak Puri, INA and Pitampura. This three-day long festival that opens today aims to attract people and popularise the long standing tradition of magical arts in the country.International and Indian magicians from diverse backgrounds will present their legerdemain skills to ensnare the audience. The programs are designed in a way that grasp the interest level of all age groups, with grand and interactive gala shows (by both national and international magicians) being the main attraction. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The venue will be an open host to ancient (Majma) and modern forms of street magic (like that by David Blaine). In addition to all these performances across all the three Dilli Haats by Delhi Tourism; Dilli Haat, Janak Puri will be showcasing an exhibition on history of Indian magic and its forms.People will be given an opportunity to learn about the early days of magic in India through an informative presentation. A short workshop for people on creating magic from day to day objects like pens, paper, coins and handkerchief will also be hosted. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixMalkinn (Malaysia), Jorinee (Malaysia), Mamada (Bangkok) and Steven Cambian (United States) are few of the masters of magic, who are set to give an international twist with their performances. The festival will also be displaying few of the rarely seen fire and levitation acts by Kharbanda Brothers. Brij Mohan from Bihar will be adding laughter to his magic shows to tickle your funny bone. Drawing competition of children will also be hosted at Dilli Haat Janak Puri and Pitampura. Where: Dilli Haat, Janak Puri, INA and Pitampura When: 26 – 28 September Timing: 5 pm to 9 pmlast_img read more

Life on exoplanets may give off a fluorescent glow

first_img Powered by Scientists at Cornell University say that life-bearing exoplanets may be detectable by their soft glow. Based on laboratory studies, the team led by Jack O’Malley-James at Cornell’s Carl Sagan Institute believes that a mechanism that protects organisms from hard ultraviolet radiation could make worlds beyond the solar system radiate a soft, detectable light.Anyone who has watched fireflies flitting about in the night sky is familiar with the idea of organisms producing light. Not only can some insects light up, but so can fish, squid, bacteria and many others, for a variety reasons that include attracting mates, camouflage, decoying prey, and marking territory. But there is another type of luminescence called “photoprotective biofluorescence,” which is a protective mechanism found in some species of undersea corals that live at a shallow enough depth for ultraviolet radiation from the Sun to penetrate. Normally, such radiation would be absorbed by the tissues, resulting in a nasty and possibly fatal case of marine sunburn, but these polyps have a trick up their non-existent sleeves.What happens is that biofluorescent proteins in the coral’s tissues absorb the UV radiation, exciting an electron and raising it to an unstable energy state. As the electron returns to its stable state it re-emits radiation in the visible band of the light spectrum. The result is that the UV is rendered harmless and the animal fluoresces. What occurred to the Cornell teams was that this mechanism could be handy to any extraterrestrial life that happened to evolve in a particularly nasty environment, such as in the habitable zone of M-type stars, where a large number of exoplanets have been found. M-type stars tend to emit ultraviolet flares, which is bad news for any organisms on planets orbiting them, but if they used biofluorescence to protect themselves, not only would this give them a fighting chance, it would also produce a biosignature that could be detected by telescopes when the flare hits the planet, causing it to temporarily fluoresce.To test this hypothesis, the team studied the spectral emissions of common fluorescent corals and used this to produce model spectra and colors that could be found on exoplanets orbiting M-type stars. They concluded that the strength of this glow could be enough to be detected by telescopes currently under development. “These biotic kinds of exoplanets are very good targets in our search for exoplanets, and these luminescent wonders are among our best bets for finding life on exoplanets,” says O’Malley-James.The research was published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.Source: Cornell University We recommend Google Analytics settings Privacy policy I consent to the use of Google Analytics and related cookies across the TrendMD network (widget, website, blog). Learn more Yes Nolast_img read more

Major South Cheshire road closed due to accident

first_imgThe road is closed between points A and B (Image: Inrix) Want to keep up to date with the latest traffic and travel news?Each day Stoke-on-Trent Live journalists bring you the latest news on the roads and railways across Stoke-on-Trent, North Staffordshire, South Cheshire and further afield to help keep you on the move. For the very latest updates on roads including the M6, A500, A50 and more, visit our dedicated traffic and travel news channel here. We also run a live news feed each weekday, which you can access on our website’s homepage from 7am to 9pm from Monday to Friday. And for more as-we-get-it updates on the roads across the region and beyond, join The Sentinel’s traffic and travel Facebook group here. Get the biggest Daily stories by emailSubscribeSee our privacy noticeThank you for subscribingSee our privacy noticeCould not subscribe, try again laterInvalid EmailA major road is closed due to an accident in South Cheshire tonight. The A50 Street Lane is closed due to an accident between Townsend Lane ( Rode Heath) and Church Lane (Fourlanes End). The road is currently shut in both directions following the accident, which is believed to have taken place at around 11pm. We have no further details on the nature of the accident at this stage. The closure is affecting traffic between Rode Heath and Holmes Chapel, according to traffic data company INRIX. We’ll bring you an update on this story when one becomes available. Read MorePolice searching for missing 13-year-old last seen at railway stationlast_img read more