ED nets Satish Sana Babu the man behind CBI vs CBI battle

first_imgNew Delhi: The ED on Friday night arrested Hyderabad-based businessman Satish Sana Babu, based on whose complaint, the CBI had registered a corruption case against its own former Special Director Rakesh Asthana. The ED arrested Sana from Delhi in connection with a PMLA case it is probing against controversial meat exporter Moin Qureshi and others, including former CBI director AP Singh.Sana was produced in Special court here, which granted ED five days custodial remand, remarking that “It is an investigation that is going on for a long time… certain contradictions have appeared… that is why he has been arrested. ED has made the arrest on its own risk.” Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c detailsThe ED had registered a money laundering case in the matter in 2017 based on a CBI FIR that accused Qureshi of acting as a middleman to pull favours with several senior public office holders, including Singh. Sana is also part of this probe. In fact, Sana had made a complaint to the CBI last year that threw the agency into an internal war. Former Director Alok Verma got ready to probe Asthana based on Sana’s statement and Asthana subsequently made serious allegations of corruption against Verma. The CBI infighting continued with several officers being transferred; Verma resigned from service and Asthana was moved to the Civil Aviation Bureau and National Security Advisor Ajit Doval somehow came into the mix as it came to light that his phone was allegedly being tapped. Also Read – Tourists to be allowed in J&K from ThursdayThe reason Sana’s complaint rocked the probe agency last October was the seriousness of his allegations. According the subsequent FIR that the CBI registered, there seemed to be a connection between summons being issued to Sana, illegal gratification received by Asthana, Devinder Kumar, and Samanth Goel (public officials) and the relief provided to Sana subsequently. Sana was summoned by the CBI four times between October and December and it was allegedly agreed upon that Rs 5 crore needed to be paid to stop further harassment. Rs 3 crore was allegedly paid on December 10 and 13, 2017, after which the summons to Sana stopped. The businessman, however, was being pressurised to pay the rest of the amount, Rs 2 crore. Interestingly, Asthana had claimed that it was former director Alok Verma who had taken the Rs 2 crore to provide relief to Sana. The Central Bureau of Investigation is still probing the case against Rakesh Asthana.last_img read more

JAMAICA DPP emphasizes importance of digital audio recording in the courts

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Jamaica, November 15, 2017 – Kingston – Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP), Paula Llewellyn, has hailed the provision of digital audio-recording and video-link technology to more than 71 courts and seven hearing rooms across the island.The DPP said the technology represents “part of the evolutionary process of what happens when the appropriate resources are put into the justice system”.“It means that the justice system operating in the 21st Century is now becoming a reality,” she added.Ms. Llewellyn was speaking to JIS News following the handover of the equipment at the Supreme Court in downtown Kingston on November 13.   Funding for the equipment was provided by the European Union (EU) in the sum of $232 million under the Justice, Security, Accountability and Transparency (JSAT) programme.Ms. Llewellyn said the equipment “will allow the judges who take longhand to be more efficient, and will cut the time (spent) taking notes”.“It will allow defence counsel and prosecuting counsel to be on the cutting edge and very prepared, because a lot of the cases will go a little quicker,” she said.It is estimated that there are 35,000 cases in the parish courts and 2,000 cases in the Circuit Court.President of the Jamaican Bar Association, Jacqueline Cummings, also shared the sentiments of the DPP, noting that the equipment will help to “speed up most trials”.“At the end of the day, when the transcript is produced and handed to the attorney, they will no longer have piles and piles of paperwork to do.   They can either have it in electronic form or in print,” she said. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:last_img read more

HASC Gears up for Authorization Markup even as Topline Spending Remains Uncertain

first_imgThe House Armed Services Committee is slated to mark up the fiscal 2017 defense authorization bill in two weeks, but because the Republican conference has failed to coalesce around a budget resolution the committee still doesn’t know exactly how much money is available for defense programs next year.While the annual policy bill does not actually allocate funding, the House Armed Services Committee tries to align its funding levels with the chamber’s budget resolution so the measure can serve as a guideline for defense appropriators, reported CQ Roll Call.Up to $18 billion in available funding is in question as the budget resolution approved by the House Budget Committee provides an extra $18 billion in base defense spending beyond the Obama administration’s budget request. The resolution, however, still adheres to the FY 2017 spending levels agreed to in October’s two-year budget deal, limiting base spending on national security to $551 billion and providing $59 billion in DOD’s overseas contingency operations (OCO) account.In contrast to the administration’s request, the House framework would shift $23 billion from the OCO account to the base defense budget for a total of $574 billion in base defense spending in FY 2017. The Pentagon’s request only proposed shifting $5 billion to the base budget.If the House Armed Services Committee relies on the OCO account to augment the Pentagon’s base budget, it could lose the support of fiscal conservatives needed to advance the authorization bill to the floor, according to the story.The House Armed Services subcommittees are scheduled to mark up their portions of the authorization bill from April 20-21, with the full committee taking up the legislation on April 27. The Readiness Subcommittee will mark up its section on April 21 at 9:30 a.m. Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

Chinese gazetteers documented decline of Hainan gibbons for over 400 years

first_img Ancient Chinese archives track decline of rare apes Citation: Chinese gazetteers documented decline of Hainan gibbons for over 400 years (2015, August 6) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-08-chinese-gazetteers-documented-decline-hainan.html Credit: Zoological Society of London Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org)—A trio of researchers, two with the Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London and the other with the University of Queensland in Australia, has found they were able to trace the decline of the Hainan gibbon over the course of 400 years, by reading commissioned historical records. In their paper, published on the open access site Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Samuel Turvey, Jennifer Crees and Martina Di Fonzo describe what they found in the literature, what they learned about the demise of the Hainan gibbon, and why they believe what they learned might help the monkey-looking apes make a comeback.center_img Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society B © 2015 Phys.org More information: Historical data as a baseline for conservation: reconstructing long-term faunal extinction dynamics in Late Imperial–modern China, Published 5 August 2015.DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2015.1299AbstractExtinction events typically represent extended processes of decline that cannot be reconstructed using short-term studies. Long-term archives are necessary to determine past baselines and the extent of human-caused biodiversity change, but the capacity of historical datasets to provide predictive power for conservation must be assessed within a robust analytical framework. Local Chinese gazetteers represent a more than 400-year country-level dataset containing abundant information on past environmental conditions and include extensive records of gibbons, which have a restricted present-day distribution but formerly occurred across much of China. Gibbons show pre-twentieth century range contraction, with significant fragmentation by the mid-eighteenth century and population loss escalating in the late nineteenth century. Isolated gibbon populations persisted for about 40 years before local extinction. Populations persisted for longer at higher elevations, and disappeared earlier from northern and eastern regions, with the biogeography of population loss consistent with the contagion model of range collapse in response to human demographic expansion spreading directionally across China. The long-term Chinese historical record can track extinction events and human interactions with the environment across much longer timescales than are usually addressed in ecology, contributing novel baselines for conservation and an increased understanding of extinction dynamics and species vulnerability or resilience to human pressures. The Hainan gibbon is under a very serious threat of extinction—currently there are only about 26 to 28 of them left, all living in their native China (on Hainan Island). There used to be many more, in fact, they used to dwell in over 20 of modern day China providences, and were described as very common.Charting the slow demise of a species, as the research trio note, is often difficult as it typically occurs over more yeas than a person can document. In this case, however, the researchers were aided by gazetteers working for Chinese bureaucracies over the past several hundred years. In addition to noting population and commerce activities, record-keeping was also done for natural resources, which included local animal sightings. Hainan gibbon sightings have been described in such logs for approximately 400 years, the team reports, giving them a way to track not just gibbon population declines, but the manner in which it occurred. They were able to see, for example, that as expected, gibbon populations declined as human populations rose. They were actually able to note declines by geographic area, and to correlate what they found with human population growth and land being converted from natural habitat to farming. Both, they say, clearly led to the current low numbers for the species.The team also reports that they were able to see serious fragmentation of gibbon populations starting around the mid-eighteenth century, with population losses moving faster into the latter parts of the nineteenth century. They also found that the apes managed to hold out longer in higher elevation areas, but disappeared faster in the north and eastern regions.On a more positive note, the team suggests that what they have learned might actually help prevent the disappearance of the Hainan gibbon altogether, because it could lead to a better conservation plan for those animals that still remain.last_img read more

8 Great TimeTracking Apps for Freelancers

first_img Register Now » Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. January 27, 2016 If you’re trying to pick a time-tracking app to help you stay organized, focused, and on task, you’ve probably noticed the multitude of options out there. A new option pops up every day, and they all seem to do the same thing.But not all time-tracking apps are created equal. Some are created with remote teams in mind, while others prioritize individual freelancers. Some adopt the mindset of the freelance worker, while others focus on making life easier for managers. Many are even downright creepy and seem to offer little to no privacy for those who install them.Those who try to find the best time-tracking app are often left with a lot of questions. That’s why we’re breaking through all of these questions and barriers to create a list of the top 8 tracking apps, specifically for freelancers.Here are the best time tracking apps for freelancers to help boost your productivity and track your work:1. Due Time TrackingPrice: Free for LifeDue is an extremely unobtrusive app that allows you to track time with automatic idle time detection. Simply start the timer, and a new session will start immediately. As you proceed with a project, you can use Due time tracking to generate invoices based on the hourly rates you set. This time tracking app also makes it easy to organize clients’ information by name, address, hourly rates, or even different currencies.2. CalendarPrice: Free / $10 per month for automated meeting transcriptions and calendar analyticsCalendar is the next generation of the calendar app. With easy to use time tracking, schedule management, and meeting scheduling, Calendar offers desktop and mobile (iOS and Android) platforms that allows you to sync and share multiple digital calendars as well as leverage machine-learning algorithms that serve as a virtual assistant. You’ll be able to track and manage how you spend your time and become more efficient at scheduling meetings and events with easy to use calendar analytics.Related: 7 Ways to Follow and Measure Your Content Engagement3. HarvestPrice: $12/month for Solo; $49/month for Basic; $99/month for BusinessHarvest is another great time-tracking option for freelancers, since you can use it to track a number of different projects at the same time, even if they contain different tasks and charge different rates. If you’re working with a team, you can even assign various tasks within a project to specific team members. Additionally, it’s extremely easy to integrate if you’re working with other apps that help with remote work, like Basecamp.Besides the hefty pricing, Harvest’s only other major downside is that the app doesn’t include desktop monitoring options like active application or URL tracking.4. TopTrackerPrice: FreeTopTracker earns the number one spot on this list, since it was built by a top freelancing network specifically with freelancers in mind, and isn’t tied to any job platform. Unlike other time-tracking apps, TopTracker is completely free (without any version limitations) and gives freelancers complete control over what gets tracked and how often.TopTracker makes use of all the normal time-tracking tools like timers, screenshots, and webcam shots, but freelancers are able to take total control by deciding how often things get tracked and adding options like tracking written task descriptions only or picture blurs. The free, standalone app is available across all devices and works on OS X and Windows, with Linux coming soon.5. TickPrice: $0-$149/monthIf you’re confused by the wide price range, Tick’s price depends on the number projects you have open at any given time. So if you’re a one-project-at-a-time freelancer, you can probably get away with using it free. But let’s be honest: If you were working on one project at a time, would you really need a time-tracking app? (And would you really make a livable salary?) Tick is simple, straightforward, and can be used across devices, but be wary of pricing if you’re the kind of freelancer who keeps a large number of projects open at once.Related: 6 Companies That Give All Year Long6. RescueTimePrice: Free for RescueTime Lite; $9/month for PremiumRescueTime is great for individual freelancers who want to know how they’re spending their time but don’t necessarily need to report back to any manager. Like other time-tracking apps on this list, RescueTime will give you detailed reports and an accurate picture of how you spend your days, but only to quench your own personal curiosity. The app does not send information to managers or clients.7. TogglPrice: Free for Basic; $5/month for Pro; $49/month for BusinessThe makers of Toggl created this time-tracking tool with speed and usability in mind, so even the busiest freelancer can make use of it. Reports generated with Toggl are easy on the eyes, and it tracks your work in real time, as long as you remember to turn it on. For the forgetful freelancers out there, Toggl also allows you to input work time after the fact. The app was built with team productivity in mind, so individual freelancers might run into some extraneous features.Related: 20 Reasons to Let Your Employees Work From Home8. Klok Desktop ApplicationPrice: $19.99Unless you want to use Klok to do a lot of team-based work, freelancers can get great results from its (cheaper) desktop application compared with its team console. This time-tracking app uses the data collected from past projects to help you estimate the amount of time you’ll need for projects in the future. The app also helps you divide your work into categories, so you can see how much time you spend in meetings versus on the phone versus self-marketing. Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals 5 min readlast_img read more