Honda Urban EV Rendered For Production

6 photos Source: Electric Vehicle News Honda Urban EV Imagined In Production Form Honda Urban EV Named Best Concept Car – 2018 Car Design Award At this point, the final model has not yet been presented by Honda, which generally does not provide much information about it. Fortunately, our illustrator is here to give us a first idea of what the Japanese brand is preparing for us.If the look of the concept is generally preserved, several elements have been retouched. Thus, our Urban EV forgets the two large suicide doors to adopt four doors opening in a more conventional day, and have flush handles. It also abandons the side cameras in favor of traditional mirrors, receives more conventional wheels and has a new shield incorporating a lower grid. In addition, it is content with a metal logo at the front (and no longer bright) and abandons the load indicators placed on the sidewalls. The two round headlights and the boss on the bonnet are still part of them.Finally, even so, the Urban EV remains crisp. We will quickly know if our illustrator has seen right or not, since Honda has promised to launch this model in the course of the year 2019. Honda Commits To Production Of Urban EV In 2019 The concept of 2017 will have a few changes…In the coming years, we should witness the birth of a new trend, that of the neo-retro electric cars. Like Volkswagen with the I.D. Buzz, or Peugeot with the e-Legend concept, Honda started clearing the field with the Urban EV. Originally presented as a concept at the Frankfurt motor show in 2017, this adorable city car will arrive on the European market in a few months.More Urban EV News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on September 28, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News read more

New US startup Tarform Motorcycles unveils their first electric motorcycle

Source: Charge Forward The field of electric motorcycles is growing quickly, with new offerings popping up on our radar nearly weekly. However, while we’re seeing a number of new electric motorcycle companies, there aren’t many options in the US.Tarform Motorcycles wants to change that with the unveiling of their new electric motorcycle. more…The post New US startup Tarform Motorcycles unveils their first electric motorcycle appeared first on Electrek.

Road Test 2018 Lexus LC 500h

Breathtaking Design, More Power Than You Need, 35 MPGThe Lexus 2018 LC 500h hybrid luxury grand tourer is deadly gorgeous, unworldly comfortable and blessedly fun to drive. If that’s not enough to get your attention, how does 35 mpg highway and 26 mpg city sound?The LC 500h–it’s got the lookThe LC 500h and its V8 powered variant is the automaker’s answer to quell criticism that its cars are boring, and too close in styling to the more mainstream cars of parent company Toyota.  Design, borrowed from the 2012 LF-LC concept car, was the blueprint to change buyers’ impression of Lexus, and compete with high-end luxury coupes and sports cars in the $100k price range.For similar money, buyers can choose everything from the Mercedes-Benz S-Class coupe, an entry-level Porsche 911 or Jaguar’s F-Type R. The LC tries to split the difference between sporty luxury cars and pure sports cars, handling both jobs competently well.While other choices may be more focused on performance, luxury or fuel efficiency, the LC 500h is the only one that does it all.Designed To ExciteVisually, the LC 500h is more than just eye candy, it’s a treat for the senses. It looks like a concept car rolling down the road, which is no accident. The overall design is aggressive with voluptuous sheetmetal. This bold coupé starts strong in the front with swept-back headlights and huge scoops, then narrows through the door line before widening to a pair of athletic rear haunches and a pair of rectangular exhaust pipes.The now signature Lexus “spindle grille” is in perfect proportions to the rest of the car, compared to other Lexus vehicles. It is very recognizable, unmistakable, with styling that can be seen from a far distance. Then there are small details such as door handles that pop out to attention, giving credence that the LC is the Lexus flagship coupe.Inside, the cabin’s styling isn’t as aggressive as the exterior, but a two-tier dashboard design looks as thoroughly modern as the exterior and integrates the central display screen and relevant controls in a clean way. The look and feel are modern and luxurious with a digital instrument cluster, leather-swathed surfaces, Alcantara-covered door panels. Our test-drive car featured semi-aniline leather-trimmed front seats with an Alcantara headliner.Less aggressive, but comfortableWhile other automakers rely on touchscreens, voice recognition or rotary click wheels, Lexus continues to use its “Remote Touch Interface,” a track pad similar to what you’d expect to find in a laptop. This setup makes it difficult to navigate through the array of menus needed to access different functions while driving. Apple CarPlay or Android Auto would cure some of those problems, but they aren’t available on the LC.The driver and passenger will be relatively content, and the seats are supportive and well-bolstered. While there is plenty of space in front, the rear seats will not accommodate full-size adults. However, they are adequate for small children or as extra luggage space.The only complaint about the interior was voiced by my grandson Gherit: “Except for the hood, you can’t enjoy the beauty of the exterior.” I agree.At just 4.7 cubic feet, the trunk isn’t exactly cavernous. It’s a tight fit, but a week’s worth of grocery shopping for two or a weekend for two can be accomplished.A New Take on A Hybrid SystemBeyond its knockout styling and gorgeously outfitted interior, the 2018 LC 500h has a new hybrid powertrain that Lexus calls Multi-Stage Hybrid. The company redesigned its two-electric motor hybrid system by mating it to a continuously variable transmission (CVT) and a four-speed automatic transmission. The big difference in Multi-Stage from the older transmission is the additional four-speed planetary gearbox attached at the CVT’s output. This combination provides the crisp shifts of a conventional 10-speed automatic.The internal-combustion engine is a new version of the 3.5-liter V-6 that runs on the more efficient Atkinson cycle exclusively and makes 295 horsepower at 6,600 rpm. With one of the motors drawing electricity from a compact, air-cooled 44-kW lithium-ion battery, the LC 500h produces a maximum of 354 horsepower.The 500h hybrid is a new systemCompared with the standard version’s 467 horsepower 5.0-liter V8, the LC 500h’s zero-to-60-mph sprint takes 4.8 seconds, just 0.2 seconds slower than the LC 500. So, the question becomes, why would you even consider buying the gas-powered edition that can only serve up 26-mpg highway and 19-mpg city? What, you need the auditory thrills of the V8?Like other Lexus models, the 2018 Lexus LC 500h has an abundance of configurable drive settings: Eco, Comfort, Normal, Custom, Sport, and Sport+. But choosing one is quite simple, just select one from the stalk mounted above and to the right of the steering wheel on the instrument cluster cowl.A Truly Pleasurable Driving ExperienceWhether running down the road of a two-lane highway, freeway or driving in town, the 2018 Lexus LC 500h is a pleasure and delight to drive. The really impressive thing is how seamlessly all of the pieces work together. The car effortlessly switches back and forth between gasoline and electric power, providing smooth power delivery throughout.  Full-throttle acceleration provides a nice punch from the rear wheels, and the LC 500h can cruise serenely on electric power for short bursts, even at 80 mph.The cabin felt roomy and, despite the narrow window openings, even offered decent outward visibility. The front seats provided plenty of bolstering to keep me and my passengers in place during hard cornering.From behind the wheel, the LC 500h always felt like a pretty big car, but it was remarkably easy to place on the road. Along with powerful brakes, that gave me the confidence to really attack corners. Responses were crisp, and the car was eager to change direction, with sharp turn-ins from the nicely weighted steering. It was a joy to maneuver on back roads.Over the course of nearly 400 miles of mixed driving, our LC 500h averaged 31.7 mpg according to the onboard trip computer. You won’t find another sports tourer that delivers anywhere close to that fuel economy and satisfies your need to drive an exciting and pleasurable car.The Car For you?Our test car was equipped with several performance-enhancing options, including $1,440 for 21-inch wheels wrapped in run-flat tires, a $390 limited-slip differential and the $5,960 Performance Package that brings a carbon-fiber roof, an active rear spoiler, rear-wheel steering and variable-ratio steering.  That brought our LC 500h as-tested price to $101,445. Yes, that is by no means cheap, yet it looks as if it costs double that.A lot of car for a lot of moneyThe 2018 Lexus LC 500h offers a combination of performance and luxury that should put it on any buyer’s radar. While other cars shine by focusing on a specific area, the LC 500h aims for a broader appeal without feeling diluted. Plus, the LC 500h has a secret weapon called miles-per-gallon.In order to give you the best perspective on the many vehicles available, Clean Fleet Report has a variety of contributors. When possible, we will offer you multiple perspectives on a given vehicle. This comes under SRO-Second Road Test Opinion. We hope you’ll enjoy these diverse views–some are just below—and let us know what you think in comments below or at publisher@cleanfleetreport.com.Road Test: 2018 Lexus LC 500 V8 (Gary’s view)Road Test: 2018 Lexus LC 500h (Steve’s view)Road Test: 2018 Lexus LC 500h (John’s view)Related Stories You Might Enjoy—Performance+Fuel EconomyEvent: Luxury EV Roundup from Pebble BeachNews: 2019 Mercedes-Benz CLS Goes HybridRoad Test: BMW 530e xDrive iPerformanceRoad Test: Audi A5 CoupleNews: 2019 Audi A8 Will Be a HybridNews: Infiniti Q Concept IntroducedDisclosure:Clean Fleet Report is loaned free test vehicles from automakers to evaluate, typically for a week at a time. Our road tests are based on this one-week drive of a new vehicle. Because of this we don’t address issues such as long-term reliability or total cost of ownership. In addition, we are often invited to manufacturer events highlighting new vehicles or technology. As part of these events we may be offered free transportation, lodging or meals. We do our best to present our unvarnished evaluations of vehicles and news irrespective of these inducements.Our focus is on vehicles that offer the best fuel economy in their class, which leads us to emphasize electric cars, plug-in hybrids, hybrids and diesels. We also feature those efficient gas-powered vehicles that are among the top mpg vehicles in their class. In addition, we aim to offer reviews and news on advanced technology and the alternative fuel vehicle market. We welcome any feedback from vehicle owners and are dedicated to providing a forum for alternative viewpoints. Please let us know your views at publisher@cleanfleetreport.com.The post Road Test: 2018 Lexus LC 500h appeared first on Clean Fleet Report. Source: Electric, Hybrid, Clean Diesel & High-MPG Vehicles read more

GV invests in Dandelion Energy after geothermal heatingcooling startup spun out from

first_imgProjects in the X Moonshot Factory often graduate to independent companies within the Alphabet umbrella. Other times they leaves the research lab without any affiliation, as was the case with Dandelion Energy. GV and Comcast Ventures today announced a $16 million investment in the geothermal-based home heating and cooling solution. more…The post GV invests in Dandelion Energy after geothermal heating/cooling startup spun out from Alphabet appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

I wrote a new book about electric motorcycles here are the top

first_imgAs an electric vehicle journalist specializing in two-wheelers, I’ve had the pleasure of riding many more than my fair share of electric motorbikes. I believe 2019 is the year that these powerful, efficient, and fun vehicles finally take off and receive the mass market attention that they deserve.And so it is with great pleasure that I get to announce that my latest book, Electric Motorcycles 2019, launches today. And it is available for up to 90% off for a limited time. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N8COKnXNH-EThe post I wrote a new book about electric motorcycles, here are the top 5 e-motos of 2019 appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

Tesla Model 3 Tracker Cumulative Production Exceeds 250000

first_imgWe don’t have official confirmation, but the 250,000th Tesla Model 3 was or soon will be produced.Source: Electric Vehicle Newslast_img

After 10 Years Of PlugIn Boom China Is Shifting Towards Fuel Cells

first_imgChina sets a target of 1 million hydrogen fuel cell cars in 2030.Source: Electric Vehicle Newslast_img

Tesla Model Y Electric Range Just 810 Less Than Model 3 Says

first_imgAs a crossover, a drop in range compared to the Model 3 is to be expected.Source: Electric Vehicle Newslast_img

Volkswagen up to 20000 preorders for its ID3 electric hatchback

first_imgA Volkswagen board member confirmed on Twitter today that the carmaker has now received more than 20,000 pre-orders for its ID.3 electric hatchback. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1zk7Eb8r-s&list=PL_Qf0A10763mA7Byw9ncZqxjke6Gjz0MtThe post Volkswagen up to 20,000 pre-orders for its ID.3 electric hatchback appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

Trendspotting

first_imgTrendspotting Trendspotting Soccer Share via Email Share on Messenger Kevin Pullein Share on WhatsApp Sport betting Share on Facebook Share on Twitter The popular image of a relegation “six- pointer” is of a tight, nervy, niggly game in which there are few goals but many cards. In reality these games are not greatly different from many others – and that may be worth knowing during a weekend in which there will be much at stake at the bottom as well as the top of various tables.Six of the bottom eight play each other in the Premier League, there are relegation scraps in the Championship and four of the bottom six play each other in League One. The important thing to realise about these fixtures is that, almost by definition, they involve teams of similar ability. That is not unusual, in the Premier League a third of all games feature teams separated by no more than four places.The average number of goals scored in Premier and Football League games during the last 10 seasons was 2.55. In games between teams who finished in the bottom four – the most desperate relegation dogfights – the average number of goals scored was also 2.55. In other words, the goalscoring pattern in these fixtures was no different from what it was in many others, which is not what most people imagine. In betting markets on relegation tussles it is the possibility of a high score that is most likely to be underestimated.And it is the possibility of a high number of cards that is most likely to be overestimated. The reputation these games have for being very dirty is undeserved. In most bookings markets 10 points are awarded for a yellow card and 25 for a red. The average make-up in the Premier League during the last 10 seasons was 36. In games between teams who finished in the bottom four it was a meagre 2½ points higher at 38.5.For all the hype a relegation six-pointer is usually much the same as most other fixtures between teams of broadly similar ability. The betting markets do not always recognise this. · Kevin Pullein is a football tipster for the Racing Post Share on LinkedIn Shares00center_img Trendspotting First published on Thu 20 Mar 2008 20.00 EDT Share on Twitter Reuse this content comment Share on Facebook Soccer Share on Pinterest Share via Email Topics Thu 20 Mar 2008 20.00 EDTlast_img read more

Cooke hits form amid British protests over lack of space

first_img Read more Cycling Share on Facebook Topics William Fotheringham Share via Email Share on Twitter Share via Email Shares00 Cooke hits form amid British protests over lack of space Cooke’s team-mate Sharon Laws continued to surprise in her first season of international racing, placing seventh to claim sixth overall and give a new look of strength in depth to the British women’s squad. “It’s good to have two serious players mixing it all the time,” said Winn. “Nicole has never had a team of this strength racing with her for GB.” Cooke’s next outing is likely to be the Grande Boucle Feminine stage race from June17-22.Meanwhile, in the professional men’s Giro d’Italia, the climbers dominated the weekend’s racing with the Italian Emmanuele Sella taking a brace of stage wins in the Dolomites. The 27-year-old, who also took a mountain stage in 2004, finished alone on Saturday at Alpe de Pampeago with a repeat yesterday in the race’s toughest stage finish, at the Dolomite Stars ski resort on the Passo Marmolada climb after five major ascents.Going into today’s short mountain time- trial to Plan de Corones, the race leader’s pink jersey will be on the shoulders of the Tour de France winner Alberto Contador of Spain, with the Italian favourites Riccardo Ricco and Danilo di Luca – the 2007 winner – within a minute. The overnight race leader, Di Luca’s team-mate Gabriele Bososio, finished almost 15 minutes behind. Thus far, there has been little to separate Di Luca, Ricco and Contador, although today’s stage should shake up the order again.Yesterday, Ricco was the principal attacker on the eight-mile climb through tunnels, rock gorges and waterfalls to the finish in chilly, wet conditions amid snowdrifts. The young Italian made repeated efforts to break clear of a lead group that included Di Luca and Contador and the double winner Gilberto Simoni, but at the finish he gained only nine seconds on the 2007 winner, with Contador and Simoni a further eight seconds back.The six-strong British contingent includes the Olympic champion Bradley Wiggins, and other Beijing hopefuls Geraint Thomas, Steve Cummings and Mark Cavendish, all of whom survived the mountain stages, finishing together in a 60-strong group of non-climbers. Confirming her return to form as the build-up to Beijing begins in earnest, Nicole Cooke finished third on yesterday’s final stage of the nine-day Tour de l’Aude, with the Great Britain team putting in a written protest to the referees amid claims that the stage winner Judith Arndt of Germany had moved off her line in the finish sprint to deny Cooke road space.”Arndt moved across and looked to have shut the door, we did protest but there you go,” said the Great Britain manager Julian Winn. Overall, Cooke moved up to fourth on the 71km run to the town of Limoux in South-West France, building on her victory on the opening stage. “Nicole has been in the mix all week and will get good form from this,” said Winn. “It’s a good foundation for what is coming up.” Share on LinkedIn Share on WhatsApp Since you’re here… Share on Twitter First published on Sun 25 May 2008 19.01 EDT Share on Facebook … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Share on Pinterest Sun 25 May 2008 19.01 EDT Support The Guardian The Recap: sign up for the best of the Guardian’s sport coverage Cooke’s team complained that a rival had tried to deny the Briton road space during the sprint finish. Photograph: Franck Fife/AFP-Getty Images Cycling Share on Messenger Reuse this contentlast_img read more

What You Need To Know From Q1

first_img Learn More & Register FCPA Institute – Boston (Oct. 3-4) A unique two-day learning experience ideal for a diverse group of professionals seeking to elevate their FCPA knowledge and practical skills through active learning. Learn more, spend less. CLE credit is available. This post provides a summary of Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement activity and related developments from the first quarter of 2019. Although three quarters remain in 2019, FCPA enforcement this year is already the 5th largest in FCPA history (from a settlement amount perspective – $1.11 billion) (see here).DOJ Enforcement (Corporate)The DOJ brought three corporate FCPA enforcement action in the first quarter. DOJ actual recovery in these actions was approximately $835 million. Cognizant Technology Solutions (Feb. 15)See here, here and here for prior posts.Charges: NoneResolution Vehicle: Declination with disgorgementGuidelines Range: Not mentioned in the letter agreementSettlement: None, the letter agreement refers to disgorgement of $19,370,561 which the DOJ credited based on the parallel resolution with the SECOrigin: Voluntary disclosureMonitor: NoIndividuals Charged: YesMTS (March 6)See here and here for prior postsCharges: As to Kolorit Dizayn Ink LLC, criminal information charging conspiracy to violate the FCPA’s anti-bribery and books and records provisions; as to MTS criminal information charging conspiracy to violate the FCPA’s anti-bribery and books and records provisionsResolution Vehicle: Kolorit resolved the charges through a plea agreement; MTS resolved the charges through a DPAGuidelines Range: The DPA references an advisory guidelines range of $673 million to $1.35 billionSettlement: $750 millionOrigin: The related Uzbekistan matters (MTS, Telia, and Vimpelcom) began with foreign media reportingMonitor: YesIndividuals Charged: NoFresenius (March 29)See here for a prior postCharges: NoneResolution Vehicle: NPAGuidelines Range: None referenced in the NPA although it states “40% off of the bottom” of the guidelines rangeSettlement: $84.7 millionOrigin: Voluntary disclosureMonitor: YesIndividuals Charged: NoDOJ Enforcement (Individual)The DOJ brought or announced five core individual actions in the first quarter against nine individuals.As highlighted here, former Credit Suisse bankers Andrew Pearse, Surjan Singh, and Detelina Subeva were criminally charged with conspiracy to violate the FCPA’s anti-bribery and internal controls provisions in connection with financing various Mozambican maritime projects.As highlighted here, James Lyon (the owner of Lyon Associates Inc. – a privately-held engineering and consulting company headquartered in Hawaii) was criminally charged and pleaded guilty to charges concerning bribery of Micronesian and Hawaiian officials.As highlighted here, in connection with the Cognizant matter, former executives Gordon Coburn and Steven Schwartz were criminally charged with FCPA violations.As highlighted here, in connection with is long-standing PDVSA bribery scheme enforcement action, the DOJ announced criminal FCPA and related charges against Rafael Pinto and Franz Muller.As highlighted here, in connection with the MTS matter, the DOJ criminally charged former MTS executive Bekhzod Akhmedov with FCPA and related offenses.SEC Enforcement (Corporate)The SEC brought three corporate FCPA enforcement actions in the first quarter. SEC recovery in these actions was approximately $272 million.Cognizant Technology Solutions  (Feb. 15)See here, here and here for prior postsCharges:  None (administrative order findings violations of the FCPA’s anti-bribery, books and records and internal controls provisions)Settlement: $25 millionOrigin: Voluntary disclosureIndividuals Charged: YesRelated DOJ Enforcement Action: YesMTS  (March 6)See here and here for prior postsCharges:  None (administrative finds violations of the FCPA’s anti-bribery, books and records and internal controls provisions)Settlement: $100 millionOrigin: The related Uzbekistan matters (MTS, Telia, and Vimpelcom) began with foreign media reportingIndividuals Charged: NoRelated DOJ Enforcement Action: YesFresenius  (March 29)See here for a prior postCharges:  None (administrative order finds violations of the FCPA’s anti-bribery, books and records and internal controls provisions)Settlement: $147 millionOrigin: Voluntary disclosureIndividuals Charged: NoRelated DOJ Enforcement Action: YesSEC Enforcement (Individual)As highlighted here, in connection with the Cognizant matter, the SEC charged Coburn and Schwartz with violating the FCPA’s anti-bribery, books and records and internal controls provisions.Other Developments or Items of InterestAs highlighted here, the DOJ made revisions to its FCPA Corporate Enforcement Policy.As highlighted here, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission issued an enforcement advisory concerning companies and individuals “that timely and voluntarily disclose to the Division violations of the Commodity Exchange Act involving foreign corrupt practices, where the voluntary disclosure is followed by full cooperation and appropriate remediation.”The Ninth Circuit concluded in a whistleblower action that the FCPA is not a “rule or regulation” of the SEC (see here ).As highlighted here , Canada is experiencing an OECD Article 5 moment as allegations of political interference are lodged against the Prime Minister’s office for attempting to persuade prosecutors to go light on SNC-Lavalin.last_img read more

Okanogan woman who murdered husband now deadSchool Delays and Closures for Friday

first_imgSharon Allard, the Okanogan woman who was arrested for the murder of her husband, died at Mid-Valley Hospital according to KREM TV. Allard was facing charges after being accused of shooting her husband Daniel after the two argued on December 20th.Sharon Allard had terminal cancer and Okanogan County Coroner Dave Rodriguez told KREM that she had been deteriorating for a while and had been on the county’s imminent death list even before the shooting.  Rodriguez described Allard’s death as “a sad ending to a really sad story”  Allard died early Thursday morning at Mid-Valley Hosipital in Omaklast_img

New model aims at speeding up lifesaving blood delivery to disasterhit areas

first_imgJun 29 2018A Portsmouth researcher is developing a mathematical model aimed at speeding up the delivery of life-saving blood to victims of earthquakes and other disasters.Dr Xiang Song hopes her work will reduce blood wastage and loss of life by increasing the chance of supplies reaching communities by the best routes with the most effective form of transportation in the quickest time possible.The University of Portsmouth lecturer has received a prestigious Royal Society International Exchanges Grant of £9600 for the research which will see her constructing an algorithm that can inform venue and location for temporary blood donation centers, blood transportation route and quantities delivered.Related StoriesDon’t Miss the Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery (B3DD) Summit this AugustHealthy blood vessels could help stave off cognitive declineMathematical model helps quantify metastatic cell behaviorHer work will be based on data collected from the Wenchuan earthquake of 2008 which affected the mountainous region of Sichuan province in Southwest China and resulted in the loss of more than 69,000 lives.Dr Song said: “Natural disasters cause enormous human and economic losses and disruption and their impact is increasing. In many earthquake disasters, the most critical factor for the wounded can be that blood becomes a scarce resource due to damaged transport infrastructure, the failure of blood banks in the affected areas and the challenge of accurately forecasting the large fluctuation in blood demand.”The unpredictable nature of disasters leads to sudden and sporadic demands for blood, a precious resource that needs to be stored carefully, transported efficiently and utilized rapidly before it perishes.Dr Song added: “Decision-makers can only make decisions on the amount and the location of blood to collect and the routes to delivery based on their experience, which may not always be effective in new situations. For example, in the disaster relief for the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, there was significant blood wastage caused by excessive and unbalanced types of collection and ineffective transport planning.”As a result, we realized that it is vital to design a resilient supply chain system to meet the demand for blood in time while simultaneously minimizing the blood wastage in disaster relief.”The aim of Dr Song’s study, The Resilient Blood Chain Supply System Design for Disaster Relief, is to improve a decision support tool used to manage massive disaster relief efforts. These systems allow rescuers to co-ordinate supplies by delivering from the most conveniently placed hospital, along the quickest routes to the areas most desperately in need.The aim of the research is to explore how the decision achieved through the software can be continuously updated according to the real-time updated blood demand in the specific region and under the changing circumstances. Source:http://uopnews.port.ac.uk/2018/06/26/improving-life-saving-blood-delivery-to-disaster-hit-areas/last_img read more

Encouraging people to eat a wide variety of foods may not be

first_imgAug 9 2018Encouraging people to eat a wide variety of foods to ensure they meet all their dietary needs may backfire, according to a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association that provides an overview of recent scientific studies.”Eating a more diverse diet might be associated with eating a greater variety of both healthy and unhealthy foods” said Marcia C. de Oliveira Otto, Ph.D., lead author of the statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation. “Combined, such an eating pattern may lead to increased food consumption and obesity.”Eating a variety of foods” has been a public health recommendation in the United States and worldwide for decades. While some dietary guidelines highlight greater diversity of recommended foods, there is little consensus about what so-called dietary diversity is, how it is measured and whether it is a healthy dietary goal. The statement authors conducted a thorough scientific literature review of articles published between January 2000 and December 2017. They concluded:Related StoriesDiet and nutrition influence microbiome in colonic mucosaMediterranean diet may improve memory in type 2 diabeticsPlant-based diet may be effective treatment for Crohn’s disease There is no evidence that greater overall dietary diversity promotes healthy weight or optimal eating. There is some evidence that a wider variety of food options in a meal may delay people’s feeling of satiation (fullness), increasing the amount of food they eat. Limited evidence suggests that greater dietary diversity is associated with eating more calories, poor eating patterns and weight gain in adults. Instead of telling people to eat a variety of foods, the statement authors conclude that dietary recommendations should emphasize adequate consumption of plant foods, such as fruit, vegetables, beans and whole grains, low-fat dairy products, non-tropical vegetable oils, nuts, poultry and fish, and limit consumption of red meat, sweets and sugary drinks. The American Heart Association Dietary Recommendations and the DASH Diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) are both examples of healthy eating patterns.”Selecting a range of healthy foods, which fits one’s budget or taste, and sticking with them, is potentially better at helping people maintain a healthy weight than choosing a greater range of foods that may include less healthy items such as donuts, chips, fries and cheeseburgers, even in moderation,” said Otto, who is also assistant professor of epidemiology, human genetics and environmental science at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Texas.Source: https://newsroom.heart.org/news/a-diverse-diet-may-not-be-the-healthiest-one?preview=dacdlast_img read more

Research finds drop in number of measles cases in the EUEEA since

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Sep 21 2018During the month of July, a total of 758 cases of measles were reported across seventeen countries in the EU/EEA, which is a decrease from the 1054 cases reported during the month of June.”Since March, the number of measles cases in the EU/EEA has dropped steadily, which is of course a positive development” says Tarik Derrough, ECDC senior expert on vaccine-preventable diseases. “However, measles continues to spread across Europe because vaccination coverage in most European countries remains sub-optimal. Only four EU/EEA countries reported figures of at least 95% vaccination coverage, for both doses of measles-containing vaccine for 2017. If the goal of eliminating measles is to be reached, vaccination coverage for children and adults needs to increase in a number of countries.”Looking at the situation over the past year (1 August 2017 to 31 July 2018), 14 118 cases of measles were reported across 30 EU/EEA Member States. The most cases were reported by Greece (3 224), Italy (2 873), France (2 794) and United Kingdom (1 724), accounting respectively for 23%, 20%, 20% and 12% of all cases reported by EU/EEA countries.Of 14 117 cases with known age, 4 250 (30%) were children less than five years of age, while 6 115 (50%) were aged 15 years or older. Source:https://ecdc.europa.eu/en/news-events/drop-eueea-measles-cases-between-march-and-july-2018last_img read more

How the enamel that coats your teeth evolved

first_imgThe hardest bit of your body is the enamel coating your teeth. But new analyses of fish fossils, as well as genetic analyses of a living fish species, suggest that this specialized material once served a very different function: to toughen some bones and scales of ancient fish. The findings bolster earlier suggestions that ancient fish had enamel-armored scales, and they point to a new scenario for exactly how the substance ended up on teeth.Enamel—an almost pure layer of a 
mineral called hydroxyapatite—coats the teeth of almost all tetrapods (four-limbed creatures) and lobe-finned fish such as 
coelacanths. Most living fish do not produce it, but Per Ahlberg, a paleontologist at Uppsala University in Sweden, found an ancient exception. Well-preserved fossils of an ancient fish called Psaroepis romeri reveal that this 20-centimeter-long minipredator, which prowled the seas between 410 million and 415 million years ago, had enamel in its scales and its skull—but not its teeth, according to a paper by Ahlberg and colleagues in the 24 September issue of Nature.Other teams had found partial fossils of fish with enamel on their scales. But those fragments might not have 
belonged to the same individual, Ahlberg says, so researchers couldn’t be  sure just how the enameled bits were distributed across the body, or if they came from 
individuals at different ages or developmental stages. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Ahlberg’s team instead looked at a single specimen of Psarolepis, slicing through the jawbone, skull bones, and scales to get a microscopic peek at their internal structure and so identify what they were made of. The teeth were naked dentine, the same material that underlies the enamel in your teeth and those of most modern tetrapods. But the scales and skull bones of this ancient fish included some enamel.Researchers had suggested that over millions of years of evolution, hardened structures such as external scales gradually migrated into the mouth and changed shape to become teeth. But the patchy distribution of enamel in Psarolepis may suggest a different scenario, in which the pattern of enamel production, rather than the of shape and location of already enameled structures, shifted over time.The team also analyzed the genome of the spotted gar 
(Lepisosteus oculatus), a modern-day species that produces a hard enamel-like material called ganoine that covers its scales. The genome shows that gar can produce two of the three proteins needed to make enamel, and suggests that ganoine is essentially a scale-coating version of enamel. Thus, it offers genetic support for the fossil evidence.These findings “are very interesting,” says Zerina Johanson, a paleobiologist at the Natural History Museum in London. In contrast to previous ideas, the work suggests that hardened structures such as scales may not have physically moved from one place in the body to another as species evolved. Instead, evolution may have shifted the activity of enamelmaking proteins to new body parts.“This may provide a better understanding of what was going on inside primitive vertebrates,” she says. Emaillast_img read more

Test your smarts on comb jellies prehistoric warfare and the smallest genome

first_img One 10 times as fast. Scientists often look to the so-called Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum as an analog for today’s rising temperatures, even though it happened more slowly than current global warming. A lingering question is what caused the massive prehistoric injection of carbon in the first place. It may have begun with bouts of volcanism in the oceans, which would have heated up organic carbon in surrounding rocks that then wound up in the atmosphere. Rising atmospheric temperatures would trigger other processes, such as the release of methane buried in the sea floor or carbon trapped in permafrost. Prairie dogs. Over 6 years of studying white-tailed prairie dogs in Colorado, researchers saw them chase and kill ground squirrels more than 100 times. But prairie dogs are herbivores, and they don’t eat their kills. So what turns them into ruthless murderers? Prairie dogs and ground squirrels eat the same grasses, live in the same prairies, and sometimes even use the same burrows. These close quarters and shared tastes pit the two species directly against each other in competition for food. Killing off ground squirrels boosts prairie dogs’ chances: The more squirrel murders these mostly female prairie dogs committed, the more offspring they were able to raise, the researchers found. Prairie dogs 4500 Humans aren’t nature’s only cold-blooded killers. Which animal routinely kills more baby ground squirrels than all other predators combined? Cockroaches Manta rays. When researchers put a mirror in the tanks of two giant manta rays, the fish didn’t act like they were meeting a fresh face. Instead, they circled around and flapped their wings, as if testing to see whether the reflection moved. This is similar to how apes act in front of a mirror, implying that manta rays are more self-aware than scientists previously thought. But other researchers—including the one who created the “mirror test” in the first place—are skeptical. They say the manta rays may have just been curious. Time’s Up! LOADING Venezuela Eating an injured member of its own species 0 / 10 Wine grapes 901 Twice as fast Only a small number of species, including humans and dolphins, recognize themselves in a mirror, suggesting self-awareness. Which species may have recently passed the mirror test and joined that exclusive club? March 28, 2016 The Science Quiz The faster you answer, the higher your score! Thailand Egypt 473 10 times as fast Pooping out of its butt Pooping out of its butt. The first animals that arose lacked an anus and had to eat and excrete through the same hole. Their modern-day descendants, such as sea sponges, sea anemones, and jellyfish, continue to use that strategy. Scientists thought comb jellies did too, until one researcher caught them on tape defecating through anus-like pores. The as-yet unpublished findings disrupt the stepwise progression of digestive anatomy from one to two holes early in animal evolution. French Polynesia March 28, 2016 Scientists have spotted an intriguing bright spot on the dwarf planet Ceres in the asteroid belt. What do they think it might be? Regenerating after being cut in half Fifty-six million years ago, a massive amount of carbon surged into the atmosphere, triggering a rise in temperature of 5°C. A new study suggests that the carbon was vented over the course of 4000 years. How much faster are humans pumping carbon into the atmosphere today? Wine grapes. In general, an early grape harvest—and a good wine—depends on a wet spring, a hot summer, and a late season drought. The researchers found that grape harvests have come on an average of 10 days earlier since 1981, thanks to higher summer temperatures. In other words, global warming has been good to wine. But that might be changing. Before 1981, hot summer temperatures typically came in drought years, and drought was an essential predictor for an early harvest and a good wine year. Now, the hot summers arrive with or without drought—a sign that the climatic relationship is not holding. Swimming in a directed manner, rather than passively floating Eagles Farmers are worried that hotter, drier weather associated with climate change could make it hard to grow many important crops. But so far, at least one is thriving in today’s higher temperatures. Which is it? 0 Known as Syn 3.0, the new organism has a genome whittled down to the bare essentials needed to survive and reproduce. It has 52 fewer genes than the bacterium Mycoplasma genitalium, which with 525 genes has the fewest of any free-living natural organism. Syn 3.0’s streamlined genetic structure excites evolutionary biologists and biotechnologists, who anticipate adding genes back to it one by one to study their effects. The function of 149 of Syn 3.0’s genes—roughly one-third—remains unknown. Investigators’ first task is to probe the roles of those genes, which promise new insights into the basic biology of life. Question Five Score A methane lake Weasels 525 No one knows Germany. The 3200-year-old battlefield was discovered along the Tollense River about 120 kilometers north of Berlin. Archaeologists have unearthed wooden clubs, bronze spearheads, and flint and bronze arrowheads. They have also found the remains of at least five horses and more than 100 men. Bones from hundreds more may remain unexcavated, and thousands of others may have fought but survived. The site may be the earliest direct evidence—with weapons and warriors together—of a battle this size anywhere in the ancient world. Average A volcano The Zika virus has raced through Latin America, and the link to the birth defect microcephaly is growing stronger. Researchers now estimate that the Zika virus arrived in Brazil between May and December 2013. Where did it come from? William E. Browne Koalas Britain Two Results: You answered out of correctly – Click to revisit Bananas Archaeologists have discovered evidence of a major battle that took place around 1250 B.C.E., an early instance of systemic warfare. Where did it take place? Top Ranker Nine No one knows. To try to retrace the virus’s route, the scientists compared the genomes of the Brazilian samples to those from patients in nine other countries, six from the current outbreak in the Americas and one each from French Polynesia, the Cook Islands, and Thailand. The sequences from the Americas were the most closely related; the sequence from Thailand was the most distant. That suggests the virus entered Brazil only once and spread to the rest of the Americas from there, but it’s not enough to pin down the source. Although researchers tend to focus on a 2013 outbreak in French Polynesia as a likely origin, other Zika-endemic countries have much larger populations and send more travelers to Brazil, including the Philippines, Indonesia, and Thailand. Dogs A mixture of ice and mineral salts. NASA’s Dawn spacecraft, which is in orbit around Ceres, has taken the highest resolution picture of the bright spot in the middle of the 90-kilometer-wide Occator crater. Scientists can now see that at the center of Occator is a 9-kilometer-wide pit, and in the center of that is an uplifted dome, 2 kilometers wide and full of ringlike fractures. Heat from the impact that made Occator about 80 million years ago probably allowed a mixture of ice, salts, and rock in Ceres’s interior to become more fluid and rise up to the surface, scientists say. They hope the fractured dome could give them a window to the ice thought to dwell below Ceres’s surface. You A mixture of ice and mineral salts Coyotes This week, scientists synthesized a bacterium with the smallest genome of any freely living organism. How many genes does it have? Start Quiz Trick question—today’s rate is slower 100 times as fast Manta rays Greece The Science Quiz Germany Rice Corn An error occurred loading the Quiz. Please try again later. An alien spaceship Back in the natural world, comb jellies evolved hundreds of millions of years ago. Scientists believed the gelatinous sea creatures hadn’t changed much since then. But recently, a comb jelly was caught on tape doing something shockingly complex. What was it? Tuberculosis (TB) killed 1.5 million people in 2014, making it the deadliest infectious disease in the world. But just because you get infected with the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis doesn’t mean you’ll get sick. Out of every 10 people infected, how many develop TB? One. More than 2 billion people—almost a third of the world’s population—carry M. tuberculosis, and predicting who will fall ill has so far been impossible. Now, scientists may have found one answer: a set of 16 genes that is more active in people who will develop TB than in those who are infected but stay healthy. Overall, the gene signature test picked out about 80% of infected people who would go on to develop TB in the next 12 months, but it also wrongly fingered about one-third of the people who would remain healthy. Still, scientists say, that level of accuracy may be enough to start at-risk people on drugs given to prevent TB. Share your scorelast_img read more

Scientists discover an underwater city full of gloomy octopuses

first_img By Erik StokstadSep. 13, 2017 , 5:02 PM Scientists discover an underwater city full of gloomy octopuses Octopuses are reclusive animals, and the gloomy octopus (Octopus tetricus) is no exception. During the day, it retreats into its den in the rocky reefs of Australia, which it often blocks with rocks. It comes out most often at night, to catch lobsters, crabs, and other creatures with its meter-long arms. But in 2012, researchers reported that the species is surprisingly social. Diving in Jervis Bay, Australia, the scientists documented as many as 16 gloomy octopuses all living in a large pile of discarded shells—dubbed Octopolis—mating and fighting, even during the daytime. Now, they have studied a second congregation a few hundred meters away—the slightly less mellifluous Octlantis. The structure, which hosts 23 dens, consists of three patches of rocks, each surrounded by mounds of shells. Video surveillance over 8 days revealed up to 15 octopuses that mated and fought there, the researchers report this month in Marine and Freshwater Behaviour and Physiology. The octopuses kicked each other out of dens, went on chases, and appeared to threaten each other by standing up and darkening their bodies. At one point, they didn’t even seem to notice a bottom-dwelling wobbegong shark sneaking up. The researchers suspect that limited den space might have led to the crowded conditions—and the dust-ups.last_img read more

With generous funding and toptier jobs China seeks to lure science talent

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country With generous funding and top-tier jobs, China seeks to lure science talent from abroad Simon says foreign scientists are drawn by China’s increased spending on R&D, which is rising twice as fast as its economic growth. Increasingly ambitious big science projects, such as a massive particle accelerator now under study, are a lure as well, says Cao Cong, a science policy specialist at the University of Nottingham Ningbo in China, an affiliate of the U.K. university. The opportunity for foreign scientists to serve as principal investigators for publicly funded programs is a significant new incentive, says Liang Zheng, who studies science and technology policy at Tsinghua University in Beijing.“There is really only one reason why I moved: the money,” says 35-year-old U.S. ecologist Luke Gibson, who transferred from The University of Hong Kong (HKU) to Southern University of Science and Technology (SUSTech) in Shenzhen, a booming city just across the border from Hong Kong, last September. His startup package at SUSTech totals 10 million yuan ($1.6 million), more than 40 times his research support at HKU. “It’s rare to find such an enormous level of support,” he says. Roughly half comes from the national government’s Thousand Talents Plan, aimed at bringing in overseas talent, with matching funding from the Shenzhen government and SUSTech. The support means he can hire four postdocs and extend his ecological studies to the Tibetan Himalayas, the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, the karst mountain region of south-central China, and the Pearl River delta. And whereas Gibson was on a 3-year fixed-term appointment at HKU, at SUSTech he is a tenure-track associate professor.Foreign academics can also join the faculty of one of nine overseas universities that now have Chinese mainland campuses, typically set up with local institutions. Most teach in English, making it easy for non-Chinese academics to feel at home. Duke Kunshan, for example, “recruited faculty from all over the world,” says Simon, who is the university’s executive vice chancellor. Roughly two-thirds of the more than 40 inaugural faculty members are non-Chinese and, like their counterparts at local universities, they can apply for national and local government research grants.Relocating to China comes with challenges. Gibson teaches in English but needs Chinese language help handling administrative matters and grant applications. Restricted access to internet sites such as Google is also a hurdle. “My research and my teaching regularly rely on access to online resources and search platforms [that are] blocked in China, so this is an impediment to my work,” Gibson says. But he has found workarounds. China shut down many virtual private networks, which provide access to blocked overseas sites, but a few remain. “There’s a saying: ‘Everything in China is difficult, but nothing is impossible,’ which I think reflects the situation very accurately,” Gibson says.China’s push to bring in foreign talent comes at a time when U.S. President Donald Trump is reportedly considering limiting student and academic visas in certain high-tech areas. That would be a mistake, Simon says. The one-way transfer of knowledge and expertise from the United States to China is a thing of the past, he says: “China increasingly has something to offer us in our own research endeavors.” New big science projects like the world’s largest radio telescope, make China an attractive destination. By Dennis NormileJun. 5, 2018 , 3:35 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img SHANGHAI, CHINA—When astronomer Marko Krčo was offered a chance to help commission the world’s largest radio telescope, he didn’t hesitate. “It’s a once in a lifetime opportunity,” says Krčo, who has Serbian and U.S. citizenship and earned his Ph.D. from Cornell University. In 2016, Krčo became a postdoc at the Chinese Academy of Sciences’s National Astronomical Observatories in Beijing; he spends much of this time in a remote corner of Guizhou province in southwest China, where the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) was completed in 2016. “Whether professionally or privately, every day yields a new challenge or a new insight,” Krčo says.The Chinese government, eager to sustain the country’s rapid emergence as a scientific superpower, is opening the door wider for people like him. On 22 May, the Ministry of Science and Technology issued guidelines that encourage science ministries and commissions to consult foreign experts and attract non-Chinese to full-time positions within China. In a striking change, foreign scientists are now allowed to lead public research projects. In the past decade, China has aimed to build up its scientific capacity by luring back some of the tens of thousands of Chinese scientists working abroad. The latest measures emphasize that non-Chinese talent is also welcome. Drafted in December 2017 but not previously made public, they are “a confirmation of things that have been going on for a while,” says Denis Simon, an expert on China’s science policy at Duke Kunshan University in China, a branch campus of the Durham, North Carolina–based Duke University. Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Xinhua/Alamy Stock Photo last_img read more